Welfare payments: Dole bludger loophole to close

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According to a Herald Sun report, Newstart Allowance recipients have been exploiting a loophole in the system that allows them to refuse jobs without losing welfare payments.

The current system allows a Newstart Allowance recipient to turn down a job and to continue receiving payments so long as they add a small work-for-the-dole component to their program.

In 2015, 1412 penalties were applied to dole recipients that denied a job with an excuse that was considered unacceptable. Only 378 of the 1412 were actually served with penalties, with the other recipients able to avoid the penalties by exploiting the loophole.

There is currently a bill before the Senate to close this waiver loophole.

“There are loopholes in the system that are allowing some to get away with making insufficient or inadequate job search efforts without good reason,’’ said Employment Minister Michaelia Cash.

“Australia’s income support system is there as a safety net for people who genuinely cannot find a job – not as an option for those who refuse to work. Australians who pay taxes to fund our welfare system expect there to be safeguards to ensure that those who can work do work,” she said.

What do you think? Should welfare recipients have the right to decline a job they feel doesn’t suit them or their circumstances? Or should they simply be happy to have a job?

Read more from www.heraldsun.com.au

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Written by Drew

Starting out as a week of work experience in 2005 while studying his Bachelor of Business at Swinburne University, Drew has never left his post and has been with the company ever since, working on the websites digital needs. Drew has a passion for all things technology which is only rivalled for his love of all things sport (watching, not playing).
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268 Comments

Total Comments: 268
  1. 0
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    First close the ‘loopholes’ for employers paying less than the minimum wage.

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      And maybe close the loopholes for wealthy Australians to launder some of their money with the superannuation rorts. And then ban offshore Tax Havens.
      Whilst I would like to see the rorting ended from both sides of society I have noticed over the years that the well to do side always prevents the party from ending. Such is power and corruption mixed together as politics and who gets what they want.

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      Hear hear from me too

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      Spot on and hear hear from me too.

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      Have to agree with you on that one Mick. Still, this loophole needs to be demolished, abolished, just plain got rid of. It’s ridiculous that someone who supposedly is looking for work can knock jobs back. It shouldn’t matter if they are skilled in work different to that offered, they should have to take the job whether they like it or not but keep looking for the job that suits them if they so wish.
      Something needs to be done too about making skilled welfare recipients relocate to an area where their skills are needed rather than throwing the door open to 457 visa holders.

  2. 0
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    I get annoyed when I see massive protests about something with placard waving protesters occupying outside of a building or in protest marches. How can many of these people be workers? I suspect many are on the dole. Shouldn’t they be out actively looking for work not getting paid when protesting? Maybe Centrelink should suspect their dole payments if they are participating on protest marches but particularly where these blockades and protests extend over days

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      Goodness, what a strange comment. Over years and decades many of the rights of workers have been achieved by protest. Its one of the fundamental rights in a democracy. Women would not have received the vote without selfless women protesting. Likewise if the government had listened to half the country when we got out and protested the Iraq invasion the world would be in a much better place and that has been acknowledged now by those same ex-leaders who led us into that fiasco. Protest is one of the most valuable tools available to ‘ordinary’ pepole. If people who are on the dole have the social conscience to protest in their spare time about what is important to them, good for them. Good for anyone who is passionate enough to try to make a difference. Afterall, one of the best ways to show the government know people have issues is the good old protest!

    • 0
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      I agree completely with sir or is it madam happy cyclist

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      Many workers attend massive protests. I am one of them. Not everyone of us works 9 to 5. The people on NSA may have the time to attend protests but on an income of $489.70 per fortnight that would make it impossible considering they don’t get paid to protest. I am sick of NSA recipients being targeted by this government that doesn’t mind paying its Centrelink CEO a $7M annual salary. Realistically, the only political climate that creates work for all is a Socialist government. Capitalism thrives on poverty that is why work for everyone has never existed in its entire history.

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      I agree with you Dickb, if those protestors were to spend as much time looking for a job then our country would be a lot better off. Why should we pay good money for them to stand around protesting?

    • 0
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      Show me the evidence Dickb

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      Typical comment that I have noticed on so many leftist posts Paulodapotter, How about you try and prove that Dickb’s comments are untrue!?

    • 0
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      You are trotting out the normal government line.
      I don’t see anywhere mentioned in your advertisement about the wealthy having rorts and deductions/loopholes which governments pretend not to see.
      Your comment lacks transparency and THE FACTS.

    • 0
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      Dickb – people who are unemployed can spend hours applying for work, say 30 mins to an hour for each application and if they applied for say 10 jobs per week, they would still have time to do other things. After all, how many job applications will result in an interview? In my experience, about one in thirty!

      When you are not working and living on a restricted income you have lots to keep you busy, including looking for work but there’s no way you could do it all day, every day. It’s just not possible so why shouldn’t you join a protest, go for a walk or a swim if you live near a pool or the beach. I can’t see why you think people on Newstart shouldn’t enjoy life and participate fully in their community, just like anyone else.

      Your comments make you sound like a Nazi – instead of discriminating against Jews or Muslims or blacks, you seem to be advocating that people on the dole should be discriminated against. Even the term “Dole Bludger” is offensive and discriminatory.

    • 0
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      And you Pablo are typical of the right. So you prove that they were on the dole.

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      Good try Queensland Diva, you show me your proof and I’ll show you mine, I am not going to get caught by all your typical leftie tricks!

    • 0
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      Totally agree with happy cyclist

    • 0
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      You might like to consider that for every available job there are hundreds of people looking for work. It is clear that you have no problems; your lack of compassion for those in difficult circumstances is sickening.
      And also, far too many of the available jobs are totally unsuitable for many. You want to apply for a job so far from your home that you couldn’t afford to get there? Or for one that provides you with almost nothing in wages? Or – the list can go on. Your lack of empathy is very nasty.

    • 0
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      Those leftist, radical, protesters, the Knitting Nannas, should be out their applying for jobs rather than protesting about CSG mining.

      These women are clearly just protesting to avoid their obligation to be out there attending job interviews. They abuse dole benefits to pursue a childish, immature whim and disrupt legitimate businesses and inhibit profit generation by multinationals. The government ought do something and close the loopholes and gaol them for a very long time.

      There is a real demand for tea cosies and beanies make by skilled hand knitters so it’s not like the jobs aren’t there.

    • 0
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      Dickb nimble Dickb quick
      Think of the money we have spent
      On the Dole Bludger recipient!
      Oil the wheel that does not squeak.
      I say give more to the sick and weak.

    • 0
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      Jackie
      Surely he does not get $7M salary !

      Did you make a typo?

    • 0
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      MyGasHeater, sarcasm is the lowest form of wit!

    • 0
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      Jackie, anyone who has studied economics knows there has to be a certain level of unemployment for an economy to prosper. If there weren’t any unemployed there would be no incentive for employees to perform to their best ability.
      I believe your claim re hank Jongen’s salary is a huge exageration.

  3. 0
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    I support Michaelia Cash’s “…safety net…not for those who refuse work…” interpretation.

    Just the same, no matter what scheme it is called a ‘work for the dole” component where possible carries pretty obvious benefits, not least in reinforcing the recipient’s confidence in their own capability.

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      The Howard government tried it. It failed. Apparently the dole bludgers who were put on the scheme did not want to turn up and when they did did not want to work.
      I would think that the reaction would have been obvious. Did not happen!

    • 0
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      There is hundreds of thousands of jobs for people who want to work.
      I mean those on the dole have high levels of skills to fill those jobs.

      Who wouldn’t be happy to have that kid who left school last year do brain surgery on them. Brain surgery, it’s not rocket science, just watch a couple of videos on YouTube and Bobs your uncle.

    • 0
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      Said tongue in cheek, I assume, Mygasheater? Those who pay attention to FACTS, know that there are hundreds of thousands more unemployed than there are job opportunities. Every applicant is competing with several hundred others. But the self-opinionated privileged here want to bash the poor unfortunates who keep missing out.

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      Mygasheater, you should have viewed YouTube a bit longer, as it is quite evident that you botched your own DIY cranial capers. You prattle on without any logic on every topic where I see your fratulent name.

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      MyGasHeater, sarcasm is the lowest form of wit!

  4. 0
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    I think the term ‘dole bludger’ used in the article implies that old system the rich have for stigmatising the poor.
    We are not rich, in the unfair system perpetrated on us, we will never be rich or even have enough not to worry!. So why are we playing by their stupid rules that are all about keeping wealth in the hands of a few, therefore profit, and efficiency dividends! Efficiency is a bull**t term meaning that there is no saftey net! No help! No community. According to statistics Gina Rienhardt, personal wealth at 19 Billion, receives government subsidy of 1.7 Billion. Close that loophole first oh conservative government of mine!

    • 0
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      Well said, doclisa. So much emotional BS about a tiny minority who don’t want to work – with accompanying cruelty to the disadvantaged who DO want an opportunity but don’t get one – but we can give billions to the fabulously wealthy, let corporates dodge tax obligations in the mega-millions, grossly overindulge the wealthy with superannuation tax concessions that are disgustingly unfair, and massively overpay inept fat cat CEOs, bureaucrats and politicians.

      But the privileged will always persecute the down-trodden, and make disgustingly dishonest excuses for their abuse, bending the minds of those who can’t think clearly enough to reject lies and propaganda. And the many just plain selfish and greedy self-obsessed who have no idea what it is to suffer major disadvantage will keep condemning and abusing the down-trodden and applauding their persecution.

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      And of course Rainey while quietly rorting the super system, CGT, Negative gearing, “et sic porro” (and so on)

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      Doclisa: the answer to your question as to why we are playing the game which the rich always win – because people are conned by slick advertising and mostly vote Labor or Liberal. That is how the bastards beat us. Honest. Do something different and send them out of politic rather than just out of government. They will soon take notice!

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      Facts please doclisa, Rinehart is worth $11B and her subsidy has never been actually itemised but has always been shown as a part of subsidies to mining companies generally. It should be pointed out that the “subsidies” reported are not exactly that but a return of fuel excise. Fuel excise is charged to help maintain our road systems and as mining companies don’t have their large equipment using the roads, they apply for a refund of the excise.

    • 0
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      doclisa,

      We must distinguish between the “deserving rich” and the “undeserving poor” before handing out very generous taxpayer charity.

      The deserving rich win every time, given billions and millions with no string a attached but make the pittance given to undeserving poor subject to rigid conditions. Where benefits can be remove by a minor bureaucrat at any time, with no right of appeal.

      Yep, that’s fair.

    • 0
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      Old Man,

      When I drive my car in and out of my driveway, a private road, shouldn’t I be entitled to a rebate on the fuel excise?

  5. 0
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    These bludgers should not be allowed, under ANY circumstance, to refuse a job offer. You are right Michaelia Cash, Australians who pay taxes to fund our welfare system expect there to be safeguards to ensure that those who can work do work. The taxpayers of Australia are sick and tired of funding those that bludge on the system. The dole is there to just tide you over until you find a job, NOT for you to bludge it for doing nothing!

    • 0
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      Obviously too privileged to ever understand, Pablo, that 90% of them desperately WANT an opportunity, but refuse work that is totally unsuitable for them or that they cannot perform (due to physical or mental limitations). There are very few ”bludgers”, but once you take an exhausting, soul-destroying job, there are huge limitations on your capacity to look for better. The people you are condemning are mostly heavily disadvantaged folk who have been disenfranchised by a society that lacks compassion and is geared to keeping the disadvantaged down (”in their place”) for the benefit of the privileged. There are very few who enjoy doing nothing, and fewer still who are happy to live on the pathetic amount the dole offers and suffer the stigmatisation of unemployment.

      Get a life, Pablo! You are far too judgmental and cruel.

    • 0
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      Actually Pablo we pay taxes to support all the services that each and every one of us benefit from. The tiny tiny proportion of my tax which goes to welfare for others is also a safety net for me should I too fall on hard times. I agree completely with RAINEY, you are “far too judgmental and cruel”.

    • 0
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      Obviously you are happy for people to rip off the system, so I wish you luck when your welfare payments have been reduced because there just isn’t enough to go around.

      “far too judgemental and cruel” eh! What about if you had a business with a lot of employees and each one of those employees was stealing 1 pen a week! Just think about what happens to the bottom line when people steal from you! This is no different from what I am talking about.

      And … I thought it would be obvious from the way I wrote this that I am not referring to those who are genuinely looking for a job, but it seems I need to spell it out clearly in words of one syllable or less!

      I don’t care what excuses these true bludgers (again, not the ones genuinely looking for a job) give, they should be taken off the dole if they refuse a job offer.

    • 0
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      There’s always demand for one legged Lion Tamers.

    • 0
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      I don’t think anyone likes people rorting the system Pablo. That why we don’t like some of the rich doing so deliberately with the so called tax breaks ripping off the taxpayer much more than the small number of so called bludgers are.

    • 0
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      A few very good comments.
      Whilst it would be pretty unfair to expect a former high flying CEO to accept a job as a toilet cleaner I would think that most people who refuse a job whilst on the dole just want a free ride….whilst being a free agent. As always there should be some common sense used (very short supply in the Public Service) and if the job is not unreasonable then the person should be made to take it or lose benefits.

    • 0
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      Ugly, Pablo! Turn you spleen onto the wealthy bludgers for a while.

    • 0
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      Hey Pablo,

      There’s a slight problem, there are more people unemployed that there are vacant jobs.

    • 0
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      Grow up Aravis and Mygasheater! If you’d read all the comments you would have seen that I believe all of the rorters from BOTH ends of the spectrum should be shut down. And MyGasHeater, you obviously didn’t read what this article is all about – it is to do with PEOPLE APPLYING FOR JOBS or not, as the case maybe. Nothing at all to do with “more people unemployed that there are vacant jobs’ – check it out mate and start all over again with your
      leftie drivel!

    • 0
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      Pablo,

      I have a young nephew who was “breached” (benefits suspended) for six weeks for failing to turn up for a job interview. It didn’t matter that on the way to the interview he was hit by a tram and broke his leg and ended up in hospital.

      Even when Drs certificates were given to Centrelink, his benefits were not reinstated for that period.

    • 0
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      Mick Many are sitting on NSA because they don’t qualify for a DSP but are too sick to work. They seem to only give the DSP to drug addicts/alcoholics and healthy Muslim males with cash in hand jobs theses days

    • 0
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      MyGasHeater, I can make up as many untrue statements as you can! My guess is that he was breached and then you all came up with this ridiculous excuse!

    • 0
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      Pablo, that’s a disgustingly cruel and nasty assumption to make and you have absolutely no basis for making it. Do you know the saying? ASS_U_ME’s make an ASS out of U and ME. And you are showing yourself to be a PRIZE ASS (and a nasty one at that!)

  6. 0
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    Generally speaking, I think people should accept whatever work is available, but there are exceptions where compassion and understanding is merited. Highly intelligent, capable people who have suffered extreme disadvantage can suffer serious mental illness as a result of being forced to work in boring, mind-deadening jobs that offer no future. Our focus on insisting fancy pieces of paper are the ”be all and end all” in job hunt is socially destructive, depriving people of opportunity and the nation of talent. We need to review the way we deal with some – particularly older and experienced people – who lack formal qualifications but have evidenced capability and are now being discriminated against because of age and lack of formal education or training.

    Additionally, jobs are not not always what they seem. I know one unemployed man who took a job in desperation but subsequently quit because the employer was downright abusive and not compliant with health and safety regulations, but despite many, many complaints from employees, somehow this employer continued year after year to get away with appalling treatment of employees – most of whom were desperate for work and willing to suffer quite shockingly-bad conditions, but ended up quitting despite the penalties. Just one example of the abuse – the employer’s wife would stand on the verandah and scream threats and swear at workers if they stopped to wipe perspiration off their brow, to swallow a mouthful of water, or to adjust a load. This was in a stinking hot climate and the work was extremely heavy and physically punishing. Workers were threatened with sacking and a report to Centrelink that they were ”lazy and indolent” and ”deliberate troublemakers”.

    The other factor I think isn’t taken adequately into account is a person’s capacity to assess their own capabilities. When people refuse a job because they know they won’t be able to do it, it’s often hard for outsiders to assess accurately whether the refusal is laziness, unwillingness, or a genuine informed decision that seeks to protect both the employer and other job-seekers from disadvantage and the applicant from intolerable stress and damage to their self-esteem.

    Unemployment is a complex problem that can’t be fairly dealt with through rigid rules or careless judgments. Those who have never experienced severe disadvantage in the job market simply cannot understand how unemployment, under-employment, and unsatisfactory employment can all be thoroughly psychologically devastating, and unsuitable employment can be physically devastating as well as totally soul destroying,

    We should encourage a healthy attitude to the obligation to work and contribute to society, but we should be very wary of judgmental attitudes and ill-conceived notions about something the more fortunate cannot hope to understand.

    It’s sad that any system is going to either hurt good, innocent people who already suffer huge disadvantage, or allow a few lazy folk to get away with bad behaviour. Personally, I’d rather suffer the latter. It will only ever be a small minority and the accompanying cost will be small (though many will quote uninformed anecdotal evidence seeking to prove grounds for their objection to someone getting ”free money”). I’d rather suffer a small imposition on taxpayers than a cruel system that destroys those who face major life challenges.

    • 0
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      Well said Rainey, In addition people forced to work in a job completely unsuitable to them suffering mental and physical anguish eventually become a cost to the state under the health system. This ends up costing the taxpayer more than the pittance of the dole.

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      Yes, Wstaton, or they do as many I know have done. They commit suicide in desperation. And I guess some here would cheer and say ”one less for the taxpayer to support”?

    • 0
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      Rainey, those “Highly intelligent, capable people who have suffered extreme disadvantage can suffer serious mental illness as a result of being forced to work in boring, mind-deadening jobs that offer no future.” Would they feel much the same way if they had increased taxes on their super?
      Personally I think they should face their fears like we poor souls who aren’t highly intelligent. Diversity is the spice of life.

    • 0
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      Frank, they don’t HAVE any super, because they’ve never had a decent break in life. And many of them have faced their fears and tried very hard to overcome their disadvantage. But society continues to kick those who are down, and self-serving egotistical pricks whose only worry is the tax they pay on their fat super endorse kicking the disadvantaged hard. After all, while the government is kicking the downtrodden, they are leaving the self-serving rich pricks alone to enjoy their unfair gain, aren’t they?

      The callous and uncaring here just don’t get that there’s a massive difference between ”bludgers” (of which there are undoubtedly some) and people who want to work, but desperately need a break in life – a break that is more than just an offer of a shit job that will destroy them both physically and psychologically.

      As I’ve said elsewhere, we would do better to stop bashing the victims of society’s failure and start focusing on creating opportunity. There are going to be some 800,000 unemployed and goodness knows how many under-employed no matter what, until we fix some of the underlying economic problems we are struggling with. Bashing the victim won’t change that! Maybe if we abandoned this stupid ”trickle down” theory that has proven an abject failure and started concentrating on healthy social policy and everyone paying their way in society we might actually make progress toward a solution. But my, my! The privileged would NEVER want that, would they? Pay their way? NO WAY!

    • 0
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      Rainey there is enormous opportunity.
      You have been looking in the wrong places.
      If you cant see the opportunity then don’t blame someone else. Learn how to see your opportunities.

      Yes highly intelligent people may not have acquired this skill. If so it’s about time they started to learn. Their lives depend on their own skill sets. Not what the government can do for them. Not what someone else can lay on a plate for them.
      If these people you talk about are your children, then I’m sorry for you.
      I’m sorry that you have not taught them the basic fundamental skill of recognising opportunity.
      I expect you will respond to me with more negativity. 🙁

    • 0
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      Frank, you are full of it. There are more than half a million less vacancies than people wanting jobs, despite people who are only employed one hour a week being classed as ”employed”. There is NOT enormous opportunity, no matter where you look. There is a stuffed economy in which technology has displaced labour and greed has destroyed both incentive and opportunity. And there is NOT much opportunity for a great many to develop skills late in life when they have suffered huge disadvantage in earlier years.

      It’s NOT about wanting anything on a plate. And no, I’m NOT talking about my children – who were all very gainfully employed and making good money until a few years ago when one had to give up work to care for a seriously disabled child (Some call her a ”bludger”, but they wouldn’t know what hard work is!) The others are still making good money. They are lucky. They HAD opportunity and guidance to know how to take advantage of it.

      But it’s time the egotistical privileged stopped their stupid assumptions and took a look at how life really is for the disadvantaged. If we stopped judging people and started trying to understand the challenges they face and address them constructively, we might actually create enough jobs to go around. But no! It’s ever so much easier to bash the victims of social failure than to admit society got it wrong and take the risk that some of the greedy might have to give a little to solve the resulting problems.

      And by the way, nobody knows more than I do about finding or creating opportunity. I went from disadvantaged orphan living in abject poverty with no education to CEO of a public company. So don’t tell me about not seeing opportunity. I know it can be done. I also know how devastatingly hard it is and that not everyone has either the mental capability or the emotional stamina to survive the horrendous climb out of hardship. People whose self-esteem has been totally demolished over and over again, who have no education, no skills, and no guidance or mentors have every cause to be negative. And only a cruel insensitive arsehole would treat them with the contempt and arrogance you display.

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      I don’t believe you Rainey. You sound intelligent enough, but someone with your negative outlook and contempt for others would not have made it to CEO of a Public company. Especially on your own.

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      Frank, I have neither a ”negative outlook” nor ”contempt for others”. What I have is experience in the real world of hardship and deep compassion for and understanding of people who have suffered disadvantage or who face significant challenges that restrict their ability to do what the arrogant and self-opinionated ‘successful’ folk insist everyone SHOULD be doing.

      I’ve seen both sides of the coin. I’ve benefited from extremely hard work and great determination, but I was lucky to have a strong mentor who taught me to believe in myself and never give up, and who gave me the tools to overcome hardship. I had a very long, hard climb and a lot of knocks on the way. And I haven’t made it to where I hoped to be at retirement age (thanks to a lot of dishonest rich people who are quick to condemn ”welfare bludgers” but who cheat, lie and steal without restraint to fill their own coffers!)

      I’ve been very close to a lot of people who haven’t had that good fortune – people who have been trampled on all their life and convinced that they are worthless and useless and not deserving of respect. People who don’t know what it is to be loved and respected. It’s easy to say what those people SHOULD do, but it’s not easy to walk in their shoes and understand just how hard it can be when you have no money, no emotional support, and the voice in your head is telling you you are worthless and useless and it’s no good trying. Add the voice of your neighbour calling you a ”dole bludger” and accusing you of stealing his precious tax dollar, and the voice of the privileged worker telling you what you should have done (that you had no hope of doing due to hardship) and what ”opportunities you are missing”, entirely through your own stupidity or uselessness (as if others would know what opportunities you HAVEN’T been presented with), and I can understand some people just giving up.

      It’s true that we make our life through our choices, but what the self-righteous forget is that some people never have the opportunity to learn how to make good choices. When you suffer abuse, extreme poverty, ill-health, AND the cruel condemnation of the more privileged who THINK you should be able to JUST DO XXXXX, but have no idea how hard it is from where you are standing, you not only can’t make good choices, but you give up wanting to. You just feel as though it’s all hopeless. And yes, some people develop a view that if it’s okay for all these judgmental people to trample on them and make their life a misery, it’s okay for them to take the bastard’s tax dollars and just do their own thing. Tit for tat. Been walked over, bashed, thumped, cursed, ridiculed, bullied, condemned. Why the hell care about the pockets of those who mistreated you or what THEY think you ought to do?

      If society stopped judging and condemning and started trying to understand and help, we might make some progress in resolving the problems the arrogant and self-righteous rant on about. Bullying and condemning will only make it worse. The current prevailing attitude seems to be that we should remove incentives and rewards for battlers and punish the victims of society’s failure to feed the greed of the selfish privileged. Keep the poor down so the rich can keep feeling superior. Well, it will come back to bite. It will NEVER solve the current economic problems, but it WILL create social problems of enormous magnitude. It may well lead, again, to revolution or war. It will likely drive huge increases in crime and health costs.

      I don’t care what you do or don’t believe about me Frank. I am who I am and I’ve done what I’ve done and people can like me or hate me, believe me or call me a liar. I don’t give a shit about people who don’t know me or their uninformed opinions. I don’t even care about those who DO know me and pass judgement. But I will NOT remain silent while judgmental privileged people condemn others they know nothing about and speak in support of attitudes and policies that are cruel and unfair and that destroy people who are deserving of respect and a helping hand and destroy what could be a beautiful and prosperous society if only greed, selfishness and self-righteous arrogance could be stamped out.

      Yes, there are people out there who don’t deserve the taxpayer’s charity. There are people out there who could do better for themselves with a little more effort. But you haven’t walked in their shoes and you don’t know what they are struggling with. It’s so easy to judge, and so hard to understand.

      I will maintain my belief that the best remedy for our economic problems is to stop bashing the victims of social failure and start at the top, accepting responsibility for those who have much much more than they need to give a little for the better good of all. And that DOES NOT mean taking the small rewards battlers who have tried hard but not quite made it to self-sufficient retirement need away from them. It means those who have WAY MORE THAN THEY NEED doing the giving – the people who won’t suffer an ounce of hurt by sacrificing a little.

      Hold out a helping hand instead of stepping on someone and cursing them and you might be amazed at just how quickly their attitude changes. Love and respect are great healers. Calling someone a ”dole bludger” or telling them their income is ”’welfare” and they are therefore second class citizens, or they haven’t achieved well enough to be entitled to enjoy a fair reward for their efforts (so they must give back all they have struggled to earn) is guaranteed to yield the result I suspect the rich secretly want – to make the social problems far worse and the poor into an underclass who have no opportunity and no hope.

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      Rainey, I certainly cannot argue with any of that 🙂
      But why do you insist on standing on the mountain of morality and defending your ground with abuse, insisting that you and only you can understand hardship?
      Your background is not that much different to mine and yet I have no hatred for anyone. Not those who are (confirmed) dole bludgers and not those who pay $60m for a house. I know more about life than you give me credit for and a lot more about human nature than you realise. I certainly know what it’s like to be unloved and lacking in self esteem while not knowing what that meant at the time. I left an abusive home at 14 and found out what it was like to be homeless and unwanted. I had no idea about welfare, I kept to myself and didn’t trust anyone. My schooling may have stopped at 14 but my education continues to this day. When I look back, I am surprised at how successful I became, but then again, I did the jobs others weren’t prepared to do.
      Rainey I think you confuse words of encouragement from others as a lack of compassion.
      If you convince people their lack of success is the fault of others then they will expect others to make it right.
      There are plenty of able bodied able minded unemployed who can be productive if they want to take matters into their own hands. Smothering them with kindness and compassion is not being kind to them. Sure it may make you feel good. I learned this lesson the hard way.
      I’ve lost count of the number of people I’ve helped get on their feet to lead happy, productive, financially successful lives. And yes it cost me a lot of money. I’m not concerned about the money in as much as I paid for the lessons. You see we both have been over compensating because of the path our lives have taken.

      In many cases honesty allows people to know where they stand.
      Welfare is welfare. You can see it as you describe or you can see it as a helping hand for those who really need it from a country which appreciates their contribution? Your choice?
      The fight to hang onto that desire to succeed is a real battle. It’s tough alright as you are well aware.
      What would you rather have? A tough fight which leads to your desired outcome or lack of desire/activity which leads to the outcome of others?

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      Sorry, I don’t agree that ‘welfare is welfare’ Frank. I think society has a debt to those it has seriously disenfranchised, especially when it has done so to the unfair advantage of the more powerful and privileged. And I think society has an obligation to ensure people enjoy a fair reward for their efforts, even if that means that sometimes taxpayers who have been much more fortunate have to stump up a few dollars to enable a system that maintains incentives and rewards.

      Honesty is all very well, but it’s NOT honest to call someone a ”bludger” or a ”cheat” or to say their reasons for doing something are ”facile” without bothering to investigate in detail and consider the very many complex issues that affect a life-changing decision.

      I fought a tough fight, and it brought rewards (for a time. Looks like those rewards are going to be confiscated in the name of GREED and ill-conceived economics). But not everyone is capable of a tough fight – at least not without a great deal of help. It’s too easy to put failure down to ”lack of desire/activity”, but that may be an entirely unfair and cruel judgment of someone who has loads of desire, but just can’t see answers to problems that are overwhelming them.

      People will lead financially successful lives when they are given a degree of freedom, respect, and support to make the RIGHT decision for them – not as a result of being bullied into accepting utterly unacceptable, demoralising and physically and emotionally destructive work offers just to satisfy the demands of a selfish society that lacks compassion and won’t even try to understand people’s private challenges.

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      Just because a person takes a job that isn’t entirely suited to them does not mean they have to stay in that job. There is nothing stopping them pursuing the type of work they are qualified for. Too many refuse jobs simply because they think the job is beneath them.

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      Unfortunately, Gra, that’s not quite accurate. Once someone takes an unsuitable job, it can be a thousand times more difficult to find a suitable position. Tiredness and frustration, shortage of time to look for opportunities, limited ability to take time off to go to interviews, and inability to travel long distances due to work commitments all contribute to making it harder. Then there’s the reality that employers often prefer unemployed applicants, have a loyalty to other employers and don’t want to take their employee away from them, and are suspicious of workers who switch employment and judge them as disloyal, flighty, uncommitted, etc.

      In a perfect world, everyone would take whatever work was available and then seek suitable work once employed, but I know thousands who will tell you from their own experience that it’s nearly impossible once you’ve taken an unsatisfactory job full time or nearly full time to pursue a better opportunity – at least until you’ve been in the unsatisfactory job for more than a year.

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    We live in a country in which welfare is not considered a privilege but a right. This has to change.

    We have a government who wants this to change, but an opposition who relies on welfare recipients for votes. Speaking with those on welfare , through the years, one clear message is common; they vote for the party who will continue to fund their lifestyle, not the one who wants to reduce their benefits and make them contribute.

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      Too true Julian, as I heard one politician say quite a while back, the dole is only there to tide you over until you find a job, not as something to live on forever.

      And yes, these welfare recipients do vote for the ALP/Greens because they know that they can then get away with anything.

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      Now that must be well researched comment, Pablo

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      Well then, prove I’m wrong Paulodapotter!

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      Agree. Far too many unemployed refuse work that is below their dignity. Or does not pay sufficiently more than their welfare payment which they consider their pay.

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      Your are on the money with a part of your post and then the other is a political advertisement. By all means attack Labor….but how about you start on multinationals not paying tax in Australia, offshore Tax Shelters and superannuation rorting by the well off. Not a word about RIGHT WING corruption so that the poor give to the rich.

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      Julian,

      You are right. Far too many people see welfare as a right.

      Corporate welfare is rampant in the form of subsidies, tax breaks, government facilitated profit off shoring to minimise and or avoid paying tax.

      Generous tax breaks on superannuation, negative gearing, rebates on private health insurance, public funding of the top private schools, etc.

      All of the above groups see welfare as a right.

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      Of course welfare is a right for those can’t find work. I tell that to my daughter all the time, but she refuses to accept chartity from the government. It’s a matter of choice and no one should be ashamed of accepting a helping hand and willing to provide one when they can. Get off your high horses.

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    I agree with Pete. First close the ‘loopholes’ for employers paying less than the minimum wage.

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      Right Trevine, no one is smelling of roses on this issue.

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      Trevine,

      Underpaying employees is systematic theft with many facets. Firstly it theft from the employee and it reduces the amount of PAYE tax collected, lower superannuation paid for the employee. In the long term this results in lower retirement income for the employee.

      A lower wage bill reduces payroll tax payable so even less tax revenue collected, etc.

      Employers found to be systematically underpaying employee should be dealt with under criminal law not industrial law. Sentencing these people to five years in gaol would put an end to this form of theft.

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      So MyGasHeater, following your logic means those rorting the welfare system should also be dealt with under criminal law and sentenced to jail!

      I’m sure you’ll have a meaningless comeback, so let’s hear it!

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      It is Pablo. Following the rules is not rorting the system.

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      And, Paulodapotter, the converse is also true – don’t follow the rules and you ARE rorting the system AS I ALREADY SAID! (Even though I have no idea what you comment was about, and you probably don’t either!)

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    I would ask, Do you know just how much the Dole is? And do you think anyone on even the Basic wage, can cope with the gaping difference. Mortgage alone will take much more than unemployment benefits. This is what needs to be fixed.. And I am also disgusted at the HAWKE revitalized Term of Abuse ‘ BLUDGER’ We know where that term might be rightfully used and it’s not for people out of work.. it’s for those at the TOP WHO LIVE OFF THEM.

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    I want to talk about the link at the bottom of this article ‘ inviting to read further’ You may well know that it leads to PAID PRESCRIPTION page. One cannot read further until one hands over money to what can be read for free elsewhere. Anyone who pays for news is a FOOL, you already pay for it in your taxes.

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