Researchers find that dizzy spells may lead to dementia

Your dizzy spells may lead to dementia or cognitive decline.

dizzy man

A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reveals that your dizzy spells, although worrying at the time, may actually lead to dementia.

As you age, you may have noticed becoming dizzy when you stand. This is due to a temporary drop in blood pressure – known as orthostatic hypotension – and this reduced blood flow could cause damage to your brain, leading to dementia later on.

The study analysed 11,500 adults with an average age of 54, whose health was tracked over 20 years.

Those who experienced orthostatic hypotension were 40 per cent more likely to develop dementia or a 15 per cent increased risk of cognitive decline than those who didn’t, although researchers couldn’t prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

"Even though these episodes are fleeting, they may have impacts that are long lasting," said study leader Andreea Rawlings. "It's a significant finding, and we need to better understand just what is happening."

"Identifying risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia is important for understanding disease progression, and being able to identify those most at risk gives us possible strategies for prevention and intervention," said Ms. Rawlings.

"This is one of those factors worth more investigation."

Read the study overview

Do you experience dizzy spells? If so, maybe it’s time to see a health professional.

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    COMMENTS

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    Rosret
    31st Mar 2017
    12:38pm
    Good grief - don't be ridiculous. There are so many other things it could be that are far more serious than parting with a few neurons. If you are dizzy -see a doctor.
    buby
    3rd May 2017
    12:13pm
    LOL yes your right on the money with that Rosret.
    They are funny, i'm sure they love to get the oldies a bit concerned.
    IT could even be from lack of decent vitamins!!
    I'm not sure if seeing a doctor will help them lol.
    Puglet
    31st Mar 2017
    1:21pm
    At the doctor's the other day I was asked if I recently had a fall and I said yes. I could see the lights turn on and the nurse thinking - 'another one with Alzheimer's" . I fell because I tripped over the dog's lead although I may also be showing early signs. Every day or so we are told of 'causes' of Alzheimer's disease which can be overwhelming and very scary. Too high blood pressure as well as too low blood pressure may be related factors as is almost every activity of life. Even if we are as physically and mentally healthy and as busy as we can we still may get it because of our genetics. It's very easy to become the 'worried well' because we keep looking for the next symptom.
    biddi
    31st Mar 2017
    2:20pm
    And it could be your ear/s. I find this heading frightening, initially, and
    unnecessary.
    buby
    3rd May 2017
    12:14pm
    Perhaps even POLLUTION is causing ppl to have dizziness, HOw do we know! they make such stupid assumptions?
    Funny face
    31st Mar 2017
    8:56pm
    I agree. Worrying people for nothing. I always tripped over the dog, but so dud my sister and my neighbour! It was the way he just syopped in front if you suddenly ( o.k he was blind and deaf!). But we do have " benign vertigo". Why worry people if you don't need too. Gives some people something more to worry about! Silly and unnecessary.
    Funny face
    31st Mar 2017
    8:56pm
    I agree. Worrying people for nothing. I always tripped over the dog, but so dud my sister and my neighbour! It was the way he just syopped in front if you suddenly ( o.k he was blind and deaf!). But we do have " benign vertigo". Why worry people if you don't need too. Gives some people something more to worry about! Silly and unnecessary.
    Mary
    1st Apr 2017
    12:42pm
    I agree, Rosret. This is ridiculous. A lot of guessing is going on concerning dementia.


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