5th Jan 2018

Aussies raiding superannuation early

Why Aussies raid their super early
Drew Patchell

Recently released government data has revealed a rapid increase in the number of Australians dipping into superannuation early to pay for medical bills, mainly for weight-loss surgery.

The data revealed that last year more than 15,000 people accessed over $200 million from superannuation to fund medical bills. Over the past six years, there has been a five-fold increase in applications for early super release on medical grounds, drawing criticism from the peak body for doctors.

“We don’t oppose regulations that allow the early release of superannuation on medical grounds under compassionate circumstances, but we don’t think superannuation is the appropriate safety net to subsidise inadequate health funding,” said Australian Medical Association President Michael Gannon.

In other figures, the Financial Planning Association of Australia estimates a person in their 40s accessing $10,000 today would forfeit $42,000 in retirement savings over 20 years. A  person in their 30s accessing $10,000 today would reduce their retirement savings by about $180,000, the association said.



The Federal Government has already ordered Treasury to reconsider early release of superannuation rules and report back by March 2018.

“The current rules governing early release of superannuation on financial hardship and compassionate grounds have not changed substantially in the last 20 years,” the Minister for Revenue and Financial Services, Kelly O’Dwyer, told The Australian.

“For this reason, the Government has announced it will review these rules to ensure they are fit for purpose and strike an appropriate balance between protecting people’s retirement savings and giving a lifeline to those facing genuine hardship, whilst ensuring the rules can be administered fairly and effectively,” she said.

What do you think? Should stricter early release of superannuation rules be introduced?

Related articles:
Australians raid early-release superannuation
Aussies accessing super early
Illegal super access





COMMENTS

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roy
9th Jan 2018
10:14am
Weight loss surgery, jeez, how about eating less and doing some exercise which doesn't include chewing muscles.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jan 2018
10:58am
I lost nearly 60kg a couple of years back by giving up a lot of carbohydrates - bread, rice, pasta, and potato.
jackie
9th Jan 2018
11:13am
roy...if weight loss surgery can save a life ....that is a good investment and saves the Government in other medical expenses caused by obesity.
Tib
9th Jan 2018
12:39pm
Is weight loss surgery a permanent answer for those that basically lack any willpower? Probably isn't.
Tib
9th Jan 2018
12:50pm
Knows-a-lot 60 kgs well done. I lost 20 kgs and I thought I was going well.
Hasbeen
9th Jan 2018
2:27pm
Don't be silly Jackie.

The younger we die, [after retirement] the more we save the tax payer. Extending our lives is economically counter productive.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jan 2018
5:39pm
Thank you, Tib.
Kaz
9th Jan 2018
6:09pm
And education on nutrition from school age
jackie
10th Jan 2018
4:52pm
Hasbeen...The cost of Type 2 Diabetes cause by obesity is far greater than weight loss surgery. That is a fact.

https://static.diabetesaustralia.com.au/s/fileassets/diabetes-australia/e7282521-472b-4313-b18e-be84c3d5d907.pdf
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:04pm
jackie, as a victim of Type 2 Diabetes myself (largely due to genetics), I have to agree. Unless it's well-managed, it leads to a raft of terrible complications. I know, because I suffer from them - starting with chronic renal failure requiring haemodialysis (which, sadly, is actually killing me slowly and at the same time costing the taxpayer a lot of money). Prevention is best, as there's no cure...
Cowboy Jim
9th Jan 2018
10:34am
Quite a few people take their super earlier than planned for fears that they may have to take it out as an annuity later on, thus cancelling their Age Pension altogether when annuity money becomes income. Govt. policy changes are a good reason for grabbing the goodies early.
Kaz
9th Jan 2018
6:11pm
Agreed. Just look at what they’re trying to do to industry funds. Give them credit for good management and leave them alone.
OnlyGenuineRainey
9th Jan 2018
7:10pm
I told them people would start drawing big lumps of super and saving less in response to the stupidly changed assets test. The idiots in power can't do math! People are taking money out because having it in means forfeiting pension entitlement and in many cases having far less income than pensioners. Sure, they can draw their savings, but that's NOT what they saved for. Might as well pull it out and enjoy some benefit, rather than watching it trickle away to pay more to people who have more but manipulated more successfully.
john
10th Jan 2018
2:01am
Maybe ????
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:06pm
"Math", Rainey? Are you a Yank? It's mathS, or 'mathematics'. But actually you should be calling it arithmetic.
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:53pm
Well, pardon me, Knows-a-lot. I did do my limited years of high school education in the US as it happens.
Knows-a-lot
12th Jan 2018
7:13am
No, I won't pardon you. This is Australia. Speak and write Australian English. Better yet, inflict yourself again on the Yanks.
OnlyGenuineRainey
14th Jan 2018
1:17pm
Seems you get some sort of kick out of being nasty and insulting, Knows-a-lot. I said I had limited high school education. I do the best I can and I work hard constantly to improve. I've taught myself a great deal. Most who were privileged to have educational opportunity treat me with respect and courtesy. But then, most educated people seem to have more productive things to do with their time than abuse others.
Julian
9th Jan 2018
10:35am
As usual, addressing the symptoms and not the cause. Could it be that this problem is due to financial mismanagement on the parts of both the government and the people?
roy
9th Jan 2018
10:37am
Not at all, just look at all the "waddlers" going from junk food outlet to junk food outlet.
VeryCaringBigBear
9th Jan 2018
10:38am
Super is no good to one if one doesn't live to retirement age so why not allow them to use their super for a better life.
tropic
9th Jan 2018
12:38pm
You could say the same for insurance. A car insurance is no good if you never get an accident. Super is meant for a better life in retirement. It should be in addition to the age pension and not replace the age pension. Only politicians have that comfort at the moment. They get the pension with no income or asset test.
VeryCaringBigBear
9th Jan 2018
2:19pm
Tell that to the young bloke who died of a heart attack at 31 as he was very obese. Someone else got to enjoy his super whereas it may have saved his life if he had accessed it for medical treatment.
roy
9th Jan 2018
3:08pm
BigBear. Or if he had not been so greedy and just eaten less!
Knows-a-lot
9th Jan 2018
10:56am
In general, the cost of living has outstripped wage-growth, people have debt, and they need to access their superannuation NOW.
OnlyGenuineRainey
9th Jan 2018
7:16pm
Oh dear! A PHD and can't manage money? I drew a minimum wage for 3/4 of my working life and paid off over $100,000 in medical bills for a special needs child, plus supported a sick spouse and put my kids through university and I managed to get to retirement age a debt fee owner of a nice home with too much assets to qualify for a pension. But maybe I was just born smart.
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:09pm
Oh dear! Idiot-girl is parading her pig-ignorance magnificently! I manage my money beautifully. Despite being on a DSP and paying rent, by bank account keeps going UP.

I suppose you want a medal for your 'achievement'... (I actually earned three medals - a university medal, the Whyatt Medal, and a third one in Japan - something you will NEVER do, Ms Failure.)
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:12pm
"But maybe I was just born smart."

Definitely not! Hilarious delusions of adequacy. Take yer meds and see yer shrink.
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:50pm
I'm a lot smarter than you, Knows-a-lot, and it didn't cost tens of thousands to make me that way. I am also much more well-mannered.
Knows-a-lot
12th Jan 2018
7:15am
Dream on, idiot. Wrong again. Rain on someone else's parade. And get help for your bizarre delusions.
Knows-a-lot
12th Jan 2018
3:44pm
Rainey is the absolute antithesis of the wonderful English poetess Kathleen Raine, who had grace, wit, inspiration, and high intelligence.
Rosret
9th Jan 2018
10:57am
Actually, if weight loss surgery keeps the individual employable and stops further associated illnesses from obesity then it should be funded like any other procedure.
If people don't have to dip into their super for these procedures then that further takes the burden off the OAP cost to the government in future years.
Keeping the nation employable is a win-win for everyone.
Addressing the fact that there is a need for these procedures should be alarming enough to start targeting the source.
Get the trans-fats out of take away food. Lower the sugar and salt content in pre-processed food. Target schools and teach nutrition. Stop selling junk food at sporting venues, stop feeding school children cakes and lollies as rewards and birthday treats at school. The list goes on and on.
Don't allow children in the libraries at break times. Take away the seats around the school. They can eat lunch in the classroom.
Have no parking zones within 500 m of schools - buses included.
Target restaurants - require them to ONE healthy meal for children and adults.
It has got to the point where there doesn't seem to be anything but fried something on the menu.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jan 2018
11:05am
Self-discipline when it comes to eating costs nothing. People need to educate themselves regarding diet and eat responsibly. Start by avoiding regular visits to fast-food outlets.

"Don't allow children in the libraries at break times."

I disagree completely. Kids nowadays are ignorant enough as is. They should be encouraged to visit libraries as much as possible and to read those quaint information-rich things called "books".
heyyybob
9th Jan 2018
11:15am
A lot of good points there Rosret :) My wife and I are in the process of downsizing and in our travels to and from our new residence we have taken the lazy option of stopping off at a fast food outlet for a cuppa and a bite (sugar hit) to keep us going ;) We have, both, never been regular fast food takeaway eaters and have been surprised to see so many parents driving into/through the outlet with kids in their car for a breakfast selection OR dropping into same outlet with kids at after school times enroute, presumably, home :( The waves of obesity lapping this country and the ramifications is very soon to become a tsunami I fear.
Rosret
9th Jan 2018
11:24am
Except KnowsAT there are computers in the Library. They sit and sit and sit some more. They need a period of time when they are not reading or in front of a computer screen. School students spend lots of time during class time in the library.
Triss
9th Jan 2018
12:48pm
It's unfortunate that fattening fast food has been with us for so long it has now become normal food in many people's minds.
People are working longer hours and either don't have time to cook or have been raised on fast food themselves, it's fast, cheap and tastes good - yes, it must do or people wouldn't eat it. Also all that sugar and fat is addictive.
john
10th Jan 2018
2:05am
People have to do lots of things. And nobody on here, is people , they are simply themselves, generalisations are very very unhelpful. Big Bear I see your point mate.
Hardworker
9th Jan 2018
11:02am
Forget the obese who don't seem to know the difference between food and junk and need a lesson in self-discipline. You can live cheaply on good food even if you are too lazy to cook. You just need to know the difference between food and junk and not acquire a taste for junk. But let's face it, we're not just talking about drawing Super out for weightloss surgery. There are plenty of other medical situations that require lots and lots of money even if you have top private hospital insurance. That is the truly ridiculous situation where we have Medicare, the PBS and top private hospital cover but still have to fork out loads of money if we get seriously ill just to have the comfort of a private room which is just the equivalent of your private bedroom at home.
Badjack
9th Jan 2018
11:09am
It’s my money I should be free to choose what I do with it.
If some Leftard social justice warrior masquerading as a Doctor and AMA honcho says we shouldn’t then he should be reminded of his day job and to stop acting as a Financial Advisor
Hardworker
9th Jan 2018
11:10am
I have to agree with you Rosret. You only have to look at the Kids Menu to see where one of the problems lies. This is one reason to like Jamie Oliver. At least he pushes the importance of good food but just look at the resistance he came up against when he tried to introduce good food into schools in America. Soft drinks, fruit juices and snacks are big business. Everyone will have more money for the real necessities in life if they just look at how much they spend on unnecessary "food". We need to get back to being satisfied with the taste of water out of the tap instead of all these extra coffees, soft drinks and fruit juices.
Rosret
9th Jan 2018
11:30am
Absolutely. In fact Jamie's Oliver's fruit punch - water melon and lemon slices with a dash of basil leaves and the grand kids love it. I do too. Zip in the way of calories and its so good for you.
I just say,"Would you like a Jamie Oliver?" and they always reply, "Yes, please."
However, it is expensive and I do understand why the low-socio economic population is eating, and then becoming addicted to, the junk food.
Ductape
9th Jan 2018
11:19am
What about the dilemma for those of us who have managed to obtain some super, but still depend upon the aged pension 'entitlement', (and I don't say entitlement lightly) to ward off living on the poverty line......and who then fall ill, requiring life-saving medical intervention.
Under these circumstances, utilizing the public health system often means an early death sentence due to lack appropriate facilities and long waiting queues.

Thus, many people, in order to live longer, have to dip into what super they have to withdraw a lump sum in order to finance an operation or attempt to obtain life saving treatment - and there's no second guessing as to who is waiting just around the corner to jump into action to cut down your pension payment because you have done this!
Plus - courtesy of the tax department - there are now proportionate income taxes due, simply because you feel the need to live a little longer.
KSS
9th Jan 2018
12:39pm
Ductape if it were a life saving medical intervention that was required the person would get it under medicare. It is the elective surgery they would have to wait for. i.e. interventions for ailments that may be deemed necessary but not life saving e.g. knee replacement but it won't kill them if they have to wait.
Rosret
9th Jan 2018
12:55pm
KSS it is a much bigger issue than this. (excuse the pun). Many aren't actually eating that much. However what they are eating is low in nutrition and high in carbs/fat/sugar/salt.
The lower the socio-economic group the more they eat the cheaper foods. They taste good and are very addictive so they crave the next hit of junk food and even dislike the thought of fruit and veggies.
It really is time for governments to intervene rather than just tax everything.
Sundays
9th Jan 2018
10:21pm
Well KSS, a friends mother waited nearly 5 years for cataract surger. It didn’t kill her but her eyesight decreased where her quality of life was severely affected. Another friends mother was waiting in constant pain for hip replacement. Fortunately her family were in a position to help out. In these situations, I would access my super as waiting lists are too long
Ductape
10th Jan 2018
9:13am
I understand what you're trying to convey KSS, but this is not always the case. In a great many instance's, waiting for an appointment to have life saving medical treatment utilizing the public system via Medicare, can place a patient at far greater risk of dying, simply because of the long waiting queues.

It's not what the medical profession likes to broadcast, but from personal experience, I know this to be the case. I suddenly developed cancer and was extremely lucky I had a little super and was able to utilize most of it to circumvent the public system by going private within three weeks of the cancer being discovered.

Had I not had the opportunity to delve into my meagre super, I would have had to wait over three to four months to get it done via Medicare - and even then, there was no guarantee the op could have proceeded after this time period - unless of course the cancer was prone to becoming more aggressive, or had metastasized.

If this was to occur, then certainly, the system via Medicare would have come to my aid, but because of the wait, the odds against me surviving very long would have become far greater.

Not having to wait for the public system, gave me my best chance.

'Sundays' comments are so right - better to spend your Super and remain poorer for the experience, than become some rich dude buried in the cemetery.
Grateful
9th Jan 2018
11:21am
It's their money for goodness sake. If they want to feel MUCH better why not have the surgery. Those with the serious weight problems probably wouldn't reach superannuation age anyway.
If those hypocritical medical "peak bodies" want to be so considerate to people's welfare, they should get stuck into their own members who charge WAY above the prescribed fee and put huge pressure on people who NEED surgery because of their GREED.
Ductape
9th Jan 2018
12:19pm
No argument from this direction Grateful.

Must make quite a few of those in the medical profession feel good, to know that each time they take their bi-annual overseas cruise, they've been able to afford it courtesy of some other poor bastard's misery - and they've been able to apply exorbitant charges for the privilege.
KSS
9th Jan 2018
12:43pm
So can they withdraw the money on 'feel better' grounds before or after they have withdrawn more for education or housing? Two other 'must haves' from super funds recently promulgated. If this continues there will be no super left and what then? Oh yes that's right. They are 'entitled' to a Government pension!

Super is for funding retirement and that is all it should be spent on.
Triss
9th Jan 2018
12:57pm
I have to agree with you, Grateful, I swear that when we were all pushed into private health funds the medical people took fees from the funds and charged what they would have originally charged as a gap fee, so being paid twice for the procedure.
john
10th Jan 2018
2:19am
Correct grateful, the surgeons and specialists all these people whom if you are a patient, you have to mess your time around their time , and then pay massive amounts for their expertise, it is a general fact that people who specialise deserve good rewards for their expertise, but many in fact, I'd say most , charge way above the line they need to , and private health has nasty conditions all over their policies , but these people with the skills could actually charge much less and make life a little easier , maybe get more work and still be rich
I get a little annoyed with some of these so called saviors in surgery who are just greedy , like some of the charges for your vet to operate on a pet , but that is another racket, that the not so well off put up with.
Wealthy health professionals and greedy vets , its all true. I bet there are many people who spend about 2 or 3 minutes in a post op room with the mighty one (the Doc, or the Mr, you know) yes everything's fine , smile and leave , and the 3 minutes has cost you anything from 80 dollars to 200 dollars, you can do nothing , and its why the health insurance system is also in a mess, and have a million different reasons why they can't cover this or that, Then spend most of the time trying as hard as they can to give you less than you need. . But health insurance is a racket too.
Tib
9th Jan 2018
12:43pm
I can see people withdrawing some super so they retain their OAP. It seems that around $800000 you may be better of spending it and getting the pension than living from it and getting no OAP?
OnlyGenuineRainey
9th Jan 2018
8:29pm
Spot on, Tib. Many who are just over the new assets threshold have incomes of half the OAP and no benefits. They have a choice of living off their savings for the benefit of others (many of whom have more) or having a big spend up to qualify for benefits and in some cases double their income. I know which I'd choose if I were in that position. And I warned politicians they were opening a can of worms with a change based on seriously flawed logic. But I didn't really expect them to listen.
Old Man
9th Jan 2018
12:50pm
When all is said and done, our health is the most important thing we have. If people want to use their super to attend to health problems, I can't see why they should be not allowed to do so.
Tib
9th Jan 2018
12:58pm
Never mind weight loss surgery ladies if you want to stay young the best ways are. Exercise , keep weight off and protect yourselves from the sun. Exercise is both important for your physical health and mental health, weight loss is just a bonus.
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:13pm
I'd add: give up the booze and smoking.
MICK
9th Jan 2018
1:22pm
No surprise this government wants to stop people from accessing their super early. Whilst super is not there for day to day bills I need to ask what people are supposed to do if they have medical conditions and the system does not work for them?
roy
9th Jan 2018
3:13pm
Ha ha, MICK, I just knew it would be this governments' fault, you never fail to amuse me. It's not the fatso's fault for eating the wrong things and too much generally, blame Malcolm Turnbull.
Kaz
9th Jan 2018
6:07pm
That’s not what Mick said Roy. He was talking about if the rules are changed, what do those genuine cases do? This helps to feed into the conversation for govts’ consideration.
roy
9th Jan 2018
9:56pm
Kaz. MICK said this gov't. My point is that he never misses an opportunity to have a pop at the LNP and Malcolm Turnbull. It would be interesting to see what his comments would be if Shifty Shorten was our PM.
Obesity should be dealt with by discipline and not surgery.
Watto
9th Jan 2018
1:37pm
Take away the seats around the school. They can eat lunch in the classroom.

School cleaners Australia wide thank you. Twit
Blondie
9th Jan 2018
1:57pm
By the time you die, there should be very little money left in your super fund. You won't live forever, and it's a mistake to keep your fund intact....it's there to make your last few years comfortable....holidays, maybe a renovation, new appliances, car....whoever you plan to nominate it to will have to pay a huge tax on what's left.....it's yours, so USE IT!!!!!
Tib
10th Jan 2018
7:58am
Sounds good ,tell me the date of my death and I'll make sure I spend my last dollar the day before.
OnlyGenuineRainey
10th Jan 2018
8:08am
Good point, Tib. There are several others touting this silly idea that we should all die broke. Well, I would be happy to if only someone would give me a crystal ball and a guarantee that if it predicted incorrectly, I'd be fully supported in the style I wish to live from the predicted date until my actual date of death.
Knows-a-lot
13th Jan 2018
9:31am
Dying broke is in some senses ideal, because you cannot take your money or property into the afterlife. Shrouds do not have pockets. On the other hand, leaving something for those you care about is not a bad idea.
floss
9th Jan 2018
2:32pm
After the Hockey disaster when people lost their pension what choice did they have but to dip into their super, bills must still be paid. A lot of people have placed their super into a high risk investment to make up for the loss of pension but in a downturn this could be a disaster.The cost of living is out of control under this government and we have no choice but to dip into our super.
Old Man
9th Jan 2018
2:56pm
Nice rhetoric Floss, who lost their pension under Hockey and how many people have gone high risk.
roy
9th Jan 2018
3:14pm
Answers please floss.
OnlyGenuineRainey
10th Jan 2018
2:46pm
I believe some 92,000 lost their pension under Hockey. Not sure how many went to high risk investments, but my financial adviser claims over 80% spent up big on housing or cruises to get back under the threshold because their extra savings were costing them. My math validates that claim, unless they are getting net returns over 7.8%, and even then risk is a consideration.
OnlyGenuineRainey
10th Jan 2018
2:50pm
And I think over 350,000 had their pensions slashed. I know couples who lost $20,000+.
Raphael
9th Jan 2018
2:37pm
People access their super early so that they can spend it and be eligible for OAP
Purely greedy selfish reasons
Tib
9th Jan 2018
3:10pm
True but I think the government could do more to support self funded retirees, people might be more inclined to hold onto their money rather than get rid of it to get the OAP. You know I won't get the OAP but I think there is still a need for it but I can see it being phased out over time as people's Super makes it unnecessary.
OnlyGenuineRainey
9th Jan 2018
7:13pm
Government policy drives the selfishness, Raphael. They make policy that rewards manipulation and greed and punishes honesty and responsible living, and then wonder why we don't all save to be worse off than if we didn't. Do they really think everyone is so stupid that they can't do the math. Or is it that the pollies can't do the math and their advisers are all idiots?
Ductape
10th Jan 2018
8:05am
Never at truer word written Rainey.
Knows-a-lot
13th Jan 2018
9:33am
... can't do the MATHS, Rainey. This is Australia, not America.
sunnyOz
9th Jan 2018
3:18pm
Why am I dipping into my super? - to survive! 6 months from Aged Pension date, I got shafted from my job. Took some money out of super to have to pay mortgage, bills, etc. So Centrelink say I have too much money, and I am NOT entitled to a cent of Newstart. So I have NO income for 5 months, and only a very small amount in super that will soon be whittled away. I argued with Centrelink that any SUPER money is not to be taken into account - they argued that the minute it hit my bank account, it was not regarded as super, My BIG mistake? - going to Centrelink AFTER I withdrew the money from super. So no - I am not diving into my super to live a lavish lifestyle, or to reduce my super to get the OAP. And then I read about certain Sudanese so-called refugees complaining that Centrelink does not pay them enough when they have never contributed a cent to this country! So much for never ever claiming welfare, and working my butt off - I can't get a cent of help when I need it.
Cowboy Jim
10th Jan 2018
10:31am
If I had my time all over again I would not bother saving anything just to see all the deadbeats and wasters having a better life than responsible people. Yes, people, take your super and enjoy what you
still have available, the Govt might take it away at any time.
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:52pm
Hear, hear, Cowboy Jim. Only bit I disagree with is the last. God won't get the chance to take it away. The stinking government will make sure they get to it first.
floss
9th Jan 2018
4:12pm
SunnyOz some Australians do feel hard done by when they view what is happing with new arrivals.
Charlie
9th Jan 2018
4:12pm
Weight loss surgery ridiculous.
I drew my super 8 years before 65 because of illness and unable to continue full time employment
The big mistake I made is drawing the whole lot and putting it in the bank. I should have tried to arrange some kind of part payment because I ended up with an amount in the bank that excluded me from full disability pension payment. Over $70 000 at the time.
ex PS
9th Jan 2018
4:20pm
The big question is, if obesity is such a life threatening problem, why is surgery to correct the problem not funded better, why is this something that people who can't afford the treatment have to dig into their future security for?
roy
9th Jan 2018
4:31pm
The big question is, why should we have to pay for their sheer greediness and utter stupidity?
Raphael
9th Jan 2018
4:31pm
Oh Gawd - typical comment from ex Communist but still socialist PS

Obesity is NOT a disease - its just greedy people eating too much.

And these greedy pigs are digging into their super to have cosmetic surgery now so that they can go be eligible OAP later

Looking at your pic there exPS - you certainly could benefit from plastic surgery and perhaps laser treatment for your growth
ex PS
11th Jan 2018
10:01am
Well they do say that pet owners start to resemble their pets, I don't see it myself. I own a cat.
Kaz
9th Jan 2018
6:00pm
It’s your money... although I didn’t know you could access it unless you were totally incapacitated or reached the age
Charlie
9th Jan 2018
7:03pm
I find it very strange that the article makes no mention of this kind of weight loss, to improve personal appearance. I would have thought that to be a major reason. I suppose you have to say its for medical reasons to get the money released.
Raphael
9th Jan 2018
7:56pm
I will not be surprised if some deliberately eat themselves into an obese state so that they can then withdraw their super on medical grounds, and spend it before reaching pensionable age so that they will get OAP
The money is probably also not spent on lap band (cosmetic) surgery but spend on holidays and gifts to kids
Kathleen
9th Jan 2018
8:12pm
So judgmental, some people on here! You don’t know everyone’s stories and journey. Some people need their super to buy a home on retirement. As for weight, it is very complicated especially for some.
roy
9th Jan 2018
9:49pm
GrandmaKathleen22You're right we don't know everybody's story here, but what I do know is that almost every day I see people waddling into the cafe where I'm having a coffee, some of them can hardly fit into the chairs and then they order just about the worst most fattening thing on the menu. They are so stupid and weak that there is no hope for them. They could have weight reduction surgery and I guarantee that they will be back onto the junk food almost the day after the surgery.
We were not discussing drawing from super to buy a home but to use it for surgery,did you read the article above? It's not being judgemental, it's having a discussion.
john
10th Jan 2018
1:59am
Sometimes its to do with health and/ or self esteem. People who don't understand this are rather narrow in their outlook, and only see into themselves, as how to do it. Hope your on your bike Roy 10 ks minimum , doing your 200 push ups , chin ups, sit ups, and only having a lettuce leaf for breaky and a drink of water?
john
10th Jan 2018
2:02am
Roy you are becoming a nasty individual brother, your answer to Big Bear is an answer from tunnel vision old fella!
roy
10th Jan 2018
11:09am
john, I'm sorry if the truth hurts but the truth is the truth is the truth. I also shoot from the hip.
No I don't do much exercise these days but I do eat sensibly because I like to feel good and energetic and would hate to join the waddlers who have no self discipline.
roy
10th Jan 2018
11:51pm
I forgot to ask, are you one of those waddlers john?
Hmm, thought so!
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:55pm
Someone I love is one of those ''waddlers'', Roy - cursed with a genetic disorder that makes it very hard to manage weight and also causes mild retardation. I suppose you condone persecuting him also?
Knows-a-lot
12th Jan 2018
3:46pm
One of your offspring?
OnlyGenuineRainey
14th Jan 2018
1:18pm
What a vile question, Knows-a-lot.
OnlyGenuineRainey
10th Jan 2018
8:21am
On the subject of obesity - I know of a child who has a rare genetic condition that makes him incapable of feeling ''full'' and always wanting more food. People with this condition also tend to have low muscle tone and resist exercise. He is under the care of a dietician, on whose professional recommendations his mother is feeding him more than the average working man eats, despite him being just a toddler!

I was shocked to see that he was eating 5 large meals a day, but the mother showed me the meal plan the dietician gave her. Yes, he's getting very fat. No wonder! This mother at least ensures he does engage in a lot of physical activity. She takes him to the park every day and to a gym and to swimming lessons weekly, and she has him in a couple of physically strenuous activity programs that he attends once a week. But what the hell is the dietician doing suggesting a toddler needs 5 very large meals a day - and a total of more than the average working man eats?

Talking to other young mothers, it appears that they are being advised to feed little ones far more than we fed our children. And with ''treat'' food being much more affordable than it used to be, and seemingly kids' parties far more frequent, the kids are having soft drinks and cakes etc. far more frequently that was common for earlier generations. I recall being told lemonade was for when you were sick with a tummy upset (and it was served flat) and soft drinks were consumed at Christmas and on your own birthday. I think I consumed an average of three bottles of soft drink a year up until I was 16.
Knows-a-lot
11th Jan 2018
2:17pm
" I know of a child who has a rare genetic condition that makes him incapable of feeling ''full'' and always wanting more food."

That happened to my late father. not due to genetics but because of the location in his brain of an aneuryism (stroke).

The kid you talk about will die very young.
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:46pm
Yes, Knows-a=lot, doctors say he has a less than average life expectancy - but many with his condition live well into their 60s.
Knows-a-lot
12th Jan 2018
3:47pm
Well into their 60s IS less than the average life expectancy.
OnlyGenuineRainey
14th Jan 2018
1:13pm
Yes, it is, and it's very sad that this poor fellow will suffer a great deal and die relatively young.
jimbo
11th Jan 2018
3:14pm
i guess, if you don't raid it early the government will raid it for you
OnlyGenuineRainey
11th Jan 2018
7:47pm
Spot on, Jimbo. This government is determined to ensure all retirees, other than the very wealthy, live out their retirement poor.
Blossom
12th Jan 2018
8:02pm
I wonder how long people have to wait for funds to be released for weight reduction surgery. It takes a few weeks to access funds after proving financial hardship of your own business through no fault of your own and the risk of also losing your house which has a small mortgage on it, and a loan on the vehicle which is your only source of income for which a faulty replacement motor was supplied and only did 35km on the road after being fitted by a fully qualified mechanic. Inspection proved the mechanic who fitted it was not at fault in any way. The supplier took over 12 months to pay compensation despite court order.
VeryCaringBigBear
12th Jan 2018
10:02pm
If it takes too long people just move their super to another fund who they know will release their funds. An internet search will tell yo which funds will release your money quickly.


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