5th Aug 2017

Are you cleaning your teeth the right way?

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cleaning teeth
Leon Della Bosca

Did you know that, each year, around 60,000 Australians end up in hospital because of dodgy teeth? Globally, preventable dental conditions cost around $420 billion each year.


So, it goes without saying that cleaning your teeth is of the utmost importance.

In fact, it could save your life.

Related articles:
Natural teeth-whitening techniques
Ways you may be ruining your teeth
More ways you may be ruining your teeth


“The technique often recommended for both children and adults is the ‘modified Bass’,” Melbourne Dental School’s Professor David Manton told The New Daily.

“This involves holding the brush at 45 degrees to the side of the tooth and rolling away from the gum line. The eating surfaces of the teeth can be cleaned in a scrubbing motion – but this should be avoided on the sides of teeth,” said the academic, who is the Elsdon Storey Chair of Child Dental Health at the school.



“If the sides of the teeth are brushed with strong pressure (scrubbing), then gum recession can occur, and some individuals are more prone to this.

“This problem is moderated in some powered brushes that have a pressure sensor that stops the movement of the brush if too much pressure is used. Most hand brushes now are soft with a flexible neck, which decreases the pressure a little.”

Prof Manton also recommends an electric toothbrush, although he says that they’re not a quick fix-all – they still need to be used for two minutes and in conjunction with dental floss.

As far as how much toothpaste to use, he said adults need a little bit more than a pea-sized amount. Any more than that and you’re “just wasting paste”.

He says that fluoridated toothpaste is an essential part of brushing and that we shouldn’t rinse after brushing, because the little bit of fluoride left in our mouths can keep working after we’ve popped the brush back in the cabinet.

It’s advised that you should brush twice a day for at least two minutes at a time. One of those sessions would ideally include brushing, flossing and rinsing with a fluoridated mouthwash.

Are you cleaning your teeth the right way?

 

 





COMMENTS

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Rosret
8th Aug 2017
10:17am
There is a non sequitur there. People are ending up in hospital due to the cost of dental care not just from poor home dental health.
You need a good tidy reserve for dental treatment these days and there is no way someone on a low income or a pension could afford dentist charges.
Its not about teeth cleaning that rots the teeth anyway - its about what has gone passed those beautiful enamels for the last eon. Nothing like Coke to eat away at those pearls.
Rosret
8th Aug 2017
10:21am
Also - those whitening toothpastes - ugh - not for oldies. And Colgate sensitive will make teeth just that - very sensitive!
Has anyone ever wonder how much damage the whitening toothpastes must be doing to the teeth?
tisme
8th Aug 2017
10:29am
I can see the logic in not rinsing but oh the taste
Charlie
8th Aug 2017
10:57am
Pensioners dental care should have progressed to where we an get root canal, post and cap, but in most cases they wont do it. Its usually an extraction and some partial plate with false teeth.

I think an electric tooth brush is worth having. It can put a lot of brushing in places that are hard to reach and are usually done poorly. Avoiding the extraction of a back molar is worth the extra trouble. Also brushing a second time during the day slows down a lot of decay.

Flossing gets rid of a lot of food the toothbrush leaves behind. It also provides smiles that don't reveal the remains of the lunch menu. In recent years dentists have become more skilled at getting the gaps exactly right. They also seem to avoid joining two teeth together unless one really needs support. Teeth that are joined at the top probably need some regular tooth pick treatment to aid cleaning.

I have always been divided on whether to put the paste on the tooth brush or in the mouth. Too much toothpaste causes so much froth that its hard to tell if the brush has touched the tooth or not. These days I put the toothpaste in my mouth, swirl with water and spit out once. I then brush with a softer than soft brush, called sensitive.

I have heard it said that bacteria build up on the tooth brush so I give mine a flush with hot water (that's when I remember) I also replace the brush (when I remember)
ROB
8th Aug 2017
11:47am
We use filtered tank water and toothpaste WITHOUT fluoride. Looking at the number of countries banning the use of fluoride in water and so many considering it does not help with tooth decay but provides the risk of introducing toxins into our body's I am so glad we avoid fluoride. Of course there are always arguments for and against and we are just going along without the risks - be they real or not.
MICK
8th Aug 2017
11:53am
You are correct. The so called 'expert' is another jerk who has no idea.
If you want protection then gargle with a strong salt solution. Guaranteed to kill decay.
Charlie
8th Aug 2017
1:04pm
I know of places in New South Wales where the ground water that people use for drinking has about 1/3 of the dose of fluoride used in regular fluoridated water supplies and this occurs naturally.

Whether the oral health of people can benefit from the addition of fluoride depends on their diet and in some cases their family background.

Given the modern sugary diet that's also resulting in obesity. Experts agree that the oral health for the majority of people, can benefit through the addition of fluoride to the water supply.
MICK
8th Aug 2017
11:52am
Not rinse the fluoride and then swallow it? The next 'expert' who is going to make you sick.
ROB
8th Aug 2017
6:27pm
There is a particular ratio for percentage of fluoride to body weight that if exceeded will kill you. The lethal dose for human is 5 to 10 g (which is 32 to 64 mg/kg elemental fluoride/kg body weight). Fluoride is also considered responsible for the retention of heavy metals in the body and brain - something to do with memory problems perhaps?
Raphael
8th Aug 2017
12:12pm
Pensioners should be forced to have all their teeth pulled out
That way they won't need expensive care and can save on meals by having soup 24x7

If you haven't learnt to brush by the time you're a senior, forget it
MICK
8th Aug 2017
1:02pm
I'll remember that advice next time I head for the dentist.
Polly Esther
8th Aug 2017
2:09pm
ha ha ha ha :-))
Poppysmum
8th Aug 2017
2:55pm
That actually used to happen in days gone by.......a woman was given the money to have her teeth extracted and a set of false teeth by her parents, prior to her marriage. That saved the bridegroom the expensive dental treatments in later years. Dentists have ALWAYS been expensive.
Nan Norma
8th Aug 2017
4:52pm
Some dentists do rip people off. But I do know someone that got an abscess in his gum that nearly cost him his life. So we do need dentists.
Radish
8th Aug 2017
5:46pm
Dental hygiene is very important....it can affect your heart if you do not take care of your teeth. They are both connected.
Jake
8th Aug 2017
8:05pm
What seems to be never mentioned. Grains have some of the strongest acids of our common foods. They are mostly from the enzyme inhibiting hard protective coating on all grains. Best to brush immediately after any cereals and other grains. Also.. I was weaned on coke... been my fave drink since it was threepence to drink here... and fourpence to take away.. Got all my bottom teeth.. a few top ones missing.. for cosmetic enhancement. Be really refreshed.. Cheers Jake
musicveg
9th Aug 2017
12:26am
I pre-soak all my grains with some salt in the water, and rinsed several times, supposed to help. Sprouting is even better.
tisme
9th Aug 2017
12:34am
not too soon after eating , brushing to soon scrubs the acids etc into the teeth doesnt it ??
Blossom
9th Aug 2017
3:15pm
If you eat acidic food (citrus are some of the worst) you are supposed to rinse your teeth / mouth well before brushing/cleaning them.
Chris B T
9th Aug 2017
3:17pm
Most Teeth problems come from people not cleaning teeth.
At least brushing of teeth is better than not, what ever method.
Once, Twice & Three times a day of brushing teeth, for me twice.
[;-(O)


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