Heart disease link goes unnoticed

Many adults aren't aware of the link between high blood pressure and heart disease.

Heart disease link goes unnoticed

High blood pressure affects one in three Australian adults, yet in a recent survey, a third of respondents didn’t know there was a link between the disease and having a heart attack, heart failure and heart disease.

The survey, undertaken on behalf of NPS MedicineWise, canvassed 1136 Australian adults and found that as well as one third being unaware of the above link;

  • one in three didn’t realise there was a link between high blood pressure and having a stroke – in the 35-49 age group, this increased to half being unaware
  • 96 per cent of those surveyed didn’t think there was a link between high blood pressure and kidney disease.

While 79 per cent of those surveyed had received lifestyle advice, many find it difficult to implement changes that could reduce high blood pressure:

  • one in three were not exercising more
  • one in five did not lower their salt intake
  • two-thirds advised to lose weight, didn’t
  • 50 per cent advised to quit smoking, didn’t

A systematic approach to monitoring and managing high blood pressure is required to reduce the associated risks. The latest program from NPS MedicineWise recommends:

  • regularly checking your blood pressure, following advice from a health professional on how often it should be done
  • recording your results and keeping a diary of medicine taken
  • knowing your safe blood pressure range
  • making the necessary recommended lifestyle changes
  • taking your medicines as prescribed.

Find more detailed information about managing high blood pressure at NPS.org.au 





    COMMENTS

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    HarrysOpinion
    11th Mar 2015
    12:55pm
    So how come 24 hour blood pressure monitors are not covered by Medicare? Why do pensioners who need 24 -HBPMs have to fork out $85 to Hanley Moir? and how come that the Heart Foundation and Hypertension Society does not offer then to needy people for free, as charity? I've tried, got referred to a professor specialising with blood pressure in Tasmania who simple confirmed that's its not covered by Medicare and got zilch, "sorry we can't help you" Next time the Heart Foundation or any other charity reaches out for donations from me I know what I will tell them!!!
    ming chew
    11th Mar 2015
    1:20pm
    Totally agree!!!
    KSS
    11th Mar 2015
    1:58pm
    It is treated like many other diagnostic tests where the test is not covered or is only partially covered by medicare such as MRIs at close to $300 an expanded thyroid test at over $200. Put in that framework, $85 doesn't look so bad for a test that takes 24 hours.
    MITZY
    11th Mar 2015
    4:26pm
    HS: I'm unsure about "24 hour blood pressure monitors" but Kaye's article is really about having regular blood pressure check-ups on the advice of your doctor.
    Quite a lot of chemist shops do blood pressure checks free of charge. They provide you with a card to record your details and you can easily keep a record of this to show your doctor when you visit him/her. This is an excellent service and chemists of the future will most probably be doing more and varied tests.
    I pop into the chemist in my local area about once a fortnight to have my blood pressure checked, I don't have a problem with it, but its better to check up and nip anything in the bud if it does start to rise. As we all know, its a silent killer. You can't actually feel that you have blood pressure until you have had it checked.
    Cheers.
    HarrysOpinion
    11th Mar 2015
    2:23pm
    Well, KSS it's easy for you to say that perhaps you are wealthier than me. I still haven't had the 24-HBPM because I simply can't afford it and God forbid if I was told by my GP to get an MIR or thyroid test... There was a long stage in my past when my Medicare contribution was over $1,200 per year...so when I need Medicare.... I get zilch!!!! SHAME ON YOU AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT...SHAME ON YOU!!!!!


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