18th Jan 2017
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The news in brief: what’s happening around Australia?
aboriginal art on boomerangs

While breaking news items receive the most publicity, every day, in every corner of the country, a different kind of news is trending. Today, we share three lesser-known news items that reflect what else is happening in Australia.

1. An American burger joint comes to Sydney and everybody goes nuts
Okay, so it’s not a burger joint so much as a temporary ‘pop-up restaurant’. The hugely popular American fast food chain In-N-Out Burger opened its doors in 1948 and gained a cult following around the world for its simple, cheap food. Here, you can get a cooked-to-order burger for just US$2 and fries for US$1. Sydneysiders were all too happy to jump on this bandwagon (which required a wristband for entrance), waiting in lines for 40 minutes to take part in the one-burger-per-person policy. Since burgers were limited, many people missed out before they’d reached the front of the queue.

Read more at news.com.au

2. Controversial Australia Day billboard will be reinstated
A controversial Melbourne billboard featuring two Muslim girls wearing hijabs was removed by Victoria’s multicultural affairs minister Robin Scott yesterday, following threats made to the company behind it. The digital billiard, placed along a freeway, sparked hundreds of complaints from people who said that it did not reflect Australia Day or Australian’s values. However, in a story of social justice, the billboard will be reinstated, after a GoFundMe crowd-funding campaign to save it raised $11,500. Following the massive public response, the $20,000 target was raised to $50,000. As well as re-erecting the billboard across the country, the advertisers behind the campaign now wish to feature the ad in newspapers and street posters around Australia.

Read more at news.com.au

3. Calls to make fake Aboriginal-style souvenirs illegal in Australia
Australia’s Indigenous arts community is calling on the Government to crack down on fake Aboriginal-style souvenirs, ahead of next year’s Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast. The Indigenous arts community wants the Federal Government to change the Competition and Consumer Laws to make it illegal to import and sell imitation art pieces. Campaigners say they have found “an insurmountable tidal wave of fake products” in 80 per cent of the tourist shops, galleries and markets that they’ve visited. Fake versions of traditional items, such as boomerangs, digeridoos and other art, are produced outside Australia using non-native materials, such as bamboo. Other items, including thongs, tea towels and mugs with dot paintings are almost all mass produced overseas in India, Indonesia and China.

Read more at abc.net.au

What other lesser-known news items are worthy of note?

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    COMMENTS

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    Troubadour
    19th Jan 2017
    1:18pm
    Totally agree that Aboriginal souvenirs, should be just that genuine ABORIGINAL - mass production from other countries horrifies me. We have some beautiful Aboriginal Art all
    around Australia so lets honour it correctly. We had visitors from the UK and my friend so
    wanted to take back a Didgeridoo for her son - BUT we all agreed it MUST be original.
    Took us a while and cost a little bit more, but worth it.
    KSS
    19th Jan 2017
    1:37pm
    Agree but I'd like it extended to ALL Australian souvenirs such as the stuffed koala and kangaroo toys, key rings, emu skin purses, Uluru next to the opera house in a glass dome etc that you find in all the tat shops, not just specific Aboriginal cultural objects such as the didgeridoo and boomerangs.
    Troubadour
    19th Jan 2017
    2:40pm
    Yes KSS I meant all that stuff too - all the cheap and tacky stuff.
    Mrs Hedgehog
    20th Jan 2017
    3:04pm
    These fake sounenirs have been around for ages, the supply of the genuine article is too limited and too expensive to supply the tourist trade. If you ban them what are you going to sell the tourists? If the Aboriginal people want a monopoly they need to be able to produce large quantities of items at competitive prices.
    Watto
    20th Jan 2017
    6:58pm
    I see my post was removed Is Theodorakis a protected species ?? Good to see Democracy at work in Australia


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