4th Nov 2015
Michelle’s win for women
Michelle’s win for women

When New Zealand-bred Prince of Penzance crossed the finish line at Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, history was made. Jockey Michelle Payne became the first woman to win the Melbourne Cup in the race’s 155-year history.

Payne was elated at riding the 100-1 outsider to victory in “such a chauvinistic sport”. She described the big win as a “dream come true”, telling the media that as a child she had been teased by her friends for wanting to win the Melbourne Cup. “I can't believe we've done it,” she said.

Her brother Stevie was her strapper and enjoyed a celebration hug straight after Michelle’s win. The 10 Payne children were raised by their horse trainer dad, Paddy after the death of his wife, in a car accident when Michelle was just six months old. 

The Ballarat-born jockey called-out the sexist environment of horse racing, and said that, “I know of some owners who wanted to kick me off”.

But to those who doubted her, Payne had this to say: “I want to say to everyone else, get stuffed, because they think women aren’t strong enough, but we just beat the world.”

“I’m so pleased to win and hopefully it will mean people give more female jockeys a go,” she said.

The winning pair had good fortune in their corner, being allocated the advantage of the inside stall.

However, not all horses escaped the race victorious. Each year, the use and treatment of horses for entertainment for the Melbourne Cup is called into question.

This year, after taking a fall and breaking his leg, 10-yerd-old Red Cadeaux was taken to Werribee for treatment. The triple runner-up and sentimental favourite’s chances of survival at first appeared grim. He has had surgery and is expected to recover well and enjoyed a well-deserved retirement.

According to the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses (CPR), 127 horses have died on Australian racetracks, and thousands more have ‘disappeared’ from the sport in the past 12 months.

That’s more than five times the number of horses running in the Melbourne Cup, activists say. However, statistics from Australian Racing show that on-track deaths account for less than one per cent, and deaths are down 133.

CPR claims that each year there are thousands of horses that suffer injuries and are subsequently killed off track and out of the public eye. 

"Many horses will sustain injuries and then simply disappear ... for most of these horses, our research has shown, that they end up being slaughtered," CPR campaign director Elio Celotto said.

"Between 12,000 to 15,000 racehorses exit the racing industry every year ... most of them will be sent straight to the slaughterhouse," he added.

Last year, the shocking death of Japanese Thoroughbred Admire Rakti, just minutes after the Melbourne Cup race, stunned spectators around the world and cast a long shadow over Flemington. An inquest into the death eventually labelled a heart attack as the cause.

Read more at The Guardian

Read more at The Herald Sun

Opinion: Change in the air

Seeing a woman win the Melbourne Cup is a victory, not just in horseracing, but for society in general. It’s a victory because it’s yet another example where a woman has entered a traditionally male-dominated field. And we aren’t just seeing women compete – we’re seeing them win.

What this serves to do is smash the old views that both women and men should be confined to ‘their places’ in the world. When women claim space in arenas where they haven’t previously been welcomed, they are saying, “We have a right to be here too.”

So, even though I’m not generally interested in the Melbourne Cup, and abhor the exploitation of animals for any kind of human amusement, I appreciate that this victory represents something bigger than just winning a horse race. It represents an important change. It represents new hope for a lot of women who have been told to keep to their restrictive traditionally female roles. 

I hope that Payne’s win encourages more women to enter the race. And considering that the target audience for the Melbourne Cup is both men and women, shouldn’t the female punters enjoy equal representation?

Did you watch the Melbourne Cup? Did you cheer and clap when Michelle crossed the finish line? How do you feel about the event as a whole?

The great image that we have used is taken from this clip of Michelle Payne's post-race interview.





    COMMENTS

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    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    10:13am
    Like many other people I cheered a woman winning the Cup.
    What I never cheer is the blatant sexism creeping into journalism whereby feminist reporters blatantly push their gender and exclude men. Every other day we hear about 'womens' groups, organisations, needs and illnesses. Rather sickening really. If men tried that one on they would be attacked for being sexist.
    Come on girls, you can't have it both ways.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    11:49am
    That's fine Mick. But remember anyone would have that reaction to the blatant inequality that is the norm for women.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:10pm
    I never hear anybody speak up for this sort of gender bias. Only if a man says something.

    Do you remember the guy who slagged off at the female driver team just before Bathurst. One of the ladies had never driven a V8 and neither had never raced at Bathurst. It was no surprise that this team smashed their car into the wall early on. Whilst we all heard the attacks on the guy who slagged off at the ladies who ever said anything about letting this accident waiting to happen compete? Zilch!
    Sorry ladies. There may be unfairnesses where women are concerned but it has gotten to joke status and men need to get off the lounge, stop being politically correct and stick their necks up..........even if they are going to be targeted.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    12:20pm
    Mick, I don't believe that the woman has never driven a V8. Would it be more correct that she has never driven one in a race.

    I guess we don't see men youngsters being slagged off if they crash in a V8 driving them for the first time in a race.
    TREBOR
    4th Nov 2015
    12:31pm
    I was pleased for her as well and for her family... but Mick is right about the bias in journalism and in some other areas of life. It is absurd that there is such an obvious and heavily weighted leaning towards women these days, as some sort of 'compensation package'.

    Let's just have everyone stand on their own two feet and be treated equally.

    Are men truly welcome in such woman-dominated areas as nursing etc? I doubt it.
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    12:48pm
    Mick you need to pick your fights better. Most of the time I support the gist of your complaints on the gender issue particularly with regard to health issues BUT it is undeniable that still today after 50 years of fighting, there are still areas where women are disadvantaged for no other reason then they are women. You bring up Bathurst, tell me again how many men crashed their cars early on in this year's race? No one said they should not have been there. How many of the male teams cars were given an offensive nickname? Precisely NONE. That is the point. It was MEN who made the events of Bathurst a gender issue not the women involved.

    As far as the Melbourne Cup win is concerned, it was a fantastic achievement for Ms Payne as it would have been for any male jockey to win on an outsider. The point here is really that some of the owners of the horse did not want Ms Payne to ride for no other reason than she is a woman. And that despite her having ridden the horse successfully to get that far. Well I bet they're glad she did now eh? So yes Stuff the lot of them! No male jockey would have had to fight for his ride they way she had to simply because she is a woman.
    Sundays
    4th Nov 2015
    1:00pm
    Well said KSS.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:02pm
    I do not think there is gender bias in the nursing profession I think it's more "That's women's work" much the same as as doctors were supposed to be men in the past.

    I was interesting to note in some graphs I looked at that the number of women doctors under 30 is greater than the number of male doctors. Rapidly decreasing in the higher age bands. The ladies are catching up chaps.

    It also showed that the number of male nurses was about 10% in 2012 but once again even if this is so it still showed that the male nurse average salaries where higher the female nurses salaries. So the the gender bias carries on even in the female dominated areas.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:03pm
    I should have started that with "I do not think there is gender bias in the nursing profession against men"
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:07pm
    Well there is bias in the education system and framework. What are we doing about that.
    Hasbeen
    4th Nov 2015
    1:23pm
    I can't see what the fuss is about. Women have been riding showjumpers & 3 day eventers at the highest level for decades. Quite a few have won gold medals for us at the Olympics, & that takes more skill ability & empathy with the horse than a short gallop round a race track.

    Women in general, have always been good with animals. In fact it was probably women, sympathetically feeding young wild animals that domesticated most of our useful animals, so why all the fuss just because one just happened to be on the right one on the right day in Melbourne. Me thinks it is their inferiority complex rising it's ugly head again.

    As for the damn fool business of stuffing incompetent women in cars at Bathurst, that has been happening for decades too. Back in the 60s, when the race was for stock road cars, & a lot slower, we always had a girls team, always of photogenic girls, driving a car, often sponsored by some woman's magazine.

    Always in a lower powered car, they would form a mobile chicane, getting in everyone's way, until they inevitably crashed.

    I have a daughter who was a brilliant horse rider. I have sailed with a couple of great lady sailors, & known a few who could drive pretty well. Some of them might have made it to the top, if their maternal instinct had not got in the way.

    For god sake girls, settle for what you have got, it's all the same in the long run. When I look back at some of my wins at Bathurst so long ago, I find it hard to believe I actually did it, or what it felt like.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:36pm
    KSS: whilst you have a valid point my perspective on this one is that one of the ladies had come out of formula cars. Scary stuff, but hardly a preparation for Bathurst. Not sure about the other one.
    The point I was trying to make, perhaps badly, is that the guy who had a go at the ladies before the race was crucified and the ladies then proved that he may have had a right to criticise, albeit it in a better manner. He would have been eating his hat if they had finished and done well and maybe that's where the stewards should have left the matter. Not with a heavy fine.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    9:18am
    KSS. I think Ms.Payne is an utter delight. She seems to glow with the family values instilled in her ... and what a family!! I think she was right to mouth-off at the male dominated racing fraternity, good on her! She showed the b!@#$$%^^s !! Like the old song says "Anything you can do I can do better.." and she did.

    She is a delightful young miss, and I am so proud to be a woman. She achieved her dreams against all adversaries. As a human being she dared to dream and reached for the stars. As a young woman she has proved anything is possible.

    This young lady has my utmost respect and admiration. She is a credit to her upbringing, but then again, she has a remarkable father.

    What a legend!!!!!!
    LodgerE
    4th Nov 2015
    10:47am
    Regardless of "mick"'s opinion on women reporters, I believe Ms Michelle Payne's victorious ride yesterday, and straight-forward speech following, was a marvelous step for all women, jockeys or not. A straight-shooting, strong young lady, who has stepped up to the plate as an example for all to follow. Well done, Ms Michelle. May you continue your riding career with full support of trainers and owners with you all the way.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:11pm
    I think I agreed with that.
    particolor
    4th Nov 2015
    8:24pm
    So do I !! And it would have been an even bigger event if She had Carried the Horse over the Line !! :-) :-)
    JAID
    5th Nov 2015
    9:24am
    Agreed particolor.

    I am happy for her as an individual achieving what she wanted to achieve but (and admittedly as someone highly ignorant of the industry) I cannot see what the big fuss is about. Women have been winning horse races for decades since they started riding in them haven't they? Sounds like a social cringe from that perspective.

    Again, from an extreme outsider's point of view isn't any male domination of the track something fairly consistent with the numbers who happen to be interested in trotting along it? That the proportion of interested parties have been changing is obvious even to someone who avoids the back sections of the papers. The proportion of those who bother with It at all to those who don't would be more interesting. Is it going the way of the dogs?
    Queensland Diva
    4th Nov 2015
    10:47am
    I get what you're saying Mick and I agree with you sometimes, but after so many years of male domination in most parts of the world I also understand the other side. There is still a large imbalance for many people in the workplace and while I firmly believe men get a raw deal in things like child custody, women obviously feel that any win, however small needs celebration.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:12pm
    Inequities everywhere Diva but the pendulum is swinging too far when you have laws around sexism and you only apply them to men.
    Kaye Fallick
    4th Nov 2015
    10:54am
    With women having about half the savings in super that men do, and their representation on the nation's boards below 15% there is an AWFUL lot of catching up to do - i think yesterdays' win was a victory for her dad, Paddy, who raised 10 kids after the untimely loss of his wife, for her brother Billy, the strapper who couldn't stop smiling, and for each and every woman jockey in the country who is striving to get a gig!
    Old Silver Fox
    4th Nov 2015
    11:28am
    Kaye it wasn't a win for every female jockey in the country who is striving to get a gig. It was a magnificent win for Michelle Payne. It was however, a magnificent goal for these jockeys to aspire to.
    Espera
    4th Nov 2015
    12:08pm
    Sorry to correct you, but I am sure the strapper's name is Stevie
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:19pm
    Good to have you weigh in Kaye.
    Whilst you are correct there are always two sides to a coin. In regard to women's superannuation you are correct, but then women are entitled to a share of their partner's superannuation should they split. Also, there is unfairness in the workplace. Whilst I recognise the glass ceiling (this works both ways though!) you have to remember that women who leave the workforce to rear a family do not get superannuation. Don't know what you think should happen here and I guess the same applies to stay at home dads these days. This is the case for my daughter.
    Probably not the place to bring it up but do you remember how men used to be treated when they split with their wives? Not pretty. It destroyed many a man!
    Ok, I agree....let's savour the moment in regard to the Melbourne Cup. Michelle appeared to be a really nice PERSON and that is what was so refreshing. Not the fact she was a woman. And she spoke really well...and from the heart. Got my tick of approval!
    Cheers.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:34pm
    Kaye are you a symbol?
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    9:31am
    Kaye, I hadn't realised that the win was also a victory for Down Syndrome people. I really do hold the whole family in high regard. They are one classy family. Ms. Payne dared to dream and won!! As I said in another post, she's a legend!
    Campbell
    4th Nov 2015
    11:06am
    This is a great thing for all of the ladies of Australia.
    I have always treated women with honor and respect unlike some of the ratbags I know of in my town.
    I would have loved to be on the horse that came second just to watch that pretty little bottom bouncing along on a horses back.
    Sorry but I'm a red blooded male.
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    11:16am
    She's a wonderful, humble young woman. Good on her. (BTW, she didn't win The Cup - she rode the winner).
    Kaye Fallick
    4th Nov 2015
    11:28am
    Good point Rod - the horse won the cup!!!!!
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:20pm
    Good perspective.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    9:38am
    don't take away from her glory. There were many people involved in the win ... horse included. She was the winning jockey in the Melbourne Cup. The winning horse was ridden by a winning jockey. Ms. Payne won the race and the hearts of a nation.
    lauren
    4th Nov 2015
    11:29am
    A great win Michelle, God bless you and your gorgeous brother Billy.
    MITZY
    4th Nov 2015
    1:03pm
    I agree Lauren, however her brother's name is Stevie. Winning the Melbourne Cup race is hard enough, but even getting into the final 24 is a major achievement. Then on her second ride in this great event (her first ride was for Bart Cummings) she actually steers the winning horse and ends up in front after a little more than three minutes work. How elated she must have felt to beat 23 other jockeys and some of them said to be the "best in the world". And, that final three minutes. took a stable of people and a trainer twelve months hard work to get there. It took many owners of the horse agonising about its welfare and some of them having the faith to stick with Michelle Payne who has ridden it in practically every race of its career. One of the part owners got the draw to choose the racing colours it would wear and another got to chose the jockey along with the trainer.
    Michelle Payne is a credit to the racing industry, a credit to her family and more importantly a credit to herself. She is a young woman who is erudite, has a lot of time for the less fortunate and while she was recovering from one of many injuries sustained in a dangerous occupation she spent that time overseas caring for disadvantaged children in Africa. I can recall many years ago watching the whole family being interviewed by Mike Monroe on his programme "This Is Your Life". What a great achievement. And today she rides in another Cup race at Kyneton for the same trainer. Its back to business.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    11:33am
    I don't think Michelle Payne was given enough credit for the way she held her position on the rail and then made a judgement to pull the horse 4 or 5 wide just in time to avoid a skirmish which slowed down the 2nd placegetter among others. Had she not been so decisive, particularly at that timely part of the race, victory would have been lost.
    It was a brilliant ride!
    Just goes to prove, give the job to someone who needs it the most. It's as much a triumph for the human spirit as it is for women.
    lauren
    4th Nov 2015
    11:43am
    I agree Frank, a well thought out brilliant ride.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    11:53am
    That's right it's a team of the horse and jockey. Neither of them would have won all by themselves.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    7:59pm
    Damn it was a good ride!!
    I have to write it again!!
    Michelle Payne was ready and so to was the Prince of Penzance!!
    The trainer asked Michelle before the race.
    "You know if you win this your life will change forever. Are you ready for that?"
    To which she replied, "Yes I'm ready!"
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    11:47am
    Good on her and stuff all the men who think they are gods gift to the world.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:21pm
    There certainly are a few of them. And a few women too.
    Billyboy
    4th Nov 2015
    12:06pm
    WELL SAID MICK. My dictionary defines chauvinism as 'absurdly exaggerated patriotism'.
    And that exactly fits with the incessant ravings of Female Chauvanist journalists and other such commentators.
    Nobody should be in any position on a gender basis purely to balance the numbers.
    They should be there on ability. That goes for jockeys as much as politicians and every other role except those that are gender specific such as motherhood.
    Michelle rode the winner due to her ability and deserves all the praise she has received without dragging gender into it.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:23pm
    The behaviour of the increasingly female owned Press is not only disturbing but ILLEGAL. Like most of the laws in our nation however compliance is mandatory until somebody in a position of power says 'enough'.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    12:26pm
    I guess it's the same as say two lawyers qualifying at the same level go to a firm for a job both get one but the guy is offered more pay.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    12:48pm
    Wstaton. What if the woman is given more pay, or just given the job to square up the numbers.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:13pm
    I am not saying that the woman lawyer should have been the one who got more pay. Both being newly qualified at the same level should at least get equal pay. Higher pay from then on should be solely on performance which can and should be measured.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:16pm
    Wstaton you said 'if the guy is offered more pay'. Which is the blatant sexism in line with feminist philosophy.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    3:58pm
    Come on guys. The issue is 'what is a fair thing'. If you are going to have a 'sexism' card then it should be applicable to both sexes, not just one. I would suggest that is the problem but maybe some folk might disagree.
    jamesmn
    4th Nov 2015
    12:16pm
    good on you Michelle I had money on you as I did a couple of weeks ago when you won then too and yes I come from Ballarat but what I don't agree with in racing is that the women jockeys don't have their own change rooms they have to use the women's toilets this is absolute rubbish racing wants to get its act together and give the women their own change room straight away its rubbish they have got away with this for so long.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    12:24pm
    Don't think Michelle was running james.
    Good point about the change rooms. Must be tough to work with this.
    MITZY
    4th Nov 2015
    1:19pm
    Yesterday there wasn't enough room in the jockeys' room at Flemington and four of the overseas jockeys shared Michelle's room (she invited them).
    The major race courses do have change rooms for women jockeys, but its when you go to the country and provincial races there is an absence of them. However, most country races only have a dozen meetings a year and their income is not great and of course they depend a lot on the locals becoming members to support them. Buildings are often old and built probably when there were no women jockeys(?) I assume. I have a cousin with a couple of horses as a hobby and we go to Moruya races for the TEN (10) meetings each year to watch the races (we don't bet). Melbourne Cup is our exception. It is a nice social event each time but half of those meetings are not TAB meetings and are held mid-week and therefore on those occasions are not patronised by many people possibly no more than a few hundred people so they raise little revenue. I've never seen any local lady jockeys in the public toilets, at Moruya, so they must have a room of their own somewhere?!
    Espera
    4th Nov 2015
    12:17pm
    Amelia Thoedorakis, who wrote the article above, has misnamed the strapper as "Billy"
    , but the ABC, and all the other media I have seen and read has him as "Stevie".
    Shoddy reporting Amelia.
    Kaye Fallick
    4th Nov 2015
    12:58pm
    Espera, well spotted - Amelia and i are currently arguing over whose fault it is - i say mine, for sharing that line, she says she should have checked it - either way, our bad! He is Stevie and had the biggest smile on the track....go Stevie!
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    12:59pm
    And whilst we are correcting the author:

    "However, not all horses escaped the race victorious." No they didn't! Only ONE is ever victorious.

    Perhaps they meant " Not all horses escaped unscathed"?
    Kaye Fallick
    4th Nov 2015
    1:38pm
    Yes KSS another good point - it might be argued that there were three winners, but such pedantry wouldn't become us ;-)
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    9:53am
    is misinformation to be a legacy of cutting staff such as proof readers??

    There were many winners because of the Melbourne Cup yesterday. The Payne family, the owners of the horse, Melbourne and Australia. All because of a petite and feminine young lady name Payne and a very fast horse. Thank you Michelle. I am so proud to be Australian.

    4th Nov 2015
    12:19pm
    Women could/would excel at a lot more if they just gave it a try, rather than complaining all the time about how downtrodden, over-looked, and demeaned they are.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:15pm
    Fast eddie, I think a lot of women do but give it up out of frustration.
    MITZY
    4th Nov 2015
    1:47pm
    I guess there hasn't always been a large number of female journalists in times gone by, only the odd one or two pioneers in the field, but times change and the scales tip in a different direction.
    There are female doctors, dentists, bankers, lawyers, judges, scientists, pollies, even females on building sites, all vying for positions of equality previously dominated by males. I doubt if a male protested against another male it would hardly raise a whisper.
    Politicians are a good example.
    Alula
    4th Nov 2015
    2:01pm
    Fast Eddy, try being downtrodden, overlooked and demeaned all your life on the basis of your gender and see how confident you are about giving it a try. I speak from experience.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    2:13pm
    Alula you must be a present day male.
    Amelia
    4th Nov 2015
    2:32pm
    I tend to agree with Alula. There are women in every industry fighting for the respect and opportunities that men are entitled to just by being born male (esp. Caucasian, straight, western males).

    Rap duo Salt n Pepa recently called out the reality a reality in the music industry, whereby it's hard for women to gain traction and backing unless they are given the seal of approval by a man first. This is not isolated to the music industry. I know this from what I read and what I've experienced.

    Don't forget that in practically every professional area, men claim ownership of the largest companies and industries. In equal parts, women must fight for their place in every industry, but men must be willing to give them space.

    There's a quote I remember hearing from a few years a go: not all men are powerful, but most power lies in the hands of men.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:02pm
    Amelia: whilst the glass ceiling is real women who fight for what they want often succeed. Gail Kelly, who recently quit after years of being Westpac CEO, is one of many who come to mind. My own daughter has made the point that ABILITY shines through.
    Women need to lead by demonstrating they can do a better job than their male peers and by not going off on maternity leave every few years. That is the way forward. Not bleating about not being given a go.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    9:59am
    the glass ceiling is there. And it is there to be broken. If a young thirty year old woman can do it, then any other woman too. I also believe that sometimes it is better below the glass ceiling :)
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    12:39pm
    Well I'll tell you what, the focus on advancing women in every blatantly sexist manner has done. It has ruined my marriage because I am absolutely devastated at men being ridiculed or subject of some goulash saliva driven celebration when ever a woman does something that men have done for years. Either that or a contrite put down.

    I worked in the Federal Government where frameworks to favour women are rife. Pure discrimination. I am mentally traumatised, fractured, by this. So I hope all women are
    happy. The attitude is culturally embedded. I really do not know what I ever did to women to deserve such treatment , which is unfit for the lowest of animals.
    Sundays
    4th Nov 2015
    1:05pm
    I worked in the Federal and State Governments. It's still a boys club, still far more women than men at the lower levels. Yes, women can get ahead, but still under represented. I never saw the quotas, or favouritism people refer to.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:09pm
    Most Departments, other than Defence have an overwhelming fe3male bias to the tune of 60% to 80%. 80% in Education Dept.
    Sundays
    4th Nov 2015
    1:22pm
    I think you're including teachers here, nevertheless more men in treasury, transport, finance, immigration. I could go on. Also, more men at the higher levels.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:35pm
    Wrong Sundays, but then again femism never worries about facts.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:37pm
    I meant feminism
    Alula
    4th Nov 2015
    2:08pm
    Gillham, you've obviously never investigated Women's Studies.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    2:13pm
    Alula, why would I. And where are the Male's Studies. Why not just Human Studies.
    Sundays
    4th Nov 2015
    2:18pm
    I actually looked at statistics, and annual reports, but hey probably compiled by women in the lower levels and probably biased and incorrect. You hate women, I get it
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    2:23pm
    I hate being put down as a male and that put down being the cultural norm. Did you look up the Uni entry rates. Why not do something about it. Oh that's right it favours w3omen.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:07pm
    I detect a raw nerve coming through. And rightly so.
    The teaching game is one of many where women have done nicely whilst men have been thrust to the back of the pack. And still women complain. How many male primary teachers have you seen lately? None?
    Women have also dominated nursing and never complained about the inequity of the profession.
    Now we see women bleating about the glass ceiling. Whilst they may have a case people need to remember that fairness has long gone and that we are in a race to the bottom.
    As I have said above I expect our system to be FAIR. To both sexes. That is what social harmony is about. What I do not enjoy is blatant discrimination of either sex. This is what needs to be stamped out.
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    5:41pm
    "The teaching game is one of many where women have done nicely whilst men have been thrust to the back of the pack. And still women complain. How many male primary teachers have you seen lately? None?"

    That is wrong. Men have NOT been thrust to the back of the pack. There are still more men, than women, in leadership positions in schools.

    And the reason there are not so many male teachers in primary schools is because far more women than men CHOOSE to teach at that level.
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    5:56pm
    Rod63 I agree with you up to a point. However, the real problem with the lack of male teachers in Primary Schools (and secondary schools come to that) is the very real fear they will be accused of child abuse. They are no longer willing to put themselves in that position and frankly I can't blame them. Its a touch of the 'all men are rapists' syndrome, and that is reprehensible.

    But as you say it has not prevented most leadership roles in education being filled by men.
    JAID
    5th Nov 2015
    9:41am
    Whether or not it is unfortunate that a gender balance does not exist among teachers it is not reasonable to suggest primarily that males have been pushed out of the area. True, some do not venture there because the numbers involved in child molestation do not give an innocent male and even start but for the most part fewer males desire to be teachers than females. You can expect these sorts of differences for all sorts of reasons, entirely valid or not but it doesn't help to find discrimination rather than potential anywhere.
    Alula
    5th Nov 2015
    10:33am
    Gillham, women have fought and continue to fight for equal rights for many very good reasons which I shouldn't have to tell you. If you are feeling the swing of the pendulum, I'm sorry for you: I believe we are in the middle of a gender revolution which you and I won't see resolved in our lifetimes.
    The media is largely to blame for the misrepresentations of feminism, and unfortunately some women have gone on a hate-men spree. However redressing a long-standing inequality shouldn't be seen as bias.
    There are one or two strands of feminism that are anti-men. However I prefer "socialist" feminism, which adds class into the gender mix. Hence a working class woman will have more in common with a working class man than with a woman from the upper echelons. Men are also oppressed by rigid gender roles and there's nothing stopping men from getting out and fighting these attitudes. There are a few men's groups around and all hail to them, but men, because of the gender stereotypes perhaps, are generally reluctant to join them, just as they are resistant to getting counselling when needed.
    Just consider how you and others are oppressed by the system we live under and fight that instead of this lateral violence you're seeming to propagate.
    peedee
    4th Nov 2015
    12:40pm
    I did not give a toss whether it was male of female who rode the cup winner. What impressed me were the values this lady personified. Hard work, working through adversity and looking after family by including brother Stevie in the TV interviews. I think many of our so called sporting super stars should take a life lesson from this very impressive lady
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    12:46pm
    Her values were OK until she took the opportunity to bad mouth every Australian male. Just like our illustrious former PM.
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    12:56pm
    No gillham put down that log on your shoulder for just a second. Ms Payne took a well deserved swipe at the male owners of the horse who did not want her ride for no other reason than that she is a woman. Well she showed them didn't she?

    Now you can resume carrying that log.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    12:59pm
    KSS the log is owned by a woman and has been handed around for decades, But they are not strong enough to hold it up.
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    1:05pm
    Good to see you are well balanced then gillham with a log on each shoulder.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:19pm
    Just like the men who put down the V8 women drivers Eh! gillham.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    1:21pm
    KSS, I don't know how much you know about horse racing or any sport for that matter but when it comes to winning at all costs nobody cares what sex you are. I do not believe for a moment that owners wanted her off because she was a woman. They may have had questions regarding her strength and endurance? They may have had thoughts about no woman jockey previously winning the race, but I doubt they wanted her off the mount because she was a woman. Michelle may have formed that opinion. It may become part of Australian folklore but I will not believe it for a moment.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:33pm
    Keep plugging away Wstaton., but the fe3male V8 drivers were a gimmick, not having to qualify through normal channels like their male rivals. Just a 'captains pick'.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:09pm
    I agree with you peedee. Michelle had every right to have a go at the racing system. What she did not do is demand equal numbers of jockeys from both sexes. This is precisely what women have been doing, but of course they shut up when numbers go the other way.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    5:43pm
    mick, that part will come later when she receives sports person of the year award, then Australian of the year!
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    5:43pm
    "What she did not do is demand equal numbers of jockeys from both sexes".

    No she didn't. The truth has become a casualty in this discussion.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    12:50pm
    This woman is not entitled to slam all men and then say aw but my Dad was good.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:20pm
    I think she was slamming the Jockey and racing culture.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:30pm
    I suppose the former female PM was doing similar with her sexist rant.
    Amelia
    4th Nov 2015
    2:37pm
    Gillham, I'm pretty certain she wasn't slamming all men, but speaking directly to those who wanted to kick her out.

    I think any of us who were doubted and cast down, would want to throw it back into the faces of those who doubted us when we proved them wrong. Regardless of gender.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    2:40pm
    The down cast of white males is endemic in our Society and I am letting you know I do not like it. It is force fed upon us on a daily basis.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:10pm
    She was not "slamming" all men. Just the racing fraternity because it is a 'boys club'. I'll back her for that.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    4:27pm
    I see it too Gillham, and I don't like it, but because it seems so illogical it doesn't seem to matter. I recall Gillard mentioning it a few times. It appears to be an idea imported from USA where it may may actually have some substance. But this is a multicultural country with 25% of our current population born overseas.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    10:34am
    hey Gill, suck it up. People like you give men a bad name. Most men are wonderful creatures ... and then we have... the rest. She was talking about the racing fraternity. Are you annoyed because a pretty young woman dared to mouth of at the patriarchal club.The racing fraternity is ruled by males.
    Are the posters saying because she dared to speak out against the 'establishment', she is demeaning all men?? Not right. There are many inequalities in racing. The world is not equal. It's not equal for men or women.

    So if you want to cry "poor, white male".... the suck it up like a man and be a man. I hear what you are saying but I also hear the anger . Get over it and maybe you will have more realistic arguments

    Case closed.
    .
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:06pm
    Well there is bias in the education system. What are we doing about that.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:25pm
    The culture in the Education department is having the top end being predominantly men.

    There is no culture of denying men becoming teachers. It's the same as nursing not really perceived as being a male job by most men.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:30pm
    Read slowly Wstaton, Outcomes in education were pretty stable until culpable, ulterior motives tweaked the system in favour of females. We now have women topping all subjects and gaining 60%+ of Uni entries.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    1:39pm
    Well now we have females tweaking the system to get higher scores at VCE that enables them to gain favourable entry into Uni's have we.

    My granddaughter last year got a score of 91.9 that certainly got her into uni over some men with lessor scores. Guess what! She worked diligently at school to get that. I fail to see how she could have tweaked the system in order to do so.

    I do understand that all students male or female take the same VCE don't they.

    Also If she passes her degrees with distinction I certainly would expect here to be offered a higher salary than a man without a distinction.
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    1:41pm
    Gillham, I heard that from a teacher in QLD who said that during the 1980's the retirement age was lowered to 57 and was a focus on reducing the number of male teachers.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:44pm
    Wstaton the framework was blatantly altered in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. Even maths was made non compulsory so girls could avaqid it. But there you go memory lapse of convenience . Why am I not surprised.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    1:46pm
    Got excited. meant 'avoided' until auto corrected.
    Wstaton
    4th Nov 2015
    2:30pm
    Whatever. But I do understand that various scores are adjusted depending upon the difficulty of the subjects as not to disadvantage those taking difficult subjects.

    This means that students taking subjects that are not difficult have to work harder to get a higher score.

    I do not know what your problem is but you seem to have one.

    So there was a deliberate policy to create an environment to advantage girls was there.

    There seems to be an even worse one to advantage men in most professions.
    gillham
    4th Nov 2015
    2:36pm
    Yes there was a policy to advance girls in education, and it remains because no one will tackle it.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:18pm
    wstaton: are you aware that in the late 1980s the NSW Department of Education changed the promotional system. Previous to that principal jobs were allocated on MERIT. After the change the FIRST 50% of promotional positions were offered to women. These ladies picked the prime schools for themselves. Then the remaining 50% was split between men and women. My understanding is that many of the ladies who took up positions in the 'bad' schools retired asap. Couldn't handle it. Bailed out.
    The other thing that crept in is that Maths was killed and the scaling system altered so that students picking the much harder 4 unit course could no longer use the favourable scaling. The result is that our brightest student pick what I believe is called 'vege' maths which takes up very little time for these bright students. The result is clear to see: Australia has AGAIN slipped further down the world rankings whilst our politicians run around waving their hands and blaming teachers for the slipping standards.
    Lets not talk about fairness and equity in education. It is a total disgrace how the political malfunction has all but destroyed what was one of the best systems on the planet.
    Alula
    5th Nov 2015
    12:53pm
    Studies of gender issues in nursing show that men predominantly climb to admin jobs, sometimes as a result of bias by older women in the profession. Until the 70s, men doing the same job as women in nursing were paid more because they were men.
    Gillham, it's also not so long since women weren't allowed to go to university. When they did, the food and accommodation were of poorer quality than for the men. Read Virginia Woolf's "A Room of One's Own".
    Could there be some sour grapes because sometimes women are smarter than men, now they have the opportunity to study?
    Adrianus
    5th Nov 2015
    1:28pm
    So, women are smarter than men? That is good news. How long before that intelligence is transferred to the chess board? How much longer will we need to wait for a female world champion?
    student
    6th Nov 2015
    10:05am
    good post Alula. I can not see the relevance of your post Frank.

    As for preferential treatment towards females in other posts, my experience at uni was eye-opening with the help given to mothers attending uni. They were given extensions for assignments, the same as young men working shift work and were allowed (but not encouraged thankfully) to bring children to tutorials and lectures. having said that, I really do think the racing fraternity needs to get their act together and give the proper and right accommodation for female jockeys to have change rooms. Or is that begrudged too? Are female jockeys to be denied a safe and private change room with their own shower and toilet??
    biddi
    4th Nov 2015
    1:36pm
    Okay. Now let's talk about the HORSES. Does anyone know what happens to the horses that run last?
    Amelia
    4th Nov 2015
    4:17pm
    Good point, biddi. I'm not aware. Is anyone else?
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:20pm
    Horses? What are they?
    Last runner probably hamburger meat. Just kidding.
    There was only 1 horse which broke down. I believe he was the oldest horse in the race and had come twice in the Cup on several occasions. Broken leg fixable and being put out to pasture. Lucky horse...and well deserved retirement!
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    4:48pm
    biddi many horses with a good temperament finish their racing and go to riding schools. You may have seen past cup winners being ridden by the clerk of the course or stewards. Some for show jumping, dressage. They are not much good for cattle mustering but some do that for training purposes.
    A few of the big stables with a focus on the bottom line like winners obviously but will keep feeding and training until the owners go broke or they get a request from an owner of a promising horse. In which case many get sold and finish at easier country tracks. Many of these trainers and owners have large paddocks where horses have a comfortable retirement. What I do understand about the industry is for the most part anyway. Horses love to run and they love to please their rider/trainer. Those in the industry become very attached to the animals they look after every day.
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    6:23pm
    Read this Biddi: https://rv.racing.com/welfare
    biddi
    4th Nov 2015
    7:59pm
    Thanks, Rod63. Wonder what happens to the missing 10 per cent
    of retired racehorses? Mick : 'Last runner probably hamburger meat' -
    wish you were kidding. A site for you Rod63 ..... Google
    Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses. Another side of the story.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    10:42am
    biddi, this is to be read with tongue in cheek ...

    The winning horse was ridden by a female and the last horse was ridden by a male. The winning horse went home and the losing horse went .. to McDonalds??
    biddi
    5th Nov 2015
    1:53pm
    It's a case of RUN FOR YOUR LIFE ..... literally.
    student
    6th Nov 2015
    10:08am
    good one biddi :)
    Spud
    4th Nov 2015
    1:43pm
    I'm not sure the article was factual in regard to Red Cadeux. The injury was to a sesamoid bone in his left fore fetlock. (not a broken leg) and I am unaware of any fall taking place.
    Loved to see Michelle win. Aussie battlers to the fore! :-)
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    1:49pm
    Amelia we 've got anther one down here!
    OK , KSS and Spud can write the next piece. ha ha ha ha!!
    Amelia
    4th Nov 2015
    2:40pm
    Fair point. The injury happened to the animal's left fetlock (ankle). So not exactly his leg, but not too far off.
    Polly Esther
    4th Nov 2015
    3:32pm
    Congratulations young lady, you deserve it all.
    Oh and guys, really, many of you have once again proved that jealousy really is a curse.
    When will some of you realise that gender has nothing to do with it... She was just too damn good.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:22pm
    No jealousy Polly. Nothing worse than crying unfairness when you are plundering your way through life. Reverse sexism with never a mention in the media is what it is: perverse!
    Brissiegirl
    4th Nov 2015
    3:54pm
    Lovely all-Australian success story. Couldn't care less about the gender thing. When women paint the spouting, mow lawns uphill, fix the car, lift the furniture, do roadworks, make concrete drives, work 50 floors up on construction sites, lay bricks until their backs are busted, then I'll say we are equally capable at most everything. I'm so over the focus on girls this and girls that and the over-focus on girls in the schools (that's been going on for so long that boys have fallen way behind). Despite all the women's "rights", women's organisations for health etc. etc., they (not me) are still moaning that it's not enough (and probably enough will never happen - it's more, more, more). When women complain they are expected to do so much it's because we painted ourselves into a corner and now don't like what we fought for. No wonder men don't want commitment who wants to be hammered about equality every day in this world of equals where everyone is equal except when it comes to the heavy lifting.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:25pm
    I am sure women are most capable of many things. Always good to see the very few walking the walking rather than talking the BS talk.
    Agree with the last bit Brissiegirl. Germaine Greer and many like her are very unhappy old women. Self inflicted.
    Good to see you have a sense of fairness. That quality seems to have gone out the window in the war of the roses. Ta.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:06am
    Mick, when feminism first started, it did a lot of damage to women. It tried to give middle class white women's values to all women regardless of colour, nationality, or class. Steiner and her crew in USA still seem to be going the 'one size fits all' creed, and it doesn't. I was very lucky to be able to argue my case that something was not degrading to women and thus not bash men (a hint to my argument .. remember Loretta Bobbit??) Fairness and equality are not only in the feminist mantra, they should be in LIFE. No one it better than another and we all react to life's breaks differently. If you feel down trodden then the chances are you allow yourself to be walked all over. There are more services for women because there are more women needing these services. Yes, men do get bashed but most of the perpetrators are men and the victims women.

    I am not sprouting feminism, I am only trying to help you see the full picture. Most feminist love men :)
    Digger
    4th Nov 2015
    4:19pm
    Wow a lot of pent up anger obviously telling everyone to get stuffed, particularly when everyone are not all mysoginist or chauvinistic pigs. It sort of dampened the feeling of elation to us ordinary folk who really only have a little flutter once a year and want to celebrate her wonderful achievement. Gai Waterhouse maintains her femaninity and doesn't tell everyone to get stuffed when her horses win big races. Cathy Freeman didn't tell everyone to get stuffed after winning gold at the 2000 Olympics - she maintained her dignity and femaninity. I could go on with many other woman who have risen to the top.
    MICK
    4th Nov 2015
    4:29pm
    We all heard the serve DIgger. I think that this was years of pressure building up and I tend to feel that Michelle handled it correctly. Fired a broadside. Short and sweet but made the point. She did have a case!
    I saw Cathy Freeman win the 400 m at the Sydney Olympics. A wonderful night of competition. The difference between Cathy and Michelle is that women have their own race whilst Michelle was actively targeted to be removed from racing. I do not agree with that as is is blatantly unfair.
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    5:37pm
    Digger, she didn't tell "everyone" to get stuffed. Where did you get that monstrous idea? She is a wonderful, well-spoken young woman and you do her a great disservice.

    Read the story again!!!
    Adrianus
    4th Nov 2015
    5:38pm
    mick, I doubt very much that Michelle was "actively targeted to be removed from racing." because she is a woman as you infer. Many jockeys would be not in favour with owners for one reason or another. And for various reasons they prefer other jockeys. I have never heard a male jockey telling everyone to get stuffed after a win. But I don't disapprove because Payne spoke from the heart and gave us an indication of how tough the industry is, and how hard it has been for her. It kind of reminds me of what Jeff Fenech said after he won the world title, "I love yas all" or something like that. It's great to catch people at a time of pure elation when they are winners, as it was with Michelle Payne. Alan Bond said it with his Swan Beer ad. "For all of those who've made it, this beers for you!"
    But I still prefer Michelle's "For those who said I couldn't do it, you can all get stuffed" or words to that effect. :)
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:14am
    mick, Rod63 and Frank,thank you for not taking away the glory of a wonderful achievement for that young lady. She will go down in history . I am still so very happy for her and will be every Melb. Cup day to come.

    4th Nov 2015
    5:46pm
    If you REALLY want to put a cat amongst the pigeons, just think about all the freebies, kudos, benefits, government incentives, vouchers, entitlement cards, handouts, etc, etc you would receive if you were a black, uneducated, unemployed, gay, now female transgender. Now put your mind to this statement and try to determine if it is prejudiced, racist, sexist, Chauvinist, stupid, true, or none or a combination of the above. Just a bit of food for thought and not meant to make you froth at the mouth with hate or disdain.
    KSS
    4th Nov 2015
    8:00pm
    You forgot to add 'disabled childless single parent' to your list Fast Eddie. haha
    Anonymous
    4th Nov 2015
    8:29pm
    How could a childless person be a parent? ha ha.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:15am
    suck it up FAST, Eddie.
    Colours
    4th Nov 2015
    6:00pm
    I fail to see how the fact that a woman can whip horses as well as men is somehow a victory for women. It is simply a publicity angle for a cruel and vicious industry posing as a sport.
    Rod63
    4th Nov 2015
    6:23pm
    Wrong Colours.

    https://rv.racing.com/welfare
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:18am
    did you see how many times she 'whipped' the horse?
    Rod63
    5th Nov 2015
    1:11pm
    They wave the whip a lot in a whipping action without striking. The number of hits at various stages, is strictly controlled.
    Young
    4th Nov 2015
    6:17pm
    Loved her win.Great for racing.Even though I had bet on other horses I was so pleased for her and Stevie.There certainly has bee bias against women n the racing industry and good on you Michelle for speaking up.
    Lisbeth
    4th Nov 2015
    6:30pm
    Richard Perham, senior jockeys’ tutor at the British Racing School, recently said some trainers and owners were “still living in the dark ages” in their refusal to employ female jockeys. And so it is for far too many of the men commenting on this page. I am getting pretty tired of the 'dark ages' sexism spouted here. For goodness sake the past 2000 years has been a patriarchal quota system where women were excluded from power and privilege. One of the first things you should perhaps get to grips with is: if you believe in equality of rights and opportunity between women and men, then you are a feminist by definition. And secondly, if you believe that society should simply be about "equalism" or "humanism" over and above the ideas historically associated with feminism, then for the sake of consistency, you should also decry the civil rights movement of the 1960s. However, historically we know that it was not sufficient to argue for humanism as the cure for racism - racism had to be tackled with direct reference to the problems that caused it - discrimination and ingrained (mistaken) beliefs about the inferiority of certain racial and ethnic groups. Feminism is the same - it is a necessary set of ideas designed to tackle the specific problems of discrimination and ingrained cultural beliefs about women that limit their opportunities in ways that extend beyond official notions of "rights" and civil legislative frameworks. Anyone who believes otherwise is naive at best, part of the problem at least, and at worst, an active participant in human oppression.
    Brissiegirl
    4th Nov 2015
    10:23pm
    A "cure for racism". Tell that to the Japanese who unashamedly protect and preserve a pure race. Japanese are quietly amused at Australian laws which patronise Asians and various other ethnic groups by officially disallowing unfavourable comment about their race. "You westerners are so insecure, so superior that you even make laws to prevent yourselves from looking down at Asians. You are so stupid you haven't even learned that we have always known we are nicer, smarter and wiser than you."
    As for discrimination against women - look outside your front door one day and let us know one thing you see that a woman built for the common good of both genders. There is nothing - because it is men who do the heavy lifting and women who do the heavy complaining.
    Anonymous
    4th Nov 2015
    11:21pm
    Australia, or any other country, love it or leave it.
    roy
    5th Nov 2015
    10:15am
    What's she doing out of the kitchen anyway?
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:37am
    Brissiegirl, what's your beef?? Do you want to know one thing that a woman has built for the common good of all?? A home. And what about the women left here in Aus. during the WW1 and WW2, who ran farms for food for the population and ran the mills that made uniforms for the soldiers. As for heavy lifting .. when I was married (I am now a widow) my husband got me a job as a brickies labourer so I could be home when the children came home. I moved over a ton of top dressing to the back yard, and didn't complain. I helped lay the concrete paths, and my husband bought me my very own electric cement mixer to make life easier for me. So don't tell me men do all of the heavy lifting. I know a lot of women who have worked along side men and are not whiners. My daughter at the age of 17 was regenerating a bush garden complete with a lake and walk-way in the Mountains.
    JAID
    5th Nov 2015
    12:40pm
    Lisbeth, talk of liberty while actively limiting the potential of others on the basis of their group form is an awful self-deceipt. So, I do agree with you and wholly in regard to the aim and for that matter the necessity. What I have a problem with generally in these matters is the prescription.

    Take racial equality in the States which you bring up by way of comparison. The work of the 1960's was, amazingly, a major undertaking after the work of the 1860's which could hardly be called less; 1 in 25 american males died with 1 in a dozen casualties, untold numbers of women and children of both colours would also have been casualties. Although situations are different and 150 odd years was a lot different to now, despite a laudable element in his aim I can only see Lincoln as one of the ogres of the 19th century. I cannot see Martin Luther King the same way but that casualties may be fewer does not mean there are not better ways of achieving things.

    It belittles humanity to think individuals on balance cannot see merit in liberty. We cloud the subject in control and in seeking blame for disadvantage we muddy waters with expedience, efficiency and equality, where, opportunity, the bridging and broaching of hurdles, dreams and expression can leave the politics of change in its wake.
    particolor
    4th Nov 2015
    8:08pm
    Too Easy ..
    On Sundays Paper was a picktur of Darren Hayes wearing Number 38 ! I said I cant back Number 38 in the Melbourne Cup ? I'll cut it in Half Number 19 ! :-) :-) :-) And nothing to do with Sheilas !! :-) :-)
    Polly Esther
    5th Nov 2015
    1:44pm
    good on you Parti, happy for you mate!!!!
    Young
    4th Nov 2015
    8:24pm
    And did you hav a bet on 19 particolour?
    particolor
    4th Nov 2015
    9:52pm
    Yeah !! A Measelly Fiver !! :-( BUT I got 550 Back !! :-) :-) :-) Don't know whether to Declare it to Stinky Centrelink or Not?? :-) :-)
    Or Buy 10 Kilo's of Prawns and Hide them in the Freezer ?? :-)
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:40am
    oh particolor, choices, choices, choices!! Congrats and I am so happy for you. (I wont tell if you don't)
    HOLA
    5th Nov 2015
    8:44am
    Good on you Particolor, I love to hear of a win for the pensioners. And yes, I would love to
    tell quite a few people to "get stuffed" as well. Cheers !!
    particolor
    5th Nov 2015
    2:57pm
    I hear "Stuff Off" Quit a lot here where I live !! :-) :-) :-)
    Lisbeth
    5th Nov 2015
    10:48am
    Brissiegirl you begin by totally misunderstanding my point, to go off on an irrelevant racist rant and then continue on to erroneously conflate who built our built environment with whether women should be allowed to be considered equal. As if buildings is the only thing that determines your status as an equal human!! Not to mention the fact that women have been excluded historically from building, engineering, trades etc. And still experience enormous discrimination getting qualifications and jobs in these areas. Nevertheless women are beginning to contribute markedly to our built environment as vast numbers are now becoming architects, project managers, engineers, tradies etc.
    But really Brissie Girl (are you really a girl???) it is not my job to educate you or remove such gender bias from your life. You can wallow in your own ignorance.
    student
    5th Nov 2015
    11:42am
    I agree Lisabeth.
    particolor
    5th Nov 2015
    2:59pm
    Well may You say God Save The Queen !
    But who is going to Save the Male Jockeys NOW !!
    :-) :-) :-)
    roy
    5th Nov 2015
    8:05pm
    I think that it was really nice of the men to let her win, 10 out of 10 guys.
    HOLA
    6th Nov 2015
    8:37am
    Ladies before Gentlemen, of course.
    PIXAPD
    8th Nov 2015
    7:15pm
    Mr Ed would have something to say about this....' Wilbur, Wilbur, I have something to say...'
    particolor
    8th Nov 2015
    8:16pm
    So would Radish ! :-)
    maxchugg
    10th Nov 2015
    11:52am
    Mick, I agree with you 100% I'm beginning to think that the endless self promotion of women by themselves does them more harm than good. One could be excused for thinking that when a woman achieves something special it is a rare and notable event.
    As for quotas for women in parliament, totally unnecessary. All that is needed is for all women to vote for female candidates, as women are over 50% of the population


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