Could COVID-19 spell the end of cash?

With so many vendors refusing cash payments, we could see a cashless society soon.

Could COVID-19 spell the end of cash?

The spread of the novel coronavirus has forced many retailers to ask customers to look after staff health and forgo cash payments in favour of cards.

Tap and go is the way to go in these troubling times.

Does this mean we are seeing the start of a cashless society?

Some countries are already well on the way to becoming completely cashless.

Sweden is already on the verge of becoming the world’s first completely cashless society.

The Reserve Bank of Australia’s New Payment Platform (NPP) makes electronic payments faster and easier and brings Australia into line with the rest of a world increasingly heading towards cashless systems.

Some money experts predicted that Australia could become a completely cashless society by the end of 2020.

Six months ago, that may have seemed a far-fetched idea. However, with the spread of COVID-19 and the many vendors now refusing cash payments, and the widespread and increasing use of tap-and-go payment channels and other digital transactions, we could see a cashless way of life a lot sooner.

According to a report in UK newspaper The Telegraph, the World Health Organization (WHO) was pushing people towards contactless payment options “because infectious COVID-19 may cling to the surface [of cash] for a number of days”.

However, WHO spokesperson Fadela Chaib said the organisation was “misrepresented”, asserting it “did NOT say that cash was transmitting coronavirus”.

“We were asked if we thought banknotes could transmit COVID-19 and we said you should wash your hands after handling money, especially if handling or eating food,” said the spokesperson.

Small Caps has already predicted that “governments would use the coronavirus pandemic to their advantage to start the transition to digital currencies among passing draconian laws on its citizens”.

Cash has been on the way out for some time.

Australia has already considered removing the $100 note from circulation and banning cash transactions over $10,000.

Welfare payments in some areas are only made available via cashless systems.

According to a 2016 Reserve Bank of Australia survey, 37 per cent of respondents made payments in cash, compared to 69 per cent a decade earlier. The RBA says that “the share of cash transactions is likely to have declined further since”.

The number of ATM withdrawals in Australia has fallen by an average of five per cent per year since 2013.

“The reduced use of cash for transactions over the past decade largely reflects consumers preferring to use debit and credit cards for their in-person payments, including for lower-value payments,” said the RBA.

China wants to introduce a full digital currency system that would see digital tokens swapped with the current Yuan currency.

The US last week offered a $US2.5 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill that could lead to the implementation of a digital dollar.

Central banks in the European Union, South Korea, Canada, Russia, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Singapore, and Switzerland have been exploring the introduction of digital currency.

While many may lament the loss of cash, some say a cashless society will be safer, simpler and more efficient.

Governments the world over claim that getting rid of cash would help with policing the black economy and recouping billions of dollars in unpaid taxes.

However, with a cashless society comes the potential loss of personal freedom and privacy.

Accounts can be hacked. Cash cannot. Authorities may also be able to cut you off from your own finances or take your financial assets for many reasons and access to your money would be dependent on technology.

Many people also find it easier to control their finances with cash.

Combined Pensioners and Superannuants Association (CPSA) spokesperson Paul Versteege also believes that older Australians are anxious of such change. And, considering hacker activity and online fraud is on the rise, he may have a point.

How do you feel about a cashless society?

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    COMMENTS

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    Mac
    1st Apr 2020
    4:13pm
    What happens if technology breaks down? Remember recently that the EFTPOS system in a supermarket shut down unexpectedly and no one use their card to pay for their purchases.

    There seem to be many instances where you have to pay in cash. Hopefully cash will not become redundant as there is a lot of older people, including me, who prefer to use it.

    It is a false assumption that everyone uses the internet/computer/Ipad/iPhone - mostly due being unable to afford it.
    Greg
    1st Apr 2020
    4:49pm
    There has always been fallback procedures in place when the network is down. They don't use it as they are concerned about frauds but if we were cashless they would again use the fallback system.

    The fallback system allows the retailer to process the transaction up to a certain amount, was $100 years ago, and the transaction is sent through when the network is running again. Sometimes means overdrawn accounts but that's the price to pay for efficiency.
    Anonymous
    1st Apr 2020
    4:55pm
    When the technology breaks down they just got your money.

    The following is one of the reasons for coronavirus and to shut down peoples protests ;
    Protests in Wuhan - https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-china-blog-48904350
    Rae
    2nd Apr 2020
    8:23am
    Sort of efficiency privatisation didn't achieve I expect.

    Control the money and you control the people. Who exactly owns the World Banking System? Is it still the Rothchilds?
    jaycee1
    2nd Apr 2020
    1:29pm
    Greg it is a fallacy that when the network is down there is a fallback system in place. When the cashless society comes in ALL people receiving a 'welfare' payment [which includes Age Pensioners] will be forced onto the Indue Cashless Credit Card where you have LIMITED say on which shops you can use. Indue tells you where you can go and what you are allowed to buy. This does NOT include second hand stores, Gumtree, ebay etc. It also does not include 99% of small businesses in your community.

    90% of the people forced onto the Indue card are now in debt. Quite a few of them have lost their homes/cars/furniture etc due to Indue NOT paying the bills on time. Kids are unable to go on school trips as schools are not on the list of acceptable places to use the card. People have problems buying school uniforms [not on Indue list] or for that matter FOOD because the card crashes for NO REASON.

    it was a proven fact that robberies skyrocketed in areas that had the Indue cards during the bushfires. NONE on the cards were able to access money to buy anything because the system was down. It will be the same during this crisis as well.

    I don't know about you but for 60+ years my finances have been managed perfectly well. No debts, DON'T do drugs, drink or gamble excessively - in fact a very boring life.
    I do NOT see why someone else should have access to my PRIVATE information and send me into debt because the government is in bed with private enterprise.

    it is frankly insulting!!!!
    FrankC
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:07pm
    What is an Indue card, and what state has that ?
    Mac
    1st Apr 2020
    4:13pm
    What happens if technology breaks down? Remember recently that the EFTPOS system in a supermarket shut down unexpectedly and no one use their card to pay for their purchases.

    There seem to be many instances where you have to pay in cash. Hopefully cash will not become redundant as there is a lot of older people, including me, who prefer to use it.

    It is a false assumption that everyone uses the internet/computer/Ipad/iPhone - mostly due being unable to afford it.
    fish head
    1st Apr 2020
    4:14pm
    In the current situation, the tap-and-go makes sense.I experimented with my current coins in a Dettol bath. The resulting soup was mind blowing. More to the point, how do you stay currently aware of EXACTLY how much money you have to spend? Are we going to go around notebook in hand Plusing and Minusing? With cash in hand you know how much you have to spend. Might I suggest this is where people who only use cards get into trouble with money. You must know your limits. Denny , you make a good point. My daughter has run into the same problem with her carer. Her bank does not want to know.
    Greg
    1st Apr 2020
    4:53pm
    I never use cash, only have $40 in case, use cards constantly without budgeting issues.

    It's better than cash - cash you end up with coins here and there which can add up, with cards you have a record of every transaction, no lost coins, no coins forgotten about, just every transaction which you can look at every day if you want to see ho you are going with that budget.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    5:08pm
    The problem is also that everyone else has the possibility of looking at where you spent your money not just yourself Greg. That worries me.
    hyperbole
    1st Apr 2020
    7:05pm
    be lots of worried people...cannot hide the money under the mattress
    Gra
    1st Apr 2020
    4:17pm
    How about just reporting on the facts instead of trying to make something out of nothing.
    JO
    1st Apr 2020
    4:28pm
    Recently into Sweden for 6 weeks, not used cash once. Even at markets they use a simply easy system called Swish.Notice to customers at some fuel stations for cash you pay a surcharge. I believe banks charge business for cash management. You can always have a seperate card with limited cash on to give use to another, we did this for grandson.It was great way to operate. If suits all receipts are sent to your phone, no bits of paper.
    AutumnOz
    1st Apr 2020
    4:39pm
    I've been in isolation for the last six weeks and the lady who brought my shopping paid using her card and I gave her cash to cover the bill. Interestingly there was an extra amount added to the bill because a card was used, I wasn't aware of the charges because I pay cash for my groceries when shopping.
    Going cashless sounds like another excuse for banks to charge us extra for using the cards. Most people I know put a certain amount away each fortnight in envelopes to pay for the phone, electricity, gas etc. when the bills come in.
    Greg
    1st Apr 2020
    4:56pm
    Extra charge? Was that Aldi? They charge on credit cards but not debit cards.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    5:11pm
    Yes they do, unless you override the tap card, push savings and then you have to touch the buttons anyway for your PIN.
    Sen.Cit.90
    1st Apr 2020
    5:19pm
    Greg,
    Wrong comment, I only have a 'Debit Card' and Aldi charge me for using it tapping.
    If your prepared to use your pin drawing from savings there is no charge on cards.
    Rae
    2nd Apr 2020
    8:29am
    It will be a shame I can't buy at Alfdi and many places after this but I simply refuse to pay extra tax to merchants for shopping. I use the word tax as it scares people more than the word fee for some odd reason. It's the same thing though.
    Mariner
    2nd Apr 2020
    10:36am
    Rae - just come back from Aldi shop and I had no problems with paying cash, was quicker than the people in front of me fiddling with their cards and PIN as they did not want to pay the Visa or Master fee.
    FrankC
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:18pm
    What annoys me is the number of people who get to the checkout, and then when the amount comes up, they get out their wallet/purse, and fiddle around trying to ge the card out, then realise they have the wrong one, then they put the card in and tap the number whicht they have to remember. Why not get your card out while the girl is scanning your items, also another reason for tap and go cards, unless you spend over a $100.
    Rod63
    1st Apr 2020
    4:41pm
    It's going to happen - and a good thing too.
    The current situation may speed it along.
    Pass the Ductape
    2nd Apr 2020
    4:41am
    'Speed it along' - I hope not.
    Speed it along brings to mind the the time wasting process of standing in line while people fumble through their bag looking for their credit card - or cards as the case may be - looking for the one that works! You'd think they'd have the damn things ready to go, but no...... still inside the wallet or purse which is again, often down somewhere deep in the bowels of another carry bag.
    Then, once the thing is finally discovered, waiting agonizingly for the pin numbers to be entered and again waiting for the flammin' machine to complete the transaction - that's if its working.
    Grrrrrr - Please - I'm old - time is short - I have no time for this nonsense - can't I simply hand over the cash so I can get out of here!
    And people need to be aware how governments will use the credit card only situation as another way to know their business and keep them in line - because like it or not - that's what governments love to do.
    Tap and go - yes - really handy for the criminal element who find your card if you lose it! They'll be 'tapping and going' every day - right up until the time you discover it missing.

    And as far as the Covid 19 debacle is concerned....I wonder how many people a day touch the numbers on the credit card terminal? A damn site more than would touch the fifty dollar note, I hand over for payment I bet!
    101
    2nd Apr 2020
    2:52pm
    I don't touch any credit card terminals, I just tap & go.
    tisme
    1st Apr 2020
    4:47pm
    i dont trust computers
    Greg
    1st Apr 2020
    4:56pm
    Hahaha
    thommo
    2nd Apr 2020
    5:25pm
    you just used one!!!
    m52
    1st Apr 2020
    4:49pm
    Cash and coins are the worst carrier of illness.
    Briar
    2nd Apr 2020
    5:54pm
    You do know that our notes are plastic so they are washable, don't you??
    BERRYUPSET
    1st Apr 2020
    4:52pm
    Control in a cashless society SMACKS of BIG BROTHER to me !aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh
    aussiecarer
    1st Apr 2020
    4:59pm
    The Royal Australian mint and the world health organization say that cash can't carry coronavirus. https://www.ramint.gov.au/news-media/news/cash-usage-regarding-covid-19?fbclid=IwAR1UJVvXTRyn6EoEe2FfrXfCaA0tqQtzYEZfrQCBWYJsCsHQu95wOsdHJQI
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    5:04pm
    I have mixed feelings on the matter. Probably 99% (by value) of our spending is by card but I like cash for small purchases, when a tradesman does me a favour and I want to give him something for his trouble cash is the only way and when the systems go down as they frequently do and they can't process cards. On the other hand I cannot understand why service stations and other exposed businesses which receive large amounts of cash and are vulnerable don't either insist on card payments (as they do in some European countries) or charge extra for cash not for cards as some do. I'd be happier to see the end of cheques rather than cash, I haven't written one for years and when I (rarely) receive one its a damned nuisance as it involves a drive to the bank which is not close by.
    Triss
    1st Apr 2020
    6:41pm
    I was in a shop a couple of weeks ago when a man in front of me wanted to pay cash for a $50 item “We don’t take cash,” he was told, snootily.
    “OK,” he said and started to walk away. She took his cash.
    ex PS
    1st Apr 2020
    9:24pm
    It is a free choice issue, I mainly use my card, but I should have the option of using cash if I choose to.
    I remember when we transitioned to electronic bank transfers for payrolls, we were promised that we would never be charged fees for transactions, we all know how that worked out.
    Rae
    2nd Apr 2020
    8:37am
    Yes ex PS and let's call the fees extra taxes because that always gets people going. We hate taxes and yet the privately owned banking systems charge us plenty just to receive, buy and sell using our own income. They have us exactly where they want . Completely under control and at their mercy.
    ex PS
    7th Apr 2020
    1:23pm
    Rae, that is a very good comparison. We need to remember that financial institutions are there to make money not friends.
    WillyBilby
    1st Apr 2020
    5:10pm
    Mariner, with all respect, please engage in thorough on-line research before quoting that idiot Trump. This is not a Chinese flu, scientists have proven it was developed in a lab in the USA !. Facts available at veteranstoday.com
    It was then taken to Wuhan by a so-called US military sports team, "patient one" has been identified as a female member of that team. They stayed in a hotel a few hundred metres from the 'wet market' last October. It is 'made in the USA'.
    As for a cashless society, this is obviously Big Brother tactics allowing Govt total control.
    Unfortunately the younger generations have not yet realised this, asd so many of them think it's a great idea not to have to carry a wallet. Perhaps they will realise after a week-long power failure.
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    5:40pm
    Well that bull-shit kind of back fired even if it was true, the US now has more cases of the virus than any other country in the world with 200,000 deaths expected and it will probably wreck their economy more than the Chinese. Perhaps the Chinese also planted it back in the US and ensured they had a mentally retarded President too!
    AutumnOz
    1st Apr 2020
    6:02pm
    Bilby, China announced some time ago that the new Corona virus was brought to Wuhan by two Americans. It seems that announcement wasn't fake news.
    hyperbole
    1st Apr 2020
    7:10pm
    fake news
    ex PS
    1st Apr 2020
    9:28pm
    So what are we going to do next about this filthy American Virus?
    Is the USA going to pay reparations to the rest of the world?
    101
    2nd Apr 2020
    7:06pm
    Oh no the nut jobs are out again.
    Here are some more conspiracy theories peddled by nut jobs.
    Zika crisis of 2015 was blamed on everything from vaccinations to genetically engineered mosquitoes.
    HIV was created in a US biological weapons laboratory at Fort Detrick in the US state of Maryland
    Some theories claim that COVID-19 is a population control scheme or a top-secret spy operation gone wrong.
    It has been blamed Wuhan’s recent rollout of 5G Wi-Fi.
    It's all a cash grab by big pharmaceutical companies.
    It's not easy to rationalise these conspiracy theories because "Lies travel faster than facts and, perversely, efforts to debunk a conspiracy theory can end up reinforcing it."

    But people if you don't stop you will go blind.
    WillyBilby
    3rd Apr 2020
    6:25pm
    The Care Bear - conspiracy theory ?. Before rattling off the conspiracy theory dribble, access the site and evaluate the credentials of the editors and contributors.
    The FBI, CIA, renowned Intel agencies and various world governments seek advice from the senior editors in regard to world Intel matters.

    How often do they actively seek your advice ???.

    In regard to the incidents you have mentioned, no, they are not conspiracy !. I do agree that it is a cash grab by the pharmaceuticals, since they are actively involved in this deliberate pandemic.
    As I have stated, do your research, you just might learn the facts - at
    veteranstoday.com
    WillyBilby
    1st Apr 2020
    5:14pm
    Mariner, my apologies, I mistakenly directed the comments to you, but they were relpying to Denny. Again, my apologies.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    5:20pm
    No probs with me, I get you.
    Jaz
    1st Apr 2020
    5:15pm
    It has already been proven that Australia's cash is every bit as safe as plastic cards so why would we need to go cashless in favour of something that is completely restrictive and no safer at all. If our government uses this as an excuse to foist a cashless society on us we will be at the mercy of banks and government who will then be able to do whatever they like with OUR resources including appropriating our money if they wish to do so as evidenced by the banks sneaky "bail in" availability which is now trying to be changed through parliament and has been stopped by this virus business. A government willing to sell out our country to foreign ownership cannot fully be trusted I'm afraid.
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    5:28pm
    Jaz I don't agree. If I go to a butcher or baker who while they may be wearing gloves needs to handle cash and food it is not hygienic at any time, virus or no virus. When I used a card only I touch my car it has to be cleaner.
    Triss
    1st Apr 2020
    6:54pm
    When we all use only cards, Spartan, watch the banks pile on the fees and there’ll be nothing we can do about it.
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    8:38pm
    Triss, I've been using a credit card for nearly 60 years with no charges or tap and go fees so when does your conspiracy kick in?
    Triss
    1st Apr 2020
    11:52pm
    I'll let you know.
    Pass the Ductape
    2nd Apr 2020
    5:00am
    Right on Triss - once the process gets to the point of becoming truly irreversible - watch them go at it! A perk the government would like to offer the banks as recompense for the way they were forced to comply with conditions imposed in the recent royal commission!
    Rae
    2nd Apr 2020
    8:47am
    The Government does exactly as the banks tell them. Since 1913 Central Bank control over the monetary system means the World Bank, BIS, IMF and Central Banks are the power behind everything and control the people through the use of banking services and debt.
    Mariner
    2nd Apr 2020
    9:19am
    Spartan - Bankcard only came in just after the Whitlam administration, nowhere near 60 years, they had no fees but certainly weren't tap cards. Of course you might have had one of those Amex cards only high income people qualified for and they were certainly not free of charges. Bankcards were good without the connections to Visa and Master, however they were a domestic card only, could not even use it in NZ.
    Mondo
    2nd Apr 2020
    10:53am
    Mariner, Australia was a relatively late adopter of credit cards I didn't live in Australia nearly 60 years ago or may I should more accurately have said well over 50 years ago. I didn't say tap and go which I rarely use was available then but credit cards without user fees were. There's a simple way if you want to benefit from what some regard as bank excesses, buy bank shares they are cheap at the moment.
    Mondo
    2nd Apr 2020
    11:09am
    Triss, I didn't say I only used a credit card, I do use cash but less than I use a card. I said above I have mixed feeling about the matter. My long term experience is that using a credit card provides more financial and convenience benefits than it costs. If others don't then do what suits, I am stating my experience only. I've had a number of situations where traders did not deliver or perform and my bank has always stopped and reversed the credit card payment, try doing that with cash? If so many people are concerned about the power of the banks why then do they keep voting in a political party which so many claim is in bed with the banks?
    Beemee
    7th Apr 2020
    6:43pm
    Good grief, there is NO corona virus being passed via money. It sticks like flies to fly paper to the hard surfaces not floppy paper rubbish.

    Geez we think we have it bad, spare a thought for those in the UK (have family there on hubby's side) and I am getting the full run down on the real and serious food shortages.
    Jaz
    1st Apr 2020
    5:15pm
    It has already been proven that Australia's cash is every bit as safe as plastic cards so why would we need to go cashless in favour of something that is completely restrictive and no safer at all. If our government uses this as an excuse to foist a cashless society on us we will be at the mercy of banks and government who will then be able to do whatever they like with OUR resources including appropriating our money if they wish to do so as evidenced by the banks sneaky "bail in" availability which is now trying to be changed through parliament and has been stopped by this virus business. A government willing to sell out our country to foreign ownership cannot fully be trusted I'm afraid.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    5:24pm
    If they do away with cash I shall buy gold - problem with that it is too large for transactions, in that case foreign cash might be an option, Japanese Yen maybe. Remember we almost had to use them in 1940+.
    hyperbole
    1st Apr 2020
    7:11pm
    be a lot harder to sleep on ..gold bars!
    Karen
    1st Apr 2020
    8:21pm
    I remember when I was a kid the Japanese invasion currency was doing the rounds - should've kept a few.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    9:48pm
    hyperbole - the bars I have seen at the Perth Mint for sale were rather flat and like a few credit cards glued together. On TV I have seen whopper ones like Toblerone choccies and I do not think we can buy them.
    Horace Cope
    1st Apr 2020
    5:20pm
    We hope that cash will continue. We both grew up in the era where there were pay packets with cash and no credit cards. Because of that we, like all our vintage, know how to budget and cash is the essential part of that. We read of people who cannot work out where their money has gone and it's no surprise that they use "tap'n'go" which has no real check on how much is actually being spent each pay period.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    5:29pm
    Use tap card but only for credit card purchases, a bit more at the moment because merchants insist on it. Noticed though in some bars they added 1.65% on the bill last February in Melbourne. Cash in the pocket shows you when it is time to go home from the club or pub. Not at the moment, mind you
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    5:31pm
    Horace. The advantage of tap and go, swipe or insert is that you can see exactly where your money has gone as you can check it online at any time and if you want to print out a statement each month. You cant do that with cash!
    Horace Cope
    1st Apr 2020
    5:46pm
    That's OK Spartan but my point is that with cash, as Mariner points out, once your pocket or purse is empty, it's time to stop spending. Your idea has merit but it's harder to keep track whilst shopping or socialising on how much has been actually spent.
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    6:04pm
    Horace, but when you can see where its gone you know where you wasted it so not to do it ever again. Then you have saved money to spare and don't need to worry about empty pockets. I started that 50 years ago and paid off a 20 year mortgage in two and a half years as a result so I know it works. Yes I've had a credit card for nearly 60 years and I find its the best way to manage and save money, the Spartan ethic!
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    6:18pm
    PS, I hope cash continues too but I don't have problems with cards. I'm not suggesting that you do either but I really don't support the conspiracies that anyone is employing thousands of people to pour over our every transaction to control our lives. In fact to the detriment of our economy and situations like now when people should have some funds in reserve, the government of the day from at least Howard onwards has encouraged people to go out and spend to support the ludicrous number of shops we have selling total rubbish, most of it from China.
    Mootnell
    1st Apr 2020
    6:19pm
    Spartan how or what on earth do you think any budget is developed for? If you allow $100 cash spending for the night when it’s all gone, you go home.
    Not so Tap and go, It is a license to waste your money without limit. Nor is there any financial advantage to using tap and go.
    We all survived without it quite well for many years, that is until the banks thought of away to relieve you of your money more quickly. Enter tap and go.
    I’ve never yet not been able to print a statement from any account that does not show my exact financial spending, so I’m perplexed as to your belief you can’t view cash expenditures as easily as tap and go.
    Mondo
    1st Apr 2020
    6:38pm
    Mootnell, well maybe there are some big differences between you and me (I hope there are) and how we spend our money. I rarely go out at night to spend $100 and if I did It wouldn't trouble me how much it was if it was value for money. You see through thrift I don't have to worry much about money. My credit card repays me $4-5 for every dollar it costs me to maintain it and I pay no ATM or tap and go fees. I don't understand how you get a detailed itemised account of every dollar that you spend in cash in fact I don't believe you do or can.
    Triss
    1st Apr 2020
    6:48pm
    A very true saying...Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.
    Viking
    1st Apr 2020
    8:10pm
    Spartan, I'm with you 100% as I do much the same. My betting is that you weren't born in Australia, knew how to get by with little, saw how much many Australians wasted money saving little and investing none. All you need to do in life is study hard, be smart in choosing a career; work hard work smart, save hard and nvest smart and you're set for life. I agree if people developed resilience, instead of relying on the State, took responsibility for their own lives and saved to build up some reserves, the country wouldn't be in the poo we're in at the moment.
    Triss
    1st Apr 2020
    11:56pm
    Yes, Viking, study hard, be smart in choosing a career; work hard work smart... and now the most secure job is stacking shelves in a supermarket. Gotta laugh.
    Mookie
    1st Apr 2020
    5:52pm
    What is spreading this COVID 19 is peoples stupidity , for instance workers nationwide in high volume places such as supermarkets not wearing gloves with management saying to coles workers wash your hands every hour ,

    Im sorry but it is incompetant ,
    Washing hands with soap only works if you catch the virus on you straight away

    I when i go shopping i out on gloves which i found easy to obtain on Ebay , regardless what media want you to believe masks , gloves etc are all easily obtained online and much safer than supermarkets , bunnings etc...

    I as well disinfect my groceries when i get then home , why are not retaliers disinfecting products they are selling as well as stuff delivered through ebay

    This virus was on surfaces 17 days later on those cruise ships after emptying

    South korea has the right idea clean everything
    You are likely to get this from surfaces than from anywhere else

    Its obvious
    Mookie
    1st Apr 2020
    5:54pm
    Why can retailers not disinfect the money and wear gloves , it is a copout they dont accept cash
    Mootnell
    1st Apr 2020
    5:56pm
    Well the youth have already been conditioned to go cashless. The pity is they have swapped their freedoms for the ‘ease’ of not carrying cash. Imagine every single thing you spend can be questioned and scrutinised by every government department they allow. Worse, it’s a short step to them telling everyone where you can spend it. Remember they are already doing this in some areas under the guise of stopping support money being spent wantonly on declared u desirable items.
    The cashless society will be The end of democratic freedom to how you conduct your life. Scare tactic, after scare tactic, divide and conquer and all the time changing laws behind your back. Like Lemmings to the slaughter and See the rise of the barter system. The more you try and control people the more the will resist. Bring on a massive satellite crash and expose the vulnerabilities of such a foolish cashless idea.
    Meanwhile would someone tell all viruses and bacteria not to go on the cash machines and receipts. The amount of idiots falling for this pedalled rubbish is mind numbing.
    bobm
    1st Apr 2020
    7:09pm
    Tap and Go. The Banks don't anything for nothing. Have a look at you bank statement on the internet and you will find a fee.
    Hackers will love this. You don't need to be a hacker to rip people off.
    My son noticed money going in and out of his account. As a student working for Maccas he want ed to save for a car. This money in and out. We stopped his account and withdrew all of his money, the Bank demanded he had to pay the shortfall in his account as the Bank Jonnie was in the middle of a withdrawl. We arranged to be at the Bank after 5 pm, the only time both could be at the Bank. The Bank handed a document showing he had a loan and had listed all the repayments he had to make. After the Bank Jonnie explained what we had to do, I placed the cash in front of him. All the timed safes were shut thus he had cash and could not put it thro the Banking system.
    My friend was a Bank Auditor of that Bank. We arranged that he arrive at the bank before the time opened the safe and started an audit. He found the Bank Jonnie was using my son's account to shift money from other accounts thro the Banking system. The Bank Jonnie noticed that this account had not been touched and thought he could rip the bank off thro this account. He had plenty of time to think about what he did with a 4 yr holiday at the governments pleasure in goal.
    No body looks after your money like your self.
    Bren
    1st Apr 2020
    7:35pm
    Horace Cope check it out : the Spanish flu by no means originated in Spain. They did however get lumbered with the 'label'.
    Bren
    1st Apr 2020
    7:35pm
    Horace Cope check it out : the Spanish flu by no means originated in Spain. They did however get lumbered with the 'label'.
    Karen
    1st Apr 2020
    8:23pm
    I watched a video on the 1918 flu and they said it started in a few US Army bases..... not sure how it got there and then spread though...
    Rae
    2nd Apr 2020
    8:55am
    When in doubt blame the Americans. It's like blaming Labor in Australia right.
    FrankC
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:23pm
    I was sayinmg to my wife only this morning, "How did it kill 50 million people when transpaortation was not as it is now, no planes carrying 4-6 hundred people at a time going all over the world in a matter of hours
    skinner
    1st Apr 2020
    8:09pm
    The cashless society is not something I welcome! I much prefer to use cash & not all places are fully electronic. Cash is king with my family & I. I refuse to give my details to anyone which is what may happen if cash isn't used.
    Karen
    1st Apr 2020
    8:24pm
    Joe at the coffee shop won't like cards only... what about your motor mechanic or your tradie?
    Briar
    4th Apr 2020
    5:42pm
    Totally agree skinner. I shop local and use small business as much as I can, avoiding the big multi nationals as much as possible. I like to pay cash as they then don't have to pay a fee to process my online payment, and I am putting my dollars back into my local community.
    skinner
    1st Apr 2020
    8:09pm
    The cashless society is not something I welcome! I much prefer to use cash & not all places are fully electronic. Cash is king with my family & I. I refuse to give my details to anyone which is what may happen if cash isn't used.
    Karen
    1st Apr 2020
    8:12pm
    In a cashless society all transactions can be monitored and controlled... public policy can be designed and implemented using data 'mined' from people's spending - this can lead to demands being placed by government - always for 'good' reasons - for control over the individual and his/her personal choices - i.e. personal sovereignty.

    This is a sign of a dictatorial and oppressive of the individual society - not of a free society, and it matters not which 'side' of politics this demand is coming from. Never forget that St Bob of The Hawke wanted a 'cashless economy and a classless society' - success so far on on, since there is little class left.

    Not only that, but all such data 'mined' can be sold to various groups, such as insurance companies, healthcare provider companies, and such, and can be used to determine an individual's 'suitability' for any insurance and coverage etc... again this is a vile intrusion into the personal sovereignty of the individual.

    As soon as The Fear dies down - go back to using cash as a matter of principle. I paid cash for 3-4 objects yesterday - no good having it in your bag doing nothing.
    Priscilla
    1st Apr 2020
    8:25pm
    Defiinitely NOT ready for a cashless society! Sadly the use of cards attracts fees which the use of cash does not. Some cards can charge $600 a year. People need to wake up to this rip off!
    Viking
    1st Apr 2020
    8:31pm
    Yes I agree when there are plenty of lower and no annual fee credit cards and numerous debit cards totally free. If anyone pays $600 pa without at least double that amount in benefits they need a power of attorney over them.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    9:38pm
    If you want the bells and whistles, Priscilla, you will pay more, I have one with a major bank and get charged $30 a year, no points, bonuses, insurances etc. Quite happy with that.
    Pass the Ductape
    2nd Apr 2020
    5:16am
    Mariner says - 'Quite happy with that'.... And there-in lies the rub innit!
    cupoftea
    1st Apr 2020
    8:46pm
    I have hardly used cash in the last 5yrs I know exactly what it costs me daily,weekly,monthly,yearly so I know what it will cost me to live I don't have to pay some to tell me what I already know
    DaveL
    1st Apr 2020
    8:58pm
    Bring it on. Bunnings will go broke not to ba able to sell home safes.
    Mariner
    1st Apr 2020
    9:43pm
    Who says it is cash in those safes? Lots of people have heirlooms and assorted valuables to put away. Never really wanted anything of that stuff myself but people with family do have rings and pendants from granny etc. If you do not have a safe I suppose the insurance people will not want to cover you. Bunnings is quite Ok I think. But I did not know they were selling safes.
    Boomah52
    1st Apr 2020
    11:42pm
    McDonalds, cinemas and the like and ofcourse Smartgate all require touching a screen lol. Cash is a tangible thing you can hold and use... I would have thought it sensible in times like now to have some extra cash... power supply could be affected... we're rooted lol.
    Teacher
    2nd Apr 2020
    2:11am
    I have come through with computing right from the start. I learned on a mainframe and taught computing for 20 odd years at TAFE. I know the pitfalls - and there are many. The biggest one in mind is what happens if the global computing collapses. How do we survive without being able to pay for food? Take the Centrelink computer crashes recently for instance. We wouldn't even be able to buy any toilet paper (that is, if you could get any). The other biggie is computer fraud. If hackers can get into Swiss banks they can get in anywhere. Little people like me cannot afford to lose their fortnightly pension when they have no monetary backups. Also, you need to own and be able to fluently use a mobile phone to do your e-banking and for a lot of old people that would be difficult. Also, I like to feel and touch things I am going to purchase and inspect information on packages etc. so that is not possible if you are ordering on-line which is where you would probably be if it all goes electronic. Think of how many jobs would be lost too if owners sit in their warehouses and process everything by computer. So for me it is not on!
    Teacher
    2nd Apr 2020
    2:11am
    I have come through with computing right from the start. I learned on a mainframe and taught computing for 20 odd years at TAFE. I know the pitfalls - and there are many. The biggest one in mind is what happens if the global computing collapses. How do we survive without being able to pay for food? Take the Centrelink computer crashes recently for instance. We wouldn't even be able to buy any toilet paper (that is, if you could get any). The other biggie is computer fraud. If hackers can get into Swiss banks they can get in anywhere. Little people like me cannot afford to lose their fortnightly pension when they have no monetary backups. Also, you need to own and be able to fluently use a mobile phone to do your e-banking and for a lot of old people that would be difficult. Also, I like to feel and touch things I am going to purchase and inspect information on packages etc. so that is not possible if you are ordering on-line which is where you would probably be if it all goes electronic. Think of how many jobs would be lost too if owners sit in their warehouses and process everything by computer. So for me it is not on!
    Ed
    2nd Apr 2020
    6:58am
    No cash= No freedom
    Koro
    2nd Apr 2020
    9:15am
    I have read your article and find it very interesting. Young people are very competent with technology and put it in practice as a matter of routine in just about every aspect of their life. However, what about the senior/elderly members of our society who are not tech savvy at all and even struggle with mobile phones, computers etc? Agree with Mac 200% in respect of technology breaking down and the chaos it would cause in everyday living needs. Well said Mac - isn't it time the powers that be consider ALL the population and not just the younger ones. There are still a lot of over 60's who will be around a long time and have been the stalwarts of our country for a lifetime. Fair go for everyone and deep consideration when considering when making changes to everyday life.
    Koro
    2nd Apr 2020
    9:22am
    I must add that I am 77 years old and use tap and go as a matter of routine in most instances but also use cash in certain circumstances. Cannot use tap and go on the phone when placing some orders for goods and paying some household bills. While I am nowhere near the level of competency of our younger generation in using technology, I do endeavour to update skills in this area much more than some are able to do in my generation for whatever personal reasons and am still concerned for my fellow seniors in regard to these issues.
    scratch
    2nd Apr 2020
    9:22am
    If people are worried about handling cash, what is wrong with wearing rubber gloves?
    Cash gives people choice without Big Brother looking over their shoulder!
    Florgan
    2nd Apr 2020
    12:35pm
    No
    No
    No
    A bad idea
    If the power is out -you can’t pay for your goods just like over Xmas 19/20 with the bushfires
    Other countries have already proved that it does not stem illegal cash behaviour.
    Viking
    2nd Apr 2020
    2:00pm
    If the system goes down in any major store, supermarket, Bunnings, K mart, big W and probably the fast food people you still can't use cash because they can't scan and price the stuff you want to buy so don't kid yourselves that cash is the saviour. I still like cash, lots of it but like it or not life will become increasingly difficult for those who resist card payments. If that's what you want go for it. It's not only the banks moving that way, the people who make vending machines and automated systems are rapidly moving that way because its electronic not mechanical and cards are universal cash isn't.
    Dancer
    2nd Apr 2020
    3:34pm
    Using cards constantly, as I have been recently, means that I do not know how much money I have in the bank account. With cash I know exactly how much I have to spend, and can control my spending much easier. It's no wonder that people get into financial strife when they constantly "tap and go" - they don't take receipts, and don't know how much money is left in the account at any one time (unless they check on line banking - but that's another issue again. All of this is removing our right to choice, privacy about how we spend out money, and leaving us more susceptible to hacking our bank accounts.
    Listen up Politicians, Bankers and all others who want to take away our freedom of choice to use cash.
    Briar
    2nd Apr 2020
    5:43pm
    There is a place for both cash and EFTPOS in society. I pay most regular bills online and budget for this, but for just about everything else I use cash. And no I don't have squillions in a safe or under the mattress, I just prefer to work with cash on a weekly basis as I know exactly what I have to spend. Along the lines of when the wallet/purse is empty I can't spend any more. I am living on a very tight budget these days and using cash seems to work better than the "tap and go" method.
    BillF2
    2nd Apr 2020
    6:10pm
    The cashless society allows governments to check on every financial transaction you make, to know exactly how much money you have. It is a method of population control - the hallmark of a totalitarian society. It will give give unscrupulous governments or their agents the power to turn off your access to goods and services by making your card unacceptable at ATMs or retailers.
    Apart from that, the weak link in the system is electricity. When that fails, the whole system falls flat on its face. Something any potential enemy would not be unaware of.
    Briar
    2nd Apr 2020
    6:42pm
    Totally agree with you there Bill. The Australian government is trying to slyly bring in this "no cash over $10,000" purchases saying they are trying to shut down the black market. I actually see this as just one more step into banning cash so they can track us all.

    My Dad (would be 100 now if he was alive), always distrusted banks and kept cash in the house and paid for everything with cash as he said 20 years ago that the banks were trying to take us over. We never understood his view 20 years ago, but I now think he was onto something.

    I still shop with cash, especially since the horrendous fires in the summer when you couldn't shop with EFTPOS as there was no electricity.
    BillF2
    2nd Apr 2020
    6:14pm
    Hasn't anybody heard of money laundering?
    Frank of Brizzie
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:29pm
    NO cash means NO freedom. Already Banks have total control overwhat they consider "their" money. I mean yours. Do you remember Cyprus? Standing in a queu at the ATM a mile long to only be able to withdraw $50. So your details of how you shop and what you buy and where and how much you spend all visible to Big Brother who will like the programmed poker machines will use it to their advantage. If I'm down to my last real $$ I know instantly and see it coming. Plastic is usually lagging behind and makes us aware when the statements come with the exorbitant Interest fees. How I'm going to sell my car privately not having a card terminal? Remember CASH IS KING and No cash just a slave!!
    David
    3rd Apr 2020
    8:44pm
    I hope so.
    Billions of dollars are being evaded by tax cheats and welfare cheats.
    Banning cash would make it harder for these illegal activities and it would make it difficult for criminals in other activities such as dealing in drugs and stolen goods.
    Honest taxpayers would not have to pay as much tax if everybody paid their fair share.
    Triss
    4th Apr 2020
    3:07pm
    And you think removing cash will resolve that! There’s a loophole for everything.
    Briar
    4th Apr 2020
    5:36pm
    Does it not worry you that the government will control your money and know exactly what you spend and where? Just another control of what the UN are pushing for. No thanks from many of us.
    Triss
    4th Apr 2020
    3:01pm
    One thing has raised its head against a cashless society as folk over 60/70 have been frightened into staying at home. When groceries and medicines are needed and either neighbours or various organisations offer to shop for them how would they be able to pay the helpers? Without cash it it would mean handing over their card and PIN number which the bank expressly forbids you to do.
    Briar
    4th Apr 2020
    5:25pm
    True in some ways, but friends and family who have shopped for me have paid for my shopping and I have reimbursed them in cash. In every instance each of them has said "Thanks I don't need to find an ATM now".

    One reason they say to use EFTPOS/Tap and Go, is because the notes and coins hold germs. Well I am not sure if people realise, but our money, both notes and coins, are actually washable!
    Mez
    5th Apr 2020
    2:55pm
    Still need cash occasionally although I may have $20.00 cash for a long time.
    My daughter lives in a large block of flats where gold coins are the only way to use the communal washing machine and clothes drier so yes, cash is best still.
    Mez
    5th Apr 2020
    2:57pm
    Also necessary to help our poor homeless people!
    Beemee
    6th Apr 2020
    9:55am
    If the BS surrounding cash were 100% true then this should also happen.
    1. No personal or private letters.
    2. No personal or private packages.
    3. No food products packed in paper.
    4. No bank statements posted.
    5. No Credit card statements posted.
    7. No Manuals for things purchased that are supplied in the package of the product.
    8. No Toilet paper to be available and used.
    9. ALL paper products to be banned.

    Reminder _ Covid-19 is passed through sneezing, coughing and touching another person.
    _ Hard surfaces hold the virus longer (steel and other metal).
    _ Pets DO NOT have/get the same Covid-19 as us, their system disposes of it.
    _ There is NO crossovers of Covid-19 between people and their pets.
    Beemee
    6th Apr 2020
    9:59am
    If ANY business refused my cash, they would be in for a real shock. I would walk around in the store until I found all those register receipts, all those printed sheets of products in the store, cardboard packaging that comes with electrical items. etc and I would tell to get rid of them, you are giving me and other people Covid-19. So I will shut you down by reporting you.
    Works both F***kin ways.
    almost a grey hair
    6th Apr 2020
    2:58pm
    Just what the hell am I going to do with the 50 grand I've got under the mattress I've been hoarding to get under the line for the full pension eh
    Beemee
    6th Apr 2020
    5:33pm
    Me too, what am I going to do with 100 grand under mine? Oh hang on, I have a water bed so it doesn't apply. LOL.

    Honestly though "almost a grey hair", I know of many seniors who have up to $2.000 stashed somewhere to pay rent, mortgage, rates, electricity, whatever is due. They save darn hard and none of my friends who are all over 70, don't use a card, an ATM, etc. Include computers too, I am the odd one out.
    almost a grey hair
    7th Apr 2020
    2:37pm
    mind you, a universal pension would do away with a safe in every oldies home eh!


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