16th May 2017

New Budget measures could help older Australians stay at home longer

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A boost for aged care funding
Leon Della Bosca

Along with our ageing population comes the need for improved aged care and home support services. With this in mind, the Government has given a funding boost to services for older Australians, but is it enough?

Many older Australians will benefit from the $5.5 billion announced in the Federal Budget 2017/18 that will help to extend funding to the Commonwealth Home Support Programme, which will provide assistance for people who wish to stay in their own homes for longer.

The program will be extended for two years from 1 July 2018.

“This home support program provides a range of essential services such as the popular meals on wheels, personal care, nursing and allied health and respite services, said Minister for Aged Care, Ken Wyatt.



“In addition the funding includes help with services like cleaning and shopping, home maintenance and modifications – basic but essential services for older people who choose to stay in their homes as they age.

“This funding will provide continuity of essential support services to around 900,000 older Australians to help them continue living at home and in their communities.”

Along with this measure, Mr Wyatt announced that funding for aged care over the next five years will be $99.3 billion and will include expanding the aged care workforce to 980,000 by 2050.

“A strategic approach to building workforce capacity is needed given the significant structural changes now underway in aged care,” said Mr Wyatt.

“Improving access to a supply of workers is a major factor in sustaining services in regional, rural, remote and outer suburban locations.”

The announcement comes ahead of an independent review of the Commonwealth’s aged care quality regulatory processes.

The Australian Aged Care Quality Agency’s report is due on 31 August 2017.

“As the Australian population ages we owe it to our nation builders to provide access to the very best quality care and safety,” said Mr Wyatt.

Read more at www.health.gov.au

Is the Government doing enough to make aged care more accessible for older Australians? Are you please with this announcement? Would you prefer to stay at home for longer or move into an aged care facility?

Related articles:
Aged care processes to be reviewed
How home care packages have changed
Home care versus aged care





COMMENTS

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MICK
16th May 2017
11:27am
The government giveth with one hand and taketh (a lot more) with the other. I thought that it wanted people to downsize so that it could keep retirees off a rightful pension which is paid in all other first world countries? Maybe Australia is different.
Hasbeen
16th May 2017
12:50pm
My first thought too Mick.

It's a pity these departments can't talk to each other, BEFORE they start wasting our taxes. Do they want us to stay in the family home, or do they want us in some boxy unit somewhere.

I currently have 3 cats a dog a bleeding horse & one kid, all of whom need somewhere to stay for a while. All this gets expensive.

I'd happily move to somewhere smaller, but I need a 6 car garage, 3 for our cars, & the rest for my tools & gear. I may never use them again, but it is nice to keep them as insurance, in case I do have to do some real work again.
MICK
16th May 2017
1:00pm
Get rif of the kid and the horse and you'll be able to live in Point Piper (kidding).
The issue the rats who run the nation fail to want to see is that there are a whole pile of reasons why people want to continue living in the family home. If it is usable space they are worried about then they need to help fuel a house building boom. Problem solved.
I don't have a 6 car garage but can relate to your issue. My 2 car equivalent is always full and leftover work tolls I think I might use some day (I am kidding myself) take up a fair amount of room. Better to chuck them out and buy another set of skis.....(not serious).
We have to face one of the realities of aging, the mind may be willing but when it is time to start work the body says otherwise. Luckily gardens do not take no for an answer.
Pickles
16th May 2017
2:58pm
My wife and I recently "downsized " from a house with a large yard to an apartment and the costs of doing so came to approx. $35 k which in some ways was reasonable However the most difficult part was finding an apartment suitable for older people We are both in our 80's and when you look at units if they are in a block of 3 stories with a basement car park then most of these buildings do not have a lift so you would be limited to a ground floor unit Not everybody wants to do this so many people who want to down size will not do so because of limited access or choice of units/apartments available
shirboy
16th May 2017
3:10pm
If the government would cut out the red tape costs of downsizing, more oldies would be inclined to move to appropriate abodes.
Triss
16th May 2017
5:05pm
Lazy policies. Take a fairly defenceless section of the population and chuck $5 billion into the ring and you'll be knocked over by investors rushing to increase their bottom line with accommodation bonds. Profit comes miles ahead of comfort and care for elderly residents.
Over the past few years nursing staff have been cut, cut and cut again, our elderly in care homes are becoming products that can be profited from. Profits increase and care decreases and the government and ministers couldn't care less.
crazypete
16th May 2017
6:02pm
what good is down sizing as there are a lot of elderly people that like having a nice garden where they sit out side to relax and some like to have a shade house where they grow orchids
for something to do so really the government does not care but only themselves so wake up and do some thinking or is it to hard for you.
Virginia
17th May 2017
8:50pm
My dad is 97 and ACAT accessed as high dependency.
He wishes to stay in his own home but I can only get a low dependency Home Care Package for 30 mins per day for him... I will need one soon as I am wearing out veery fast.