Women twice as likely to develop dementia: study

Women are more likely to develop dementia, Parkinson’s disease or have a stroke.

Women twice as likely to develop dementia: study

Women are almost twice as likely as men to develop dementia, with new research showing that the burden of illness is also far greater for women than men.

Researchers from the University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Netherlands, studied more than 12,000 people and found that one in two women will develop dementia, or Parkinson’s disease, and that half of all women will have a stroke in their lifetime.

About one third of men aged 45 and over are likely to be diagnosed with one of these conditions.

The study, published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, monitored the health of 12,102 people between 1900 and 2016 who were initially under 45 when the study commenced. During the study, 1489 participants were diagnosed with dementia, 263 with some form of Parkinson’s and 1285 had a stroke.

The risk of developing one of the three conditions was 48 per cent for women and 36 per cent for men.

Women at 45 years old had a 25.9 per cent risk of eventually developing dementia, compared with 13.7 per cent for men.

“This large study underscores the enormous impact that neurological illnesses have across society and how women are disproportionately affected, particularly when it comes to dementia,” said director of research at Alzheimer's Research UK Dr Carol Routledge.

Those with the highest risk of developing any of the three conditions typically had higher blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, high cholesterol or Type 2 diabetes when the study commenced.

“These findings strengthen the call for prioritising the focus on preventative interventions at population level which could substantially reduce the burden of common neurological diseases in the ageing population,” said the study authors.

The researchers believe that preventative measures, such as finding a drug to delay the onset of symptoms, could “substantially” reduce the burden of the illnesses.

They say that if dementia, Parkinson’s and stroke could be delayed by one to three years, the risk of developing either of these conditions could be reduced by 20 per cent among 45-year-olds and more than half in those aged 85 and older.

Were you aware that women were more likely than men to develop dementia?

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    COMMENTS

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    Rosret
    8th Oct 2018
    10:40am
    YLC - you are getting far too many sponsors! - Its annoying scrolling past them and avoiding the accidental click.
    PS I haven't forgotten they were there yesterday as well. hehe.
    I would love to see the stats on this. Women live longer than men. Women are often the carer until they aren't anymore and then its officially documented somewhere.

    It may be true, however I would suggest a lot of women cover the load of the man with dementia and he dies of some other unrelated cause while still in homecare.
    Retirement homes are disportionately full of women.
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    12:28pm
    Men are gearing up to force government to address and rectify (on demand) the age gap....
    Knight Templar
    8th Oct 2018
    11:45am
    The study monitored the health of the 12,102 people between 1990 and 2016 NOT 1900 and 2016.
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    12:29pm
    Pretty long age whichever it is...... when you live for eternity what's the difference of a mere century or so?
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    12:27pm
    Starts earlier, too - around about 20 or 21 ........ at the stage where they are ardent feminists.. sometimes even younger under the wrong conditions....
    Knight Templar
    8th Oct 2018
    1:17pm
    The article states "women are disproportionately affected when it comes to dementia". That is not in dispute.

    However, I have yet to see research study groups and medical charitable organisations admitting that MEN are disproportionately affected when it comes to strokes, heart disease, cancer and early deaths.
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    1:41pm
    Ah.... yes.... I forgot that salient point....
    Kaz
    8th Oct 2018
    3:27pm
    Trebor? This comment is inane - does that lead to dementia?
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    4:41pm
    in-ane ...hmmm... just joshing yez along on Monday morning..... pretty true though...

    Ane is French for Ass - I'm just covering my ass....
    KB
    8th Oct 2018
    1:35pm
    Sadly younger people such as children have been diagnosed with some form of dementia. Rosret is right .My mother took care of her husband when he had dementia and outlived him by a couple of years. Dementia and the like can be inherited.

    8th Oct 2018
    2:07pm
    they should do a study on the relationship between feminism and dementia
    Kaz
    8th Oct 2018
    3:28pm
    We seem to have a lot of crazy comments today.
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    4:42pm
    diablo is correct there.... the Delphic Oracles of Feminism need a full psychiatric workup...
    Kaz
    8th Oct 2018
    3:31pm
    It doesn’t give much other evidence to link it. Why? Is it related to longevity, not sleeping well because of caring for children, paid work and caring for family, etc
    Anonymous
    8th Oct 2018
    4:29pm
    Not sleeping well caring for children , wirk and family?
    What planet are you living on.

    The survey is rubbish. If the stats are right, then only reason could be is women live longer and perhaps start of with less cognitive skills anyway
    Thoughtful
    8th Oct 2018
    6:43pm
    Olbaid - do you mean "perhaps start OFF with less cognitive skills anyway " ?
    TREBOR
    8th Oct 2018
    11:42pm
    The ex has weighed in - she says :- "It's because you drive us crazy!"

    That's the solution right there - nobody can argue with that......
    Thoughtful
    9th Oct 2018
    2:17pm
    Gold.

    14th Oct 2018
    2:56pm
    So more women get dementia. Maybe that's because men die earlier than women.


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