Managing the COVID-19 disruption

Australian occupational therapist and Monash University PhD student Lorrae Mynard has released a short and easy-to-read guide to managing the widespread disruption caused by COVID-19.

The guide, Normal life has been disrupted: Managing the disruption caused by COVID-19, explains how productivity, leisure, self-care, space, routines and roles may be affected ,and suggests ways of adapting to and managing these disruptions.

“The current restrictions caused by COVID-19 are dramatically affecting how people live their everyday lives, and many will struggle to respond to the challenge effectively,” Ms Mynard said.

“I wrote the guide to help people calmly consider how they can adapt to this unusual situation.”

It is filled with advice on how to do things such as keeping to a routine, getting exercise, sleeping well and maintaining social connections; any reader should find a helpful takeaway.

“In the few days since publication, we have been overwhelmed by the response, both from members of the public and health professionals. The guide seems to be meeting an urgent need by offering realistic suggestions in this time of crisis,” Ms Mynard said.

Her tips for adjusting to the new ‘normal’ in an uncertain world serves to highlight the important role of occupational therapists.

Australia has more than 22,000 occupational therapists. Many of these registered health professionals work in hospitals, the community sector, aged care and disability services and, as such, are at the coal face of the fight against COVID-19.

“We could not be more grateful or proud of our members, and of all the health professionals working tirelessly to help flatten the curve, keep the community safe, and educate, inform and reassure the community,” said Sam Hunter, chief executive of Occupational Therapy Australia, the leading body for occupational therapists.

The guide has been published on the Occupational Therapy Australia website and is free for the public and health practitioners to download.

For the latest advice, information and resources, go to www.health.gov.au, or call the 24-hour National Coronavirus Helpline on 1800 020 080. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If you require translating or interpreting services, call 131 450. Details of your state or territory public health agency are available at www.health.gov.au/state-territory-contacts.

How have you been managing the disruption caused by COVID-19?

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Preparing for coronavirus lockdown
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Written by Ben

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