12th Jan 2018
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Renewed calls for watchdog to investigate public service corruption
corrupt officials shaking hands

A recent survey of public servants revealed that many of them have witnessed corruption first-hand, with reported instances of misconduct doubling in the past three years.

Even the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) has admitted that there is corruption within the bureaucracy, although it says cases of dishonesty are rare and that there is no need for a watchdog.

It's own survey revealed that around five per cent of respondents witnessed corruption first-hand and that 59 per cent believe they work in a high corruption-risk environment.

Apart from reports of general misconduct, nepotism and cronyism were also high on the list.

Co-author of The Australia Institute The Cost of Corruption report, Rod Campbell, believes such unscrupulous practices increased business costs and caused inequality, saying a federal independent commission against corruption is needed to stem the flow of duplicity in Australia.

"The perception of corruption is on the rise, the number of public servants who have witnessed corrupt behaviour is on the rise and public trust in federal parliament is at an all-time low,” he said.

"As well as the obvious democratic cost, corruption and the perception of corruption also costs our economy."

In fact, the report estimates that corrupt practices could cost the Government over $72 billion – or four per cent of the nation’s GDP.

There are also fears that any known corruption would only be the tip of the iceberg.

"We know that in the public service, whistleblowing is absolutely frowned on," said President of Transparent International Anthony Whealy QC.

"People who work in the public service, in many instances, would be afraid to report their superiors or even their equals who are involved in corruption."

According to The Australia Institute report, trust in government is at an all-time low in Australia.

While a parliamentary comittee has previously put the brakes on a federal anti-corruption body, Mr Whealy believes the Government will eventually come around.

"By the time we get to the next election, this is going to be a hot election issue, and I'm hoping there will be bipartisan support," he said.

Do you think there is a need for a federal anti-corruption body? Do you trust the Government?

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    COMMENTS

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    floss
    12th Jan 2018
    10:32am
    Yes in some countries it is normal practice and as we take in these people it becomes a way of life here. I know it is common practice in the N.S.W . Government Departments with their contractors.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:23pm
    I take it you are referring to certain ethnic groups with whom nepotism etc are part of the culture? Look at your baggage handlers in airports........ guess who..... and all buddies and family. One gets in, gets a supervisory spot, and feeds mates and cronies etc inside information so they can get a job as well.

    Same in the public service... remember what I said about those silly 'first hurdle' questions that any good organisation would explain to a new employee within five minutes on the job? I mean - why ask someone about standard operating procedure if they've never worked with you? And then you get the correct answer from someone's crony and he/she gets the job. How stupid is that?

    That is, BTW, in this day and age, a serious security risk.

    I met an Australian once when I stopped him getting on board an aircraft at Mascot with a food delivery team - his photo ID was expired and he was most put out when I said 'No Board-ee!' I let him in when he swore the new one had been left at home and the other guys vouched for him... and because he was clearly an Australian and unlikely to set a bomb or anything ..... but I had to make a report.

    Nowadays no way would he get in, and he probably wouldn't be Australian now anyway.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:24pm
    Oh - I also read his behaviour and body language - he was genuine.... just saying.
    Ahjay
    12th Jan 2018
    10:33am
    The best place to start may be to make it a criminal offence to both make or receive, political donations. I feel that they are only made with the expectation of something in return.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:11pm
    I totally agree! The only thing to donate to a politician is a bullet - at high velocity.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:33pm
    A li' ol' time on the chain gang building the Outback roads never hurt nobody..... no need to bullet them - just re-educate them.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    5:51pm
    They're impossible to re-educate. Turn them into fertilizer.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    8:47pm
    That's what Pol Pot did after failing to 're-educate' them by putting to work in the paddy fields to learn the true value of hard manual labour.
    Linda
    12th Jan 2018
    11:00am
    It seems there is a given level of corruption in Australia, it is not isolated to public service, it may be there but it is also rife in banks, and financial services, and in property development and real estate, just for starters. When laws are enacted to make a few rich at the expense of the many and there are political donations at the heart of it, then, bingo it is a corrupt government. Now, corruption at the top has impacted on our treasured ABC both television and radio. We have Murdoch's sticky fingers on our news, and now on our programming. He, as just one example gets fabulous tax breaks and a slice of any pie going in the media industry thanks to his power brokering methods. So, corruption where ever it is results in a decline of our society.
    inextratime
    12th Jan 2018
    11:11am
    I am sure there is corruption at all levels of business. An investigation into the Public Service is long overdue and should not be delayed on the basis that other institutions also need investigating.
    Hairy
    12th Jan 2018
    11:09am
    I am single old age pensioner,I have two current overlapping consession cards.2018 to2018 I received a new card also overlapping till 2019 two weeks ago.this week I have received the same card again exactly the same.im sure there are family’s who are receiving these cards are not throwing them . They can and will be used for fraudulent purposes .why is the question I have to ask?doesnt one department know what the other is doing.? This computer age should not be experiencing duplication like this.i wouldn’t mind a fee for a picture ID with a chip for details of Medicare and concessions combined .instead of this waste of resources that is happening by goverment departments.its a bloody disgrace .Then have the cheek to discriminate against pensioners and disabled.
    Rae
    12th Jan 2018
    11:21am
    It's the contractors hired to write the programs not up to scratch.

    Probably some overseas fly by night mob long gone now taking the fees with them.

    I couldn't believe that licences were being sent out by mail either but there you have it. Security obviously not a priority.

    The days when proper public servants worked their way from the bottom up through hard years of learning, peer and senior inspections and reviews and seniority are long gone.

    Now any bright young spark with a degree, a good CV and charisma can take over.
    Rae
    12th Jan 2018
    11:15am
    Appointment of very aggressive egocentric personnel on merit must result in increase corruption.

    Also Credlin decimated the higher experienced Public Servants and appointed young liberal types. Not only losing a great deal of knowledge and skills but those who could keep an eye on the balls.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    12:02pm
    Depends on how you define merit, Rae.
    Rae
    12th Jan 2018
    2:20pm
    I define it as knowing and using the current jargon with a dose of charisma and a huge ego.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:25pm
    Sounds about right........
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:13pm
    Young Liberal types are vermin that should be flushed down the toilet.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    7:22pm
    Meat manager at the local Coles said he had three relies applying for a job in the new Bunnings - two of them worked in tradie stuff - the other had not the slightest idea. The one with no idea studied up on the company, sat down and BS-ed his way through the interview, and got the job.

    That is a sure sign of PPM - piss poor management.
    Charlie
    12th Jan 2018
    11:50am
    Yes the Public Service has been corrupt for a long time and its not the little things like someone slipping out for a coffee, its about the influence of being a supporter of one of the political parties.

    First thing that comes to notice is the above average number of restructures to put cronies in the best positions.

    Then there is the fake performance agreements where people don't really have to achieve what they are "gunna do." Then the fake academic achievement where people merely enroll on a graduate course to apply for a higher position and then drop out.

    The old public service was a place where people could get a secure job and work at a casual pace if they were prepared to settle for lower wages than the private sector.

    The corruption came when the blame for the bad state of the Australian economy, was put on the cost of running the public service instead of on botched overseas investment.

    One of the first attempts to apply this was the Greiner liberal government in New South Wales about 1990 that attempted to apply corporate management to completely destroy the former public service and restructure it. People were given redundancy packages and some seemed to pop up in the same jobs that were simply given a different name. There was so much widespread discontent that there was related office conflict still going on 15 years later.

    Things would have been better if they had just left the public service alone, to adopt new technologies at a leisurely pace that was genuine, instead of partaking in fake performance indicators
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:14pm
    "One of the first attempts to apply this was the Greiner liberal government in New South Wales"

    Yep, the Lieberals are unspeakable scumbags.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    3:25pm
    I suppose Bill Shorten and his union scum are your pin up boys knows nothing.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    5:56pm
    Yes, you total ignoramus, I'd prefer them any day. All the thinking politicians came from the ALP, not from your retarded side of politics (where you belong, dimwit). It's YOU who "knows nothing".
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    8:49pm
    Greiner and Carr, in my eyes, were the two worst things to happen to NSW, though there are some close runners-up.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    12:00pm
    Been reading some of my recent posts? Hmmm.. well ... all I can say is if there is nothing to hide, why not have a watch dog? Trouble with the watch-dog is it will probably be staffed by the same cronies and nepoties as the current PS .. and anyone who has worked there knows about inequalities and unequal treatment.

    I resigned over that last issue from the CPS, and refused the avenue of going the 'stress' termination with 2/3 salary indexed for life..... my experience of the CPS was that it was like a schoolyard... and run that way.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    2:22pm
    So TREBOR you take welfare instead to bludge of us taxpayers, you have never been the sharpest tool in the shed it must have cost you a fortune.
    Some of us do pay for our stupid decisions?
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:26pm
    I am the taxpayer. Thanks for coming.... and I don't take welfare.... I accept what is my right. I've always been the sharpest tool in the shed..... ask my legion of loyal fans here and elsewhere.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    2:30pm
    You don"t pay tax when you receive welfare you get a share of what everyone else is paying .
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:17pm
    Never heard of the GST, Roby? EVERYBODY who purchases most things pays it, thereby making them a taxpayer. And calling a pension "welfare" is the assertion of a cretin.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    3:23pm
    Yes Knows a lot if you take welfare you are a cretin and also a bludger/loser?
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:28pm
    Ah, Roby.. I forgot you were here... you may go now...

    Your kind of personal insult is not worthy of discussion other than a short sentence to describe the door to you... now good day, sir...
    ex PS
    12th Jan 2018
    5:36pm
    Roby, insulting people does nothing to save a bad, ill thought out argument.
    Take a deep breath and try again, try and put your thoughts in writing in a way that makes sense and people may be willing to listen.
    TREBOR
    13th Jan 2018
    6:13am
    Early finish day on the part-time casual building labourer job, Roby?
    Triss
    12th Jan 2018
    12:26pm
    You can guarantee when the government has something it desperately needs to hide, corruption in this case, there will be widespread media coverage on how pensioners and the OAP is burdening the taxpayer and, as more people access the pension, will bankrupt the country.
    According to Government reports corrupt practices cost the Australian taxpayer $72 Billion, 4% of the nation’s GDP against the Aged Pension of around $48 billion which is 3.5% of GDP. So the story that pensioners are the biggest burden on the taxpayer doesn’t come anywhere near the truth. Also
    Federal Treasury projections to 2050 show welfare spending as a proportion of GDP will remain steady over the next three decades so no truth in the Age Pension bankrupting the country either.
    Perhaps we need to tell the Young Liberal upstart and the rest of government to put their own house in order before they start on ours.
    Knight Templar
    12th Jan 2018
    12:37pm
    A Federal anti-corruption body? Who would police it? The Human Rights Commission subverted the human rights of several people with impunity. Whistleblowers legislation has become a weapon to use against legitimate whistleblowers even when correct procedures are followed and unlawful behaviour is exposed. Nepotism and financial corruption begin at the political level and cascade down to senior and often middle management levels of the public service.
    HS
    12th Jan 2018
    12:40pm
    "As well as the obvious democratic cost, corruption and the perception of corruption also costs our economy."
    - So, why do Australians tolerate "Criminal Minds" in government? - Why do they keep voting for them?
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    1:29pm
    Re that photograph - is there some contention that corruption and nepotism and cronyism is the exclusive domain of men?

    Balanced reporting on facts, people....
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    1:33pm
    'are' the exclusive domain of men?

    Anyway - reality check (and cheque) - PREFERENCE was the policy for women and ATSIs and 'non-English speaking background' people.. and probably still is. If that's not corruption, nepotism and cronyism - what is?

    I was astounded to speak with a lass a few years back who told me how nasty the public service was (she'd resigned) and how favouritism was the order of the day - and this after thirty years of 'equal employment opportunity'?

    She should have tried being a man during those years.....
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    2:47pm
    TREBOR you are typical of most public servants can't even put a sentence together without having two shots at it.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:18pm
    "Re that photograph - is there some contention that corruption and nepotism and cronyism is the exclusive domain of men?"

    It's typical of the feminist crap rife here at YLC.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:22pm
    Roby, look who's talking! Your sentence should read "... public servants, who can't ...". But of course it makes sense, with you being a dull Right-winger...
    Sundays
    12th Jan 2018
    2:02pm
    These days it’s all about being innovative and cutting corners at the expense of following procedures and compliance. In the last few years, career public servants with lots of knowledge have been replaced with inexperienced staff who are only looking to their next promotion. The other thing is the increase of power to Ministerial staffers. These people are unelected representatives, accountable to no one
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:29pm
    Yet another government within a government, Sundays? Yes - staffers should be severely restricted to their proper function - being staffers. They have no rights to dictate over the politician's 'domain'.

    As for staff - well - PC has ruined it and Howard's Way of replacing the senior management with contracted employees means those are sycophants to the government of the day and have forfeited any independence of the public service.
    Knight Templar
    12th Jan 2018
    2:51pm
    TREBOR ... contracted employment for Permanent Heads of Commonwealth Government Departments effectively commenced with Gough Whitlam in 1972. It could be argued that the loss of senior management independence and the resultant sycophancy started from that era.
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    3:10pm
    I agree to a point Bob, if staffers are making the decisions they should be brought back into line but if they are merely the messengers carrying out the wishes of a Minister then I see nothing wrong with that.

    Contracted employees are a product of the 80's and were brought into being because of election promises to reduce the Public Service and thereby save the State/Nation money. Senior staff were allowed to "retire" on full pension and then came back as consultants on a higher pay. It worked back then and has continued to the present day. If you or I had the time, we could scan the various treasury documents, year on year, and see how wages are reduced but contractors are increasing.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:36pm
    Indeed - it crossed my mind that they had a duty to carry messages... perhaps they should live on tips.... carrying messages does not give the messenger authority unless they are ordered to ensure it is carried out, which in this case would be a misuse of the position of staffer.

    "Get a message to HQ - we've captured the whorehouse and the bar - we've got 'em on the run!"
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:45pm
    Thank you, KT - I believe you are right and Howard simply cemented it in place. I do argue against our current Government of Two parties....

    Each side fully understands the value of having the senior management in your pocket and a reduction in the division of powers by bringing the public service to heel.

    That's what pre-totalitarian regimes do, after all ....
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    3:45pm
    Thanks Bob, is there a difference between carrying a message to a head of department asking them to carry out the wishes of the Minister and asking a head of department if the Minister's wishes had been carried out? Surely some tasks should be delegated?

    And the old chestnut on carrying messages from WWI was the original message of "Send reinforcements, we're going to advance!" was a bit different when it eventually reached HQ: "Send three and fourpence, we're going to a dance". (Sorry to those who have grown up with decimal currency)
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:30pm
    Yes - I doubt anyone receiving a message would think the second was correct...
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:53pm
    I fort to add that we're consolidating on the whorehouse and bar and will hold our ground....
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:53pm
    .. that's forgot.. keyboarditis....
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    5:23pm
    Do you want three and fourpence?
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    6:08pm
    Jeez - can't buy a Mars bar with that these days...
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    7:23pm
    Might have to live on the inventory, OM... need some help.
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    8:08pm
    Thanks Bob, I fall into the category of the old guy who was told by his doctor that he would have to give up half of his sex life. "Which half", he said, "thinking about it or talking about it".
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    8:52pm
    Was just chatting about that with the ex - said I'd forgotten the ropes anyway..... still got the interest, but the flesh is weak...

    I was in a Woolies not long ago, picked up a long cucumber, held it up, and started singly softly, "Memories, like the things we used to have...".. Bloke nearby with his family cracked up.... his missus smiled...
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    8:53pm
    I blame auto correct - what the hell is this singly? It's singing!!
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    2:17pm
    Is the Public Service corrupt? Definitely not! Are there corrupt people within the Public Service? Absolutely! In all of the western world, regardless of whether it is in the public or private sector, there is corruption but it is limited to a very small percentage and in most cases the corrupt people are discovered and dealt with. The sad thing about discovering corrupt employees is that the headlines generally scream out that the whole (Public Service, Police Force, SES, Fire Brigade: add your own workplaces) is corrupt and places a cloud over the good, hardworking remainder.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    2:27pm
    True.
    Anne Ozzie
    12th Jan 2018
    2:46pm
    Once upon a time the public service was a fearless organisation, nowadays it has been severely politicized by successive Liberal Governments. We need an federal Independent Commission against Corruption for all public servants including Politicians, contractors, public service and police, etc - in fact anyone who is paid by or receives payment from the public purse. We need it constructed so the politicians cannot legislate to take themselves out of the loop as they have done in some states!
    Old Man
    12th Jan 2018
    3:26pm
    Gee Anne Ozzie, are you saying that Labor didn't appoint any heads of departments? Have you hears of the Fair Work Australia mob? How about appointing Coutts-Trotter as a head of department even though he was sentenced to 9 years gaol for the importation and distribution of heroin in 1986. According to Labor, that was a long time ago and he has learned his lesson and the fact that he is married to Plibersek has nothing to do with the decision. Just trying to balance the ledger.
    Knight Templar
    12th Jan 2018
    3:28pm
    Annie, you would be naive to assume that Labor governments aren't equally responsible for politicisation of Commonwealth, State and Territory public services.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:37pm
    Indeed, the Government of Two Parties is equally culpable in many ways over many things.
    Hobbit
    12th Jan 2018
    2:47pm
    I don't believe much cash changes hands, but I know a lot of corruption takes place in the form of special highly paid jobs or consultancies. A corruption watchdog is needed.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:10pm
    bureaucrats are excellent at being self-serving and at feathering their own nests. Like our LNP government politicians, these bums should be sacked.
    Knows-a-lot
    12th Jan 2018
    3:23pm
    Sorry - "Bureaucrats ...".
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    3:30pm
    Like TREBOR , can't put a sentence together must have a dull mind oh I forgot your on the welfare wagon so a loser.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    3:38pm
    Perhaps we like sporting with you.... how's the blood pressure going, old boy? Suck on a few more lemons, that might give your comments some bite.... put a bit of acid in them instead of them being laughing stocks.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    4:06pm
    No TREBOR I think you are like most left wingers not so bright. Lets see you left a public service pension to take on welfare your wife give you the boot and you haven't worked for twenty years because you have a sore back I would call that a complete an utter loser.

    Come down to Victoria we have legal euthanasia for people like you
    Dan Andrews is looking for his first candidate he will probably put you in a dress to send you off.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:15pm
    I left the PS and within two years was earning the same as the Sydney head of the department I had been working in in private enterprise ... not that it's any of your business.

    Legal euthanasia is more your bag, old boy.

    You know nothing about me, except that I'm better than you in every way, so kindly go your own way before you get yourself in trouble.

    Now stick to the issues raised, son.... grow a pair, and get with the program here.
    Anonymous
    12th Jan 2018
    4:27pm
    Well I really don't know what to say TREBOR you had that advantage and still get welfare need I say any more.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:28pm
    You are incapable of saying anything of value..... you may go now.
    TREBOR
    13th Jan 2018
    12:13am
    If you did have on single thing to say that had any value, Roby - you should thank me for my integrity in not taking something a man of honour could not and would not, while resigning a comfortable career over a matter of principle.

    I'm not like politicians who feel absolutely entitled to a massive salary for life.... I go out and earn my money and don't take a handout from anyone.
    OnlyGenuineRainey
    14th Jan 2018
    1:10pm
    Roby, I think the bureaucrats and politicians are far more in need of euthanasia than any derogatorily and nastily-branded ''welfare recipient''. In my experience, a large percentage of senior public servants and politicians are either corrupt or grossly inept, or both. And I would hasten to say we'd have far fewer struggling on welfare or otherwise doing it tough if only these stinking fat cats could do their jobs honestly and diligently.

    I've been the victim of more stuff-ups by idiots in government offices than I could list, and I know a lot of folk who would be quite well off if not for being victims of the arrogance and incompetence of moron bureaucrats or dishonest cretins who have no qualms about ruining other people's lives for profit.

    I spar a bit with Knows-a-lot, because he was grossly insulting and nasty to ne, but in fact I have every sympathy for anyone on a pension and I find it disgusting that anyone should denigrate someone for needing social services, because the reality, Roby, is that vast numbers who don't wouldn't know the meaning of honest, hard work. They boast now about their wealth, but in way too many instances it was acquired through dishonest activity, unethical manipulation, or disgraceful exploitation.

    The thing is, nobody who actually knows what honest, hard work is looks down on anyone on welfare, because knowing how hard it is to make a quid honestly and fairly, they recognize that vast numbers of battlers worked incredibly hard and sacrificed a great deal but were never properly rewarded for their efforts. In fact, those who work hardest and give most NEVER get a fair reward.

    Society used to recognize that a pension on retirement was part of a well-earned but inadequate reward for such folk. Now the rich are just too damned greedy to even recognize the contribution of battlers. It's just ''give me give me give me and give me again'' and then, having taken, they vilify those who didn't.
    Dot
    12th Jan 2018
    4:50pm
    I'm all for it. Long over due. One doesn't need a University Degree to see what's happening.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    4:54pm
    Youdn't need a university degree to be a pen pusher either... perhaps the greatest mistake by the PS was assuming that degrees meant the person actually knew something.
    Ductape
    12th Jan 2018
    5:21pm
    Trust the government? Anyone in Australia who does so, is a fool.
    Eddy
    12th Jan 2018
    6:17pm
    Public service corruption can take many forms, from being wined and dined to actual receipt of gifts. I once received a bottle of expensive single malt Scotch whiskey from a contractor, when I reported this to my boss he suggested I 'donate' it to the Xmas raffle which I did. The contractor concerned had no ulterior motive to give it to me as they already had the contract, it was merely a gift of appreciation.
    Another time I was on a tender review panel where a local company was highly regarded and well placed to get the contract. The Project Director quickly put the kybosh on a local tenderer as, and he was quite candid about it, there was no overseas trip in it for him. The contract went to an overseas company, they may well have got the contract anyway, and anyway the Project Director outranked me by several levels.
    I can also say that during my 48 years both in uniform and as a public servant most people took great pains to be scrupulously proper, but I only worked in one department.
    Boof
    12th Jan 2018
    8:52pm
    If YOU think it is not corrupt. You believe in Alice in Wonderland. Been corrupt for years. Be very hard to stop it, as certain practises are set in stone.
    TREBOR
    12th Jan 2018
    8:58pm
    The old adage that you go into government to organise business deals for yourself etc holds true..... look at Barnaby Joyce and buying up tracts of land along the proposed route of a high speed rail connection... nobody seems to think that is anything our of order, which shows how far down this nation has gone.

    There are countless other examples on both 'sides' of government - anywhere the government will be slinging billions of dollars, selves, mates, families and cronies get in on the ground floor. Look at childcare when that was just a proposal - who made millions out of that, setting up a chain in the certain knowledge that endless funds would flow that way?

    Corrupt to the top.... no wonder they won't support a Federal ICAC and some serious watch-dogs over everything they do.

    Like corn flakes competitions, family members etc should be excluded from participating in anything related to a government decision on spending a lot of money.

    What really appalls me is that these people do not view their actions as corrupt in any way - just business as usual.
    Gee Whiz
    13th Jan 2018
    8:45am
    Well of course the bureaucracy is corrupt. And has been for many, many years.

    But they are protected by their political masters because they are the most corrupt of all. And they need the protection of the bureaucracy to turn a blind eye to their corruption.

    A standing corruption watchdog is essential to reduce blatant corruption. They will never stop it entirely because the greed of politicians will find new and more sly ways of stealing public funds.

    But a corruption commission would be a good start. But can I say don't hold your breath. A commission has to be set up by,--- yes you guessed it politicians.


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