Key challenges for the re-elected Coalition government: Conversation experts respond

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The Conversation experts take a closer look at what’s in store for the country in five key policy areas: health, tax, education, infrastructure and the environment.

Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-NDCorey J. A. Bradshaw, Flinders University; Miranda Stewart, University of Melbourne; Peter Goss, Grattan Institute; Phillip O’Neill, Western Sydney University, and Stephen Duckett, Grattan Institute

The Coalition has won the federal election. So what will this mean for key policy areas?

Conversation experts take a closer look at what’s in store for health, taxes, the environment, education and infrastructure – five of the most closely watched policy areas in the election campaign.

Environment
Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Matthew Flinders Fellow in Global Ecology, Flinders University

Environment Minister Melissa Price has not been in the portfolio for long — only since August 2018 — but has already developed a strong reputation for either being silent, or merely rubber-stamping Coalition policies.

On the latter, she has never voted against the majority of her party since entering parliament in 2013, which means she voted against the carbon price, boosting investments in renewable energy, stronger marine and freshwater conservation measures and protecting the Great Barrier Reef.

But since taking over the portfolio, her low profile has meant that she has not voted on much environmental legislation at all, and she has regularly turned down requests to be interviewed on her party’s environmental policies, or to participate in a debate.

In fact, she was even absent from the prime minister’s launch of the Coalition’s environment platform in early May, except for a media release referencing the promise to provide A$100 million to tackle biodiversity loss – an amount deemed inadequate by experts. She has also been consistently silent following various environmental catastrophes such as intense bushfires, floods and fish kills in the Murray-Darling.

Her most recent notoriety arose from her signing off on the Adani groundwater management plan for the highly controversial Carmichael coalmine immediately before the 2019 election was called, despite condemnation from different research agencies.

In a similar move, she then approved the Yeelirrie uranium mine in her own electorate of Durack in Western Australia, despite the warning in 2016 by the state’s Environment Protection Authority of the high threat of extinction the mine posed to native animals.

Previously, she approved a controversial tourism development in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area by concluding it should be exempt from assessment under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act. She was also allegedly in breach of the EPBC Act itself by delaying decisions on species threat listing — an ironic act considering that her own electorate of Durack has the highest number of threatened species of any Australian electorate.

Price also challenged the advice of hundreds of the world’s top climate scientists that emissions must reach zero by 2050 in order to stop global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius. She also repeats the Coalition mantra that Australia will meet its international emissions-reductions commitments, despite emissions continuing to rise. However, she has recently acquiesced and at least admitted that many environmental disasters in Australia are in fact linked to climate change.

Finally, Price is probably most infamous for insulting the former president of Kiribati by accusing him of being in Australia only “for the cash” — a denigrating comment for a nation in great peril due to climate change.

Taxes
Miranda Stewart, Professor of Law, University of Melbourne Law School

Returning as treasurer, Josh Frydenberg can count on a mandate for the LNP program of income tax cuts put in place at the last budget. These tax cuts deliver a substantial permanent reduction in tax for wealthy Australians and flatten the overall tax rate structure. But for middle income earners, they barely return bracket creep.

These are going to cost a lot of money over time. A lot more could be done to secure the tax base – increasing its efficiency and fairness, easing compliance and administrative burdens, and closing the tax gap. That includes fixing holes in the income tax base and broadening the base – especially work-related deductions, and addressing the gaps in the GST. But none of that seems likely to happen in this term of government.

What is the LNP tax policy apart from income tax cuts? As usual, there’s a long list of unlegislated tax measures to modify details of the tax system and fix problems in it. But there’s not much big tax policy in the LNP’s agenda.

There is bipartisan support for ensuring multinationals pay their fair share of tax. The G20 ministers will be deciding on – or derailing – proposals to tax the large digital tech companies next month. Australia may need to decide whether it will seek to implement a digital services tax on the tech giants (a decision deferred following a treasury discussion paper last year), or throw support behind a US proposal to allocate their profits more fairly around the globe.

The LNP has a problem with corporate tax domestically. Having failed to persuade the people or the Senate to cut the corporate tax rate to 25% – in spite of rates trending down around the world – its unlikely to have any better luck this time around.

Oh, and your franking credit refund, trust income splitting, superannuation concessions, negative gearing and capital gains tax 50% discount are safe, too.

The Coalition’s tax policies focus on simplifying the tax system, and will cost the government A$158 billion over the next ten years. David Crosling/AAP

Education
Peter Goss, School Education Program Director, Grattan Institute

The re-elected Coalition government has some big policy decisions to make. In early childhood education, the Coalition needs to shift focus. It favours childcare at the expense of preschool, but both need investment.

Preschool funding for 4-year-olds has once again been rolled over for just one year. The focus on attendance by disadvantaged children is good, though modest. The Coalition must also pay more attention to quality.

School funding is unfinished business. Dan Tehan’s first action as education minister was a peace deal with Catholic and independent schools. Most of the extra funding was appropriate, but the A$1.2 billion Choice and Affordability Fund was rapidly, and rightly, labelled a slush fund. It should be scrapped.

Last December’s National School Reform Agreement with the states made matters worse. With the Commonwealth’s blessing, states must ensure private schools, but not public schools, reach 100% of their funding targets.

States can use accounting tricks such as depreciation to meet their Gonski commitments. With depreciation, states can claim the up-front cost of school buildings, which can’t be used to hire teachers, as part of their contribution towards operating costs.

While all three school sectors will get funding increases under the Coalition, current policy settings won’t reverse the effect of the past decade, when nearly all the extra resources went to private schools.

Beyond funding, most of the Coalition’s other policy plans are sensible enough, but small-scale in nature. Many are in progress, but several will be hard to implement. The most promising is the national evidence institute, so long as it is set up with real independence and a broad remit.

Health
Stephen Duckett, Director, Health Program, Grattan Institute

The Coalition made few new health promises during the campaign. Nonetheless, life will not be easy for the minister, Greg Hunt, on his return to the health portfolio.

The first task will be getting the 2019 budget through parliament and implemented.

An important initiative in the budget was the introduction of a GP enrolment payment for people over 70. This was recommended by last year’s review of the Medicare Benefits Scheme, but the details still have to be negotiated. Even if the new payment is successfully introduced, more will need to be done to improve primary care.

High on Hunt’s agenda will be the unmentionables – all the things the Coalition avoided talking about in the campaign but which nevertheless loom as challenges in health policy.


Big challenges await Greg Hunt as he returns to the health portfolio.
Lukas Coch/AAP

One of these items is whether private health insurance remains viable into the future, for instance. The recent introduction of Gold, Silver, Bronze, and Basic products will not be enough to fix industry sustainability.

Hunt will also need to finalise a new agreement with the states on public hospital funding. The new minister will have to clean up the mess the Royal Commission on Aged Care has uncovered.

And he will have to tackle the issue of rising out-of-pocket costs for patients. Making doctors’ fees more transparent won’t fix the problem – and the Coalition hasn’t yet given any sign that it is willing to fill the biggest gap in our health system, by committing to a universal dental care scheme for Australia.

Infrastructure
Phillip O’Neill, Director, Centre for Western Sydney, Western Sydney University

The infrastructure landscape has changed massively since the days when public works, as they were known, were funded from government balance sheets and run by utilities and government agencies.

Banks, financial services providers, savings and investment funds – especially superannuation funds – dominate energy, telecommunications and metropolitan motorway spending. Airports, sea ports and freight rail are run by private capital. Public transport is increasingly delivered via public private partnerships.

Only urban water remains overwhelming in public hands, although behind each city utility lies thick portfolios of private supply and maintenance contracts.

A role for private capital in public infrastructure has become normal, and there seems to be political acceptance of this. Yet there hasn’t been a withdrawal of public sector involvement, and this needs stressing.

But the format for infrastructure ownership and delivery following this election is far from clear.

Three things need sorting:

– The first is the political process for identifying how large infrastructure projects are chosen. The planning capabilities of our governments seem long gone. The idea of an independent agency with clear objective vision – such as Infrastructure Australia at the federal level – struggles for legitimacy. The possibility that private sector operators might meet public needs via “unsolicited proposals” has been exposed as heightened rent-seeking.

– The second is the role of government in capital formation and risk-taking. In the New South Wales Treasury, this role is outsourced to global financial services firms. Deal-making is opaque, contracts are secret, long-term public liabilities are unknown and the public interest hasn’t been guaranteed.

– The third is the value placed on externalities – the expectation that infrastructure will make a city more habitable, more resilient and fairer. This aspiration is foreign territory.

We have had a quarter century of infrastructure experimentation. Rightly, the old left remains unconvinced about the merits of the project. Time for our new federal government to deliver.The Conversation

Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Matthew Flinders Fellow in Global Ecology and Models Theme Leader for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, Flinders University; Miranda Stewart, Professor, University of Melbourne; Peter Goss, School Education Program Director, Grattan Institute; Phillip O’Neill, Director, Centre for Western Sydney, Western Sydney University, and Stephen Duckett, Director, Health Program, Grattan Institute

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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219 Comments

Total Comments: 219
  1. 0
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    The biggest challenge facing this government is honesty. It pulled the wool over the electorates eyes during the election process but it’s credibility won’t last much longer for those who think. Already one of its key promises, the $1,000 tax cut is now unlikely to be delivered until next year, not this year even though it could be backdated as has occurred before. If it didn’t know what the legislative process was to get this through parliament in time then should it be in government? It was Morrison who decided that Parliament would sit for only 10 days before the election so he had control over the timing and process to get this through Parliament before the election if he wanted to. As he said, if you can’t manage money you can’t run the country it seems he’s proven his credentials in the first few days on the new Government.

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      Yes, and they borrowed another $150 million 5 days before the election. The Reserve Bank is tipped to lower interest rates due to a slowing economy, housing prices are still falling and Telstra and the Banks have lowered their latest dividends. Big challenges ahead especially to deliver the promised surplus

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      Viking…The Liberals always break promises. That’s typical.

      If Queensland hasn’t had of the past 6 years then they can watch Morrison fall on his sword.

      The Coalition has caused them so many problems and they refuse to believe it. I am aware they are slow but they have had 6 years to wake up.

      They never gave Labor a chance because they would not have jobs. Shorten would have arranged something but this Government won’t.

      ADANI will stuff up precious water just like that terrible Joyce did. All for China not Australians. The Scandinavian countries heavily tax mining companies unlike Australia which doesn’t charge tax, supplies FREE water all for a handful of jobs for Australians.

      Australians are not a bright lot if they allow this to happen instead of creating their own industries.

      Stop being lazy and relying on Chinese imports. Look at what China is doing in Fiji.

      Australia invention is embraced by Germany and they don’t have as much sun as us. So many countries use alternative power. Adelaide is happy with theirs because conventional power fails for them.

      Australians are not progressive at all.

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      No Jackie it is the ALP who always break promises, the ALP has had 6 years to present their policies and came across as incompetent at best , or evil and mendacious at worst. So glad Shorten fell on his sword but he has been great for the LNP. Gotta luv him for that. Just imagine if the ALP had got in everything would have been so much worse for everyone especially the Aussie battlers, and the poorer end of town. Shorten clearly couldn’t’t arrange himself out of a wet paper bag, but I can guarantee he would be able to if there was self interest and cash in it for him. Cant help but feel sorry for his first wife who he was, so it is reported , cheating on. Find it it hard to believe as he is so unpleasant to look at, and so unattractive in every aspect.

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      You may claim Australian are not progressive at all (whatever that is) but I suspect we should all be thankful for it, but the ALP is certainly regressive.

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      Digby, PALMER GETS HIS COAL MINE

      MURDOCH WILL GET THE ABC

      ELECTRICITY COMPANIES WILL GET THEIR PRICE HIKE

      WE WILL GET SHAFTED AGAIN

      WE WILL GET HIGHER POWER PRICES

      WE WILL GET MORE CUTS TO PENALTY RATES

      WE WILL GET A LOWER MINIMUM WAGE

      WE WILL GET MORE JOB INSECURITY

      WE WILL GET MEDICINES TAKEN OFF THE PBS FROM JULY THE FIRST

      WE WILL GET CUTS TO PENSIONS HEALTHCARE AND EDUCATION

      BUT WHAT THE HELL A FEW THOUSAND VERY WEALTHY PROPLE WILL GET TO KEEP THEIR YEARLY FREE GIFT FROM THE TAXPAYER WITH THEIR FRANKING CREDITS

      GINA RINEHART, BIG MINING AND BIG BANKS WILL GET THEIR $87BILLION TAX GIFT

      BUT THATS WHAT WE VOTED FOR.

      FROM ALL THE PENSIONERS. THE SICK. THE BATTLERS. THE HOMELESS. THE UNEMPLOYED. THE DISABLED. THE KINDERGARDENS. WE SAY THANK YOU AUSTRALIA FOR VOTING FOR A RUPERT MURDOCH OWNED GOVERNMENT

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      Hey Jackie you will whip yourself into a frenzy with the way you are behaving.

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      And as I have said Jackie, isn’t all all so wonderful that the electorate rejected you fear mongering lies as you have so succinctly stated them. As a doctor (specialists from not GP) I know that that nothing but ineffective medicines will be taken off the PBS form I july, and everything you have listed above would be even worse under a Labor government. The LNP have proved themselves the party preferred by the battlers, homeless , disabled etc., hell even someone like you would be protected by them That is how wonderful our democracy is

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      jackie, I think you need to contact the Samaritans ASAP.

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      Jackie, don’t shed too many tears for the pensioners under a Morrison government. A fair chunk of the pensioner cohort must have voted LNP. We know that historically something like two-thirds of retirees are conservative. We also know something like 80% of retirees receive the pension, two-thirds of these a full pension. My back of the envelope calc estimates at least 30% of full pensioners are voting LNP. Only a small number of these needed to change their vote to change the government. Choices have consequences.

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      Now they are going after the unions. The employers want this. Funnily, one of our sons talked about employers today in relation to unions.
      Farside, no one in our family voted for LNP not even indirectly. Some in Qld did but not our immediate family.
      Yes Jackie, spot on!
      Digby, I doubt you are a medical doctor. I have never heard a medical practitioner espouse your views.
      I am somewhat heartened to hear so many good people speaking up.

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      Sorry to disappoint Paddy, but I am a doctor (specialist medical practitioner) and as well tend to mix with others of similar beliefs ( as do LNP voters) my other medical mates (but not all) tend to agree with my political views. But Paddington i can just easily claim I don’t believe you are an Australian (but rather a 12 year old chinese hacker) with the anti Australian views you espouse. Just because one has medical degrees it stop one’s critical thinking abilities quite the opposite. The fact that you have never heard a medical practitioner espies similar views to me only proves my point above we all tend to mix with others of similar views. I am heartened to know the electorate got it so right.

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      Viking, the tax cuts have only been delayed until next financial year, not next century. The next financial year is 39 days away!

      Jackie, the people of Queensland obviously wanted the Adani coalmine because they wanted jobs, and to refer to them as “a little slow” because they didn’t vote the way you, apparently of superior intelligence, wanted, does come across as extreme arrogance.

      You must be one of an extremely small number of people who think Morrison is likely to fall on his sword. By winning the last “unwinnable” election for the Coalition his standing in his party will be massively enhanced and his chances of remaining in the office of P.M. until the next election have to be rated as excellent.

      As for your comment that Bill Shorten would have done an unspecified “something” for those in Queensland who desperately want employment, maybe the tooth fairy might also have come to the rescue.

      At risk of doing you an injustice, your other comments indicating that the re-election of the coalition will be the end of civilization as we know it does come over as being slightly hysterical, but we wait and see.

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      Viking, the tax cuts have only been delayed until next financial year, not next century. The next financial year is 39 days away!

      Jackie, the people of Queensland obviously wanted the Adani coalmine because they wanted jobs, and to refer to them as “a little slow” because they didn’t vote the way you, apparently of superior intelligence, wanted, does come across as extreme arrogance.

      You must be one of an extremely small number of people who think Morrison is likely to fall on his sword. By winning the last “unwinnable” election for the Coalition his standing in his party will be massively enhanced and his chances of remaining in the office of P.M. until the next election have to be rated as excellent.

      As for your comment that Bill Shorten would have done an unspecified “something” for those in Queensland who desperately want employment, maybe the tooth fairy might also have come to the rescue.

      At risk of doing you an injustice, your other comments indicating that the re-election of the coalition will be the end of civilization as we know it does come over as being slightly hysterical, but we wait and see.

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      At least the ALP presented some policies, the Liberals didn’t have the guts to present either policies or Ministers to answer any questions. The ALP made the mistake of thinking Australian voters could understand policy and vote for the good of the country.

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      Your values are not those of a doctor Digby. What is your specialty?
      Doctors are losing more of their Medicare payment and they are worried about keeping some free spots for their less well off patients.
      Hospitals are underfunded. That would concern a medical doctor.
      Doctors care about their patients. My specialist has a heart of gold. He would not think or speak like you do.
      Critical thinking is not the problem, some things you say are!

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    I’m completely over politics in this country. Australians are short term thinkers and only interested in their own self interest. This was the last chance for the environment and it got screwed. The ALP promised to address inequality and paid the electoral price by presenting an honest policy mix to turn back the rorts of the upper crust and promote equality. Australians are just plain stupid to allow this rotten Government another term.

    They are dishonest and simply can’t be trusted. People voted like it was a popularity contest without any thought for the country as a whole. Palmer assisted in Queensland so that Adani will progress and then he and other miners holding licences in the Gallilea Basin can strip mine the place and make themselves into zillionaires while destroying the planet. And yet Queensland farmers whine about the drought! And cyclone and flood damage in the North is to a point where properties are now uninsurable. A real own goal!

    The fact is that the LNP never expected to win so they set up a wedge for the incoming Government with a dud budget promising surplus and tax cuts. Now they have to deal with a disaster of their own making, so watch more cuts to services in schools and hospitals. All the LNP voters reading this site will be affected and they deserve everything they get. Plain dumb!

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      “Australians are just plain stupid to allow this rotten Government another term”.
      Your statement is probably the reason your preferred party did not get elected.

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      “Australians are just plain stupid to allow this rotten Government another term”.
      Your statement is probably the reason your preferred party did not get elected.

  3. 0
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    A day or so since the decision of the people and already carping and ludicrous often ‘expert’ spins everywhere. Regardless of political colour you would think a population’s clear decision could be respected so that their management team can get on with the job they have been put there to do. Even Mr. Shorten as a parting gesture suggested this should be the case.

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      No better time than now to put a shot or two across their bows – lest they get too deep in hubris…

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      Liberals won, Labor lost..this is the democratic way of electing our government. For those who don’t like it you have a chance in 3 years tim

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    A day or so since the decision of the people and already carping and ludicrous often ‘expert’ spins everywhere. Regardless of political colour you would think a population’s clear decision could be respected so that their management team can get on with the job they have been put there to do. Even Mr. Shorten as a parting gesture suggested this should be the case.

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      JAID, well the government has brought and bought that on itself. If in the first few days of not yet even being in government, it is saying it can’t deliver on one of its key promises over which it had total control then we are right to be cynical about their tenure. They didn’t promise much so if they can’t deliver the small crumbs they did promise then we are right to be concerned. The lying that occurred before the election will clearly continue in government; it seems to be an LNP disposition. Personally I would have traded any of the small personal offerings the LNP promised against the long term benefits of protecting the environment and climate change but its looking already that we may get neither.

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      And when the RBA cuts interest rates, then so much for the heroic growth assumptions in the 2019/20 back to black budget.

      Watch this space.

  5. 0
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    I am still feeling the same way, disgusted and disappointed. People have voted on lies and promises that will likely not happen. If you are wealthy you should be happy but if you are on a low income regardless of age you need to reassess your decision to place this government in charge as they will not prioritise your needs or values. One promise has collapsed already which I suspect the government understood already. What else is to come?

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      The sky is likely to fall in Paddington.

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      The sky is likely to fall in Paddington.

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      Well inextratime I hope it falls on the ones who deserve it to!

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      Harsh criticism, Paddington, when you choose to omit the reason for the decision. The parliament has to sit before legislation can be put forward and voted on. This election is still not fully decided and, until it is, the writs cannot be returned.

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      And just think Paddy it would have all been so much worse under a Labor government led by Shorten that by definition would be without values or morals…. and that is what the electorate believed…..Shorten wasn’t even a very good con man….he couldn’t fool the voters. They went for the party with morals and values, and who cares for the Aussie battlers and the forgotten people.

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      Shifty Shorten would have been the death of Australia.

    • 0
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      Paddington, those that voted back this terrible Government may possibly not be around for the next election. The future generations may get a chance then. It’s sad to see young children so worried about their futures thanks to out of control greed.

    • 0
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      Well then Jackie kindly stop worrying the young children with your existence and strange unfounded ideas. Just reassure them they will be OK as long as they don’t vote ALP , or believe their lies.

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      Old Man, which part of “The parliament has to sit before legislation can be put forward and voted on. This election is still not fully decided and, until it is, the writs cannot be returned.” was not understood when Josh Frydenburg clearly told people when to expect their refunds?

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    The picture of the Qld premier as a gun target in the right corner of the front page whilst a big photo of ScoMo on a Qld. newspaper is typical of the scathing attack on Labor and the Greens throughout the election. Hardly any positive reporting happened for Labor and none for the Greens which swayed gullible people. Murdoch influence is abhorrent.

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      Paddington I can’t believe labor is considering Bowen as the opposition leader he came over terribly before the election just an arrogant man, possibly worse then Shorten . If he gets the job you will be in opposition forever

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      I think it has to be three fresh young faces so I agree!

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      Roby, don’t be too sure, after 12-18 months of broken promises and more lies we could be praying for a revolution! The best strategy for Labour would be to elect a moderate right wing clean-skin as leader, clear out the old guard and all the union speak and get real about responsible budgets and spending and talk to the people, not to itself about what is important for the country and vitally its long term future. With only a two or three seat majority, more marginal seats and the possibility of bye-elections in the next three years, nothing is set in concrete. We have seen oppositions and governments ‘written off for generations’ before and for good or bad they spring back more on the failure of the incumbent than the prowess of the opposition.

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      Only in Queensland can this happen. A place of gun worshipping Rednecks and arthritic retirees living in franking credits.

      No wonder they can’t create jobs.

    • 0
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      What about bringing back good ol Richo…..there’s a Labor fellow I liked who actually had a heart and a sense of decency. His TV show is always informative.

    • 0
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      Hi Jackie, Got any more insults that you would like to chuck around just so everyone can feel very assured that the right result was achieved at this election ?

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      Hi Jackie, Got any more insults that you would like to chuck around just so everyone can feel very assured that the right result was achieved at this election ?

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      And dear Jackie those Queenslanders out think you, and outrank you, and are more mindful and clear thinking that you will ever have claim to be. Be grateful for them they have helped save the economy being ruined, in a country in which you live, and are tolerated. Take your ALP how to vote card, and paid up union card, with you to bed tonight, it’s the only thing that will bring you comfort. It must be so unpleasant to be you filled with so much anger, because you didn’t get your way, and the thinking right minded majority disagreed with you.

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      jackie, Samaritans.

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      inextratime, The truth hurts I see.
      Digby, Stick to your lying Government I am so glad I never voted it in. The truth is it’s done very badly during these past six years and won’t improve.

      As long as Labor will stick to its fair values they will get in with Albo for the next election. Hopefully Murdoch will be dead by then. Jerry can’t wait.

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      not much chance of Bowen getting the nod for ALP – too much baggage from this election just gone. I have my doubts they will go for Albo unless they want to risk Morrison going two terms – too left and close to unions.

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      Yes Jackie the LNP has do e so badly in the last 6 years it just got voted back. but I am happy for you to stick with your lying evil party, because the thinking electorate totally disagrees with you. as long as the ALP has people to you supporting it, the chances of the LNP winning ongoing elections into the future are greatly increased. When has Labor ever displayed fair values. And if the electorate laughed at Shorten can you really see them accepting Albo…. even you can’t be that pig headed.

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      Digby says “and the thinking right minded majority disagreed with you”. As a self-proclaimed medical specialist, what is a reasonable estimate of the proportion of retirees not exactly firing on all cylinders? Are they included in your “thinking right minded majority”? In a tight contest it might not be the majority.

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    Labor lost because it tried to introduce too many financial reforms too quickly and also targeted some of them poorly. IMO it had the right ideas just failed on the planned application of them and upset some of it’s own base.
    ScoMo IMO still heads much the same directionless rabble that should have lost and has no ideas about where the country will head. He won by offering more of the same which is not working but was preferable to the many changes Labor offered.
    I think we are stuffed quite frankly and will soon plunge into a recession.

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      I think you’re right, and it is unfortunate most of the Liberal moderates have gone

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      Thank you for a more balanced view. Labor should have lied about their intentions or just watered them down as they were no match for the other mob. Yep, people will live to regret this unless they are wealthy but you never know LNP may have to resort even to that against their own values or lack thereof. LNP lie better I’ll give them that!

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      Paddington, Labor has always been honest. Some people find honesty harsh and prefer lies. Hence a Lieberal Government again.

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      jackie – you could not be more negative if you tried. Why would we vote for a govt who wants to take from the achievers and give to the lay-abouts?

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      Cowboy Jim, You can hardly call Howard’s gift of Franking Credits an achievement. It’s still welfare that is paid for by the tax payer.

      All the cutbacks to services, trickledown effect, tax cuts to the rich have not fixed up the biggest deficit in Australian history. More of the same agin for the next three year won’t too.

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      When has Labor even been honest about anything, … pink bats (some died), unnecessary school halls, “there will never be a carbon tax under the govt I lead….. all lies or incompetence and I think we can safely say at this time the thinking mindful electorate agreed.

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      jackie, a Liebor Gov’t.

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      Cowboy Jim, and there it is, making some people more valuable than others. Who are the achievers and who are the layabouts?
      Our son was shocked today when I told him some of the terms some people on here use to refer to pensioners like ‘leaners’ and ‘bludgers’ and there are others as well.
      He also said he had looked up what the franking credits were about and said that they should be stopped and I suspect this government will do just that. They had looked into it but Labor beat them to it.
      Where will this government go to take their money?

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      Paddy I suspect we may agree on something. I am not yet of pension age and probably will never get it anyway unless I spend everything, thanks to this wonderful country. And my sons of course have very different opinions to yours.. But I do believe the old age pensioners are very hard done by, and the OAP should at least be doubled (why not remove the baby bonus and give it to the pensioners). I do not see the majority of them as leaners or bludgers. In my medical practice, I never charged anyone on the OAP anything out of pocket, and as for veterans, I don’t care how wealthy they were or wren’t, I always made sure they had no out of pocket expenses when seeing me, as because of them and their sacrifices (and the wives and families) I am able to live the life of freedom I do today.

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    The war on Climate Change has been set back at least three years,three years we can’t afford.Have a good look inside your head and think about the kids.

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    There’s not much point in pushing the policies of the Left, the election is over and the people have spoken. Labor lost for a variety of reasons, live with it.

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      You are so right old man. The people have woken to the climate change farce, the cost, loss of jobs and manufacturing etc. We can’t make one iota of difference to the world’s climate as a single entity. Also Labor’s immigration and refugee policy turn a lot of the hardcore off.

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      Yep – my beef was with the increased refugee and immigration intake from doubtful countries. In my mind I saw the boats heading this way again. Bowed would have let them back in like he did under Rudd. The elections are over for another 3 years, so let’s talk about something else.

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      OM…. I wish all here showed your common sense and sound way of thinking.

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      Indeed – OM has not, however, included the added bits about ‘loss of jobs/manufacturing’ etc – all under the LNP watch…

      As a gentleman he merely discussed the basic reality and did not apply propaganda.

      In fact – nobody won this election…. it’s, as usual, a matter of Tweedle-Dumb and Tweedle-Dumber – NONE of them has the answer for this nation, but they are safe for life .

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      Cowboy Jim, The increased immigration intake won’t stop because it’s big business for a Government that does not want to create industries.

      Hence the immigration industry. They pay big money to stay here. They invest in their own small businesses and buy into our property market.

      They spend money and millions more will arrive. Climate Change will coming here soon because of rising sea levels. Enjoy.

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      Digby, I just realised this is another alter ego for you lol….
      Can others guess who Digby is?

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    These inept LNP scumbags have sat on their backsides for the last 6 years. Why would they change now?

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      Knows-a-lot, As long as these puppets pander to the rich and corporations that’s all that matters.

      Australia is no longer a Democracy when the place is run by the rich.

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      jackie – did you see the list of properties the higher ups in Labor admitted to possessing? Was mind blowing, talk about millionaire socialists. I do not have much but I try not to be so envious of other people’s riches.

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      Yes Cowboy Jim -they certainly are the top end of town
      What a bunch of hypocrites
      Use the politics of envy to enrich themselves at the expense of the whole country

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      Cowboy Jim, Shorten married into money and beauty. All politicians receive a healthy salary and benefits. Of course they are ALL well off.

      Look at Pauline Hanson from fish and chips to Millionaire.

      Even Communist China has the most number of Billionaires in the world.

      Labor is not for some but for ALL and the worker. Their taxes keep the economy going not the retired.

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      And the scumbags of the ALP got thrown out by a thinking mindful electorate who considered the needs of Australia rather than themselves. The ALP scumbags have only ever evinced self interest with no concern about , or interest in others. They have got the very least of what they they deserved. leave the government of Australia to the competent adults, not the s incompetent, mendacious, pusillanimity of the ALP. They are Quotidian in their truculence and heinous loathsome malevolent attitude to the ordinary Aussie battler.

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      Sorry jackie, Labor is against “rich” people although they don’t define “rich” and the mythical “top end of town”. Their marriage with the Greens has put mining at risk and this has put them at odds with a lot of blue collar workers. Much has been made of the Queensland factor in the election but if you dig down, a lot of those voters are blue collar workers who want jobs which mining produces. Labor’s ideology with climate change is job destroying which puts them at odds with a lot of people. Labor’s tax policies would have affected all sections of the community badly.

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      Cowboy Jim, did you see the property portfolio that Joe Hockey had before he called ‘an end to the days of entitlement’ and then because he was useless at his job of treasurer and an embarrassment to even the LNP he was awarded a $360,000 a year job in Washington? Of course part of that property portfolio was created by Hockey renting from his wife using tax payer provided allowances. He was so incapable at the new job that when the PM needed Trump’s phone number they had to send a runner to get it from Greg Norman. Hockey proved ‘the end of the days of entitlement’ never arrives for incompetent LNP parasites.

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      And there you have a point about Hockey, who I never had any time for. Thankfully the ALP parasites are even more incompetent, than the rest, and intellectually backward, they only thing they are good at is self interest and lining their own pockets.

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      jackie, Shifty is worth $61 million according to google,where did that come from?

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      Roy, franking credits

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      roy, Shorten married into money. Not only did he marry into money he also married looks. How fortunate is he? Yes a very happy marriage indeed. That creature that accused him of rape just before the election should be ashamed. His wife is a true beauty.

      Abbott had a Royal Commission into Shorten and found nothing.

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