Supermarket giants finally getting serious on waste

From this Sunday, you will no longer get a free single-use plastic bag when you shop.

Prepare to kiss plastic bags goodbye

If you shop at Woolworths you would have noticed the difference already, but no matter where you shop, from this Sunday, you will no longer get a free single-use plastic bag when you shop for your groceries, with Coles cutting out the single-use plastic bag on this date. Both of the leading Australian supermarket giants plan to go even further.

"We know that 69 per cent of customers say that we need to actively reduce waste and landfill through recyclable packaging and find alternative uses for waste," Coles managing director John Durkan said.

Coles has pledged to reduce plastic wrapping on fruit and vegies, including bunches of bananas, kale and silverbeet, and replace meat and poultry product packaging with recycled and renewable materials.

It set itself a deadline of 2020 to halve food waste from its supermarkets and make all packaging of its branded products recyclable.

Coles will also donate the equivalent of 100 million meals to people in need by redistributing surplus food.

Meanwhile, rival Woolworths says plastic straws would be banned by the end of this year, while its program to remove plastic wrap from fruit and vegetables will be expanded to include another 80 products.

It's also looking to expand its food waste reduction programs to all stores.

The next step may be following the European Union, which recently outlined plans for a ban on all single-use plastics including straws, cutlery and cotton buds.

Do you support the decision to try and stamp out waste? Could the supermarkets have acted on this quicker? What steps would you like them to implement to see waste reduced?

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    COMMENTS

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    tikiroo
    26th Jun 2018
    10:12am
    So, what do I do now when the single use plastic bags were so handy for the bit-by-bit collection of my rubbish, before I took it to the BigBin ?
    I guess I buy some single use plastic bags to fill this gap ?
    so, -1 and +1 = no change in quantity of used bags ?
    Frank
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2018
    11:07am
    Bin liner sales will go up like they did over in Ireland in 2002, went up 400% and a reduction of 90% of bags bought for 15c. I shall buy bin liners from now on - you get 50 of them on a roll (with handles) for about $1. More of a problem are these styrofoam coffee cups with lids which I find constantly among the bushes in my front garden. Also do away with the small plastic bottles of water they are selling cheaply in 24 packs.
    Supermarkets are winning by making you pack your groceries yourself in your own bags, nothing to do with the environment.
    MICK
    26th Jun 2018
    11:15am
    Agree tikiroo. Same deal.
    Good to see a beginning though unless of course the bags are replaced by other bags and the net result is zip.
    The recyclable bags you can buy at Woolies and Coles also need to be regulated as they are not biodegradable and this is the whole point. We do not need toxic substances sitting in our tips for thousands of years.
    Ginty 01
    26th Jun 2018
    11:18am
    I am going to take my single use bag full of single use bags to the supermarket and reuse them (done it already) before they finally end up as garbage bags, and I have saved 100's of them. How many times will a 15c bag last anyway? Then I am buying the rolls of small bin liners as Cowboy Jim says. And if the checkouts don't like it then just go to the selfserve.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:06pm
    The problem of using plastic bags as bin liners is they do not break down. Why not simply take your rubbish bin to your bigger bin and pour it in then rinse out the bin, not that hard. Other alternative is to buy one of the thicker bags for 15c and use that more than once, rinse it and put it back. What did people do with their rubbish before plastic bags?
    KB
    26th Jun 2018
    4:10pm
    tikiroo use larger garbage bags for the bins. We all need to try and reduce our wastage anyway, I only put the bin out once a fortnight to reduce landfill. Ensure that you are recycling appropriately, I fids that the recycling bin fill up quickly
    AutumnOz
    26th Jun 2018
    10:43am
    Wrap your rubbish in newspaper or those unsolicited flyers from supermarkets re specials. We used to do this many, many years ago and oddly enough the rubbish tins seldom needed scrubbing out, they didn't break either because they were not made from plastic.
    MICK
    26th Jun 2018
    11:33am
    Getting harder due to online media and shrinking/irregular local paper deliveries. Good idea if you can get the newspaper though.
    KSS
    26th Jun 2018
    1:15pm
    I actually have to agree with Mick on this. Newspapers were far more abundant years ago but today even the media themselves is pushing people to the online version. Even my local free newspaper previously printed and delivered 5 days a week, is now only available for two days. The other days are published only online. And even in the two days printed version they keep content back from the printed version thus trying to force readers online.

    Somehow I don't think wrapping your domestic rubbish in an ipad or smartphone will save any bin scrubbing!
    Rosret
    26th Jun 2018
    1:22pm
    They were wrapping newspaper in shrink wrap so I figured it was time to get my news online.
    They need a economic ecological replacement for the plastic bag or the difference is only going to be whether we pay or the supermarket pays for the plastic bag.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:07pm
    Great idea, also you can get butchers paper as an alternative or use a cardboard box.

    26th Jun 2018
    12:03pm
    I think this is a pity. Such plastic bags are handy, and I use them over and over again.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:08pm
    Not a pity for the environment.
    Dallas1955
    27th Jun 2018
    11:22am
    I am sure the whales, dolphins, turtles and other marine life are happy about the ban.
    Ted Wards
    26th Jun 2018
    12:14pm
    Hmm well I had my first home delivery on the weekend from Coles, they have already stopped the use of single use and replaced it with biodegradable bags, but you can elect to use no bags. What that now means is that the drivers are packing your creates which makes them run later and coles can be forced to refund your delivery fee if its not delivered in time slot. So now the drivers are not happy.

    Woolworths have replaced single use with reusable plastic bags which last longer, but will still end up in land fill. They have not even made them biodegradable. So now we can purchase bags for 15 cents each at Coles, fantastic they get to make even more profit. Target tried it and it didnt work. This is all great but the fact is the problem is still there already in the landfill. What they are replacing it with is plastic. So its up to customers to ensure they do not get these new bags and ensure they have reusable cloth ones etc. Demand drives the market but the market drives demand. If they are going to really do this, then they should do it all the way. SO what about all the recyclable packaging that many products some in, the glossy paper used for catalogues and magazines....tip of the ice berg stuff.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:11pm
    Coles will iron out the problems with home delivery, be patient. Are they charging you for this extra service? I don't use Coles for home delivery because they don't deliver here but have used Woolworths are they will be charging an extra dollar for bags or $3.50 for unpacking via the crate, I will be not using the service for awhile until they change this.
    Rae
    2nd Jul 2018
    10:20am
    They could use paper bags for deliveries as they do in the US.
    Sen.Cit.90
    26th Jun 2018
    12:16pm
    The Plastic Bags from my Local IGA carry the advert... 'This Bag is 100% degradable Please re-use This bag'... They are also banned, WHY?
    In my Village, we carry our garbage to a large container some distance from my Unit. It will be most inconvenient now plastic bags are banned. Probably needing to purchase other plastic bags for the purpose.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2018
    1:12pm
    They want you to use paper bags so I hear.
    Rosret
    26th Jun 2018
    1:22pm
    Yep.
    KSS
    26th Jun 2018
    1:24pm
    Goodie Cowboy Jim. Lets cut down trees and render a wide range of wildlife habitat-less instead!
    Anonymous
    1st Jul 2018
    7:52am
    This is what I read:

    “The science shows that moving from plastic to paper is not necessarily 'greener,'” he says. Instead, it may simply shift the environmental impact from decreasing litter to increasin
    g resource use and greenhouse gas emissions. To really go green, he suggests committing to reusable bags, even if made from plastic.

    https://ecomyths.org/2014/05/27/myth-paper-bags-are-greener-than-plastic/
    Rosret
    26th Jun 2018
    1:18pm
    I use plastic straws for craft. I hope the craft shops still keep selling them.
    KSS
    26th Jun 2018
    1:32pm
    There was an article in the weekend's press (and referred to most days since) that compared the so called destructiveness of the mis-named single use plastic bags. For a start rarely does anyone actually use them only once! (think rubbish and dog-poo for a start). Second there is far more environmental damage from the making of the so-called reusable bags than the thinner grey bags. The reusable bags will cause more damage overtime because they will not breakdown as they are not biodegradable either.

    If the supermarkets are going to get anything like serious about reducing plastic and also reducing food waste, I suggest they start with selling less pre-packed food. Currently none of the supermarkets are concerned for 'families' of one or two people. For years they have been pre-packaging foods into ever bigger packs. And of course this is packaging made of several different types of plastic! "Looking at the customer bringing their own container for meat and fish" is really quite ridiculous. What will people bring? Yep - PLASTIC containers which no-doubt the supermarket will helpfully sell you right next to the meat and fish. Just like they are with the new you-beaut PLASTIC bags right next to the check-out!
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:14pm
    Just stop buying plastic wrapped food, go to a butchers, baker and candle stick maker.
    You are better off using a basket or cloth bag than the reuseable bags on offer.
    shirboy
    26th Jun 2018
    2:19pm
    Our oceans are floating garbage. Whales are swallowing plastic bags thinking they are Jellyfish. Dolphins are probably doing same. Plastic straws are creating problems as well. We need to stop the pollution of our seaways so that our descendants can enjoy sea creatures that are healthy & tourist attractive.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:15pm
    Thank you for seeing the bigger picture, some of the people commenting don't see it. It is also poisoning humans when fish eat the micro plastic too.
    The Phonse
    26th Jun 2018
    2:51pm
    COWBOY JIM where can I buy 50 bin liners on a roll for about $1
    Anonymous
    27th Jun 2018
    7:21am
    Try The Reject Shop, Dinki Di's, Dollar Tree etc in your neighborhood. Sometimes they are available in the supermarkets as well. Be prepared to pay a bit more at times like $1.30 or so.
    Priscilla
    26th Jun 2018
    3:24pm
    They were never single use bags! These bags are used over and over again as bin liners, putting wet clothes in going home from the beach and countless others. Replacing these bags with other PLASTIC bags achieves nothing! Except of course the shops make a lot of money charging customers for bags they would have got free before. Shafted again!
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:16pm
    They won't be making money from selling bags, why not use a nylon backpack for your wet clothes.
    KB
    26th Jun 2018
    4:05pm
    Getting rid of plastic bags is a good idea.Anything to help the environment is a good idea I reuse my single bags for lighter items. Will keep on reusing them for shopping until they are no longer usable.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:17pm
    I agree, and once they are not reusable take them back to the Red-cycle bins at the supermarkets.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:25pm
    Yes I am 100% supportive of the decision, and yes they should have acted earlier. People complaining are not seeing the bigger picture, and you need to be creative, going back to the days of no plastic bags and seeing how things were managed. No paper bags are not the answer either because of the damage to more trees being cut down and the water used to process them. Here are some facts, yes they are American facts but Australia would be not much different:

    10 Facts About Single-use Plastic Bags

    1. Americans use 100 billion plastic bags a year, which require 12 million barrels of oil to manufacture.
    2. It only takes about 14 plastic bags for the equivalent of the gas required to drive one mile.
    3. The average American family takes home almost 1,500 plastic shopping bags a year.
    4. According to Waste Management, only 1 percent of plastic bags are returned for recycling. That means that the average family only recycles 15 bags a year; the rest ends up in landfills as litter.
    5. Up to 80 percent of ocean plastic pollution enters the ocean from land.
    6. At least 267 different species have been affected by plastic pollution in the ocean.
    7. 100,000 marine animals are killed by plastic bags annually.
    8. One in three leatherback sea turtles have been found with plastic in their stomachs.
    9. Plastic bags are used for an average of 12 minutes.
    10. It takes 500 (or more) years for a plastic bag to degrade in a landfill. Unfortunately the bags don't break down completely but instead photo-degrade, becoming microplastics that absorb toxins and continue to pollute the environment.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:33pm
    And about Reusable bags::
    Reusable bags do in fact reach their end of life and become trash, however, one reusable bag can hold 2-3 times the amount of product that goes into a single-use plastic bag, and one reusable bag can be used hundreds of times. For every reusable bag, we probably eliminate at least 500 single-use bags, and likely many more. We never find reusable bags in the ocean and shoreline. We have not seen them become a type of litter and a huge part of what we are working towards is to protect and improve the environment. Landfills are indeed safe, but a temporary fix for waste management. While sanitary landfills are great at preventing contamination to the watershed (no air or water exchange), they are essentially mummifying all our waste for future generations to figure out.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    4:37pm
    Here is a link for those who want to educate themselves on the alternatives to plastic bags, also contains the facts about each one:

    https://static1.squarespace.com/static/53c50326e4b0f626fb754be5/t/5441f3eee4b02b47d492f78c/1413608430319/BetterBagGuide2014-PlasticBagFreeNSW.pdf
    SuziJ
    26th Jun 2018
    5:17pm
    I already use bin liners - large ones for my kitchen and medium for my study. The bins in my bedroom, bathroom, car and lounge all use the 'single use' bags. You can always purchase them in box loads to use at home.

    We have a 3 bin system where the council have given us a 'green' bin and encourage us to use it where they provide the bio-degradable liners for the small bins they've given us. This bin is collected weekly and the yellow (recycle) and red (normal) are collected fortnightly.

    I won't ever not have a bin liner in my bins.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    5:51pm
    Wow you must create a lot of rubbish to have all those bins, and why cannot you use the bins without liners? Why not use the sturdy re-useable plastic bags and rinse them out, at least then you won't be using so much plastic bags.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2018
    6:24pm
    musicveg rinsing out your plastic bags, do you pay for your water, it cost more for water then gold where I live, the only winners out of this are the super markets, just read the article in the herald sun and you realise we are again taken by the nose by our so-called green warriors
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    7:19pm
    Green warriors? It is not just about cost, it is about choosing wisely, I was making a suggestion because people insist on keeping the plastic addiction going despite the proven damage that is occurring, if it wasn't for people who cared about the environment we would not have one. I don't read the Herald sun so no idea what spin they are on, who wrote it and who paid for it, I wonder?
    David
    26th Jun 2018
    7:41pm
    Finally Coles and Woolworths in Victoria are getting ride of single-use bags. The other states have already done this, some many years ago.
    I’ve been using recycle bags when shopping for many years.
    Apart from the big reduction in landfill, the ban will also reduce by many millions the number of plastic bags that end up in our oceans, which is great news for the marine life.
    For those that are having difficulty with the change, we all got by up to the 1970s without complaint.
    Aldi has never provided single-use bags and that hasn’t stopped their patronage.
    Musicveg, I fully endorse all your comments.
    musicveg
    26th Jun 2018
    8:25pm
    Thank you for your support, I am passionate about this change and am excited that there is more to come, let's hope other's will understand why it is so important and embrace a cleaner and healthier future for children worldwide. I hope that lobster has not been ingestion micro-plastics David.
    MD
    26th Jun 2018
    8:41pm
    "Do you support the decision to try and stamp out waste? Could the supermarkets have acted on this quicker? What steps would you like them to implement to see waste reduced?"
    Farcical really, remember the big 'kraft' paper bags groceries were packed into ? Their demise came about as the result of "Save the Trees". At the time mankind seemed hell bent on total deforestation and a huge volume of felled timber was ground down to woodchips and dispatched overseas only to return in the form of newsprint, cardboard product and paper packaging. No sooner had the greenies and captains of industry won their respective way and shortly thereafter Oz was being flooded with all things plastic. Of course the bag issue is partly contributory to this problem but I'd suggest it's insignificance in the scheme of all things plastic is not what prompts the retailers to drop them. I recall, whilst working in transport on Sydney wharves in the 80's/90's, transporting container loads of bulka bags, each full of prilled HDPE, most of which would ultimately become singlet bags (or similar) packaging materials. Hundreds, if not thousands of tonnes shipped here during my limited period of involvement. Gotta save the trees - right ? At what cost ? At the time, I cannot recall any mention made relative to how long it takes for a placcy bag to break down. A moot point, but if you're the least bit interested it's worth checking out. Then - when next you look around your own little neck of the woods - plastic: in every aspect and corner of our consuming lives. Our plastic landfill today may have begun to decompose 26 generations down the track. Wouldn't it be great if it could be converted for use in say, eg, power generation. What will most shoppers replace them with ? Ah, of course, those other plastic bags - the ones we tote along whenever we head out to do the weekly shop.
    it's a vicious circle but rest assured, at least some time in the near future we'll probably be housed in either plastic bubble domes or plastic printed structures - made out of recycled (along with similar items) - plastic straws. I'm thinkin the poor ole wolf's gonna huff n puff n ultimately stuff hisself tryin to blow that lot down. Oh can you imagine the lil piggies squeals of delight!
    Hardworker
    27th Jun 2018
    12:18pm
    I'm behind you 100% musicveg. Now that we have created this mess we need to fix it ASAP otherwise we will have a planet that is not worth living on. Instead of whinging about this let's see just how inventive we can be and then spread our ideas on how to get around these issues. I will go back to wrapping the rubbish that cannot be recycled or dug into the garden, in newspaper, as I do have the benefit of a local free paper. Yes its a shame when they have to put the paper in a plastic bag or clingwrap on rainy days but one can only do so much. I have been washing the supermarket fruit and vegetable bags in the washing machine with my towels for years and reuse them over and over. I also think of ways to use less of them. No doubt as we become used to the new way we will think of more and more ideas that will help us all in the long run. So come on guys let's not just throw our hands in the air and give up, because that's just giving up on ourselves. Let's get our thinking caps on instead.
    musicveg
    27th Jun 2018
    2:12pm
    Thanks for your support and great effect. There is a lot we can do to minimize the damage to the planet but we have to get the big guys on board. There is some movement in creating a full cycle where the industries making the goods and then upcycling them check out this link: http://fullcyclebioplastics.com/

    I am challenging myself to reduce my rubbish everyday, I rarely put my rubbish bin out for collection but my re-cycle bin goes out fortnightly, food scraps go to the birds, possum, worms and compost (straight dug into the garden).
    I also try to buy goods in bulk, buying from a shop that you can take your own jars and containers is great if you have access to one, we are lucky we have one in our small town.
    I want the supermarkets to sell bigger bags of stuff instead of 250gm or 500 gm bags it should be 1kg,2kg or 3 kg.
    The Bronze Anzac
    28th Jun 2018
    11:20am
    Supermarkets are the REAL winners from the plastic bag ban. The "old" plastic bags were included in the store's CODB (Cost of doing business) the same as power, wages etc, etc. Now they want us to BUY their reusable bags, & which of course they make a small profit, plus they save by not using the "old" FREE plastic bags anymore. Are we on our way to stop ocean plastic pollution ? The majority of the plastic in the world's oceans come from JUST 5 COUNTRIES: China, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam & Thailand. ALL Asian, & mostly S.E.Asian. Australia contributed less than 0.01 tonnes to ocean plastic pollution. So, who benefits ? Those who used supermarket bags for their kitchen, bathroom, bedroom & other areas, will now need to buy, yes buy, plastic bags at an estimated cost of $78.00 per year. Before the ban,they were FREE from the supermarkets. The Supermarkets WIN.
    Hardworker
    28th Jun 2018
    12:00pm
    The Bronze Anzac you have lost the plot! Excuses, excuses, excuses. It's not about replacing free plastic bags with ones that cost money or who is making money out of it. It's about going back to the old days when we didn't use plastic for everything. If we in the western world set a good example, sooner or later the poorer countries, with the large populations, will follow. Everyone in the whole world will WIN by having a less polluted planet, and we will keep our lovely animals. They won't die a horrible death from ingesting plastic. Think about it. We as human beings are well on our way to dieing the same way eventually if we don't change our ways. Plastic is clean and hygienic but is causing us enormous issues and there are other ways. We just need to think and those of us in the older age group can remember how it was before so much plastic so WE need to show the younger generation (who are quite wasteful) other ways of doing things. Come along for the ride Bronze Anzac and you will be doing your bit.
    musicveg
    28th Jun 2018
    1:14pm
    The Bronze Anzac, please read my posts and see the links for alternatives to using plastic bags.
    Also the supermarkets are donating some money to charity from the sale of the plastic shopping bags you have a choice to buy. Those who cannot afford to spend money on buying plastic bags should just not buy them and use alternatives. People have become too reliant on plastic bags and I am surprised that many people on this site are complaining when some of them grew up without plastic bags and know all the alternatives.
    There are reasons that Asian countries may contribute more to pollution and it has a lot to to with the population so you should not compare and use this as an excuse. We need to keep Australian waters free of plastic and lead the way to a cleaner future.
    Also it is not just animals and marine life who are suffering from the pollution it is humans too who consume fish, no marine animal is free of plastic anymore. Do you not care about the future of the children of today?
    Great comments Hardworker.
    David
    28th Jun 2018
    10:27pm
    The Bronze Anzac, even if the supermarkets were going to make money from selling the reusable bags (which they are not for the reasons that Hardworker and Musicveg have pointed out), if you just keep reusing your bags time and time again, there will be no benefit or gain to the supermarkets.
    Years ago before plastic bags were available, we got by without them. If you could get by without plastic bags back then, why can't you do the same now?
    I think there are too many people now that think of themselves and "What's in it for me?" without thinking or caring of the impact on others (including other people, future people, animals and marine life).
    I appreciate your comments Hardworker and Musicveg.
    musicveg
    28th Jun 2018
    10:30pm
    Thanks David, yes far too many people only think of selfish reasons for many things, and that is why the world is in such a mess in more ways than one. Time the human race stepped up and got their act together, to repair, rejuvenate and make this world a safer, kinder, cleaner, and fairer world for all.
    GregE
    29th Jun 2018
    2:44pm
    The Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the UK has warned that deadly bugs such as E coli and campylobacter, which can cause stomach bugs, can be transferred from the outside of packaging when plastic bags are reused – even when there is no obvious trace of leakage. When I was growing up we had paper carrier bags which would now be decried as killing the forests, I recently asked a supermarket in
    Vic (they are eliminating "single use" bags in a few days) if cardboard boxes would be available, they said no, they have to be flattened for recycling. This leaves us with having to source washable cloth bags and possibly needing to soak them in nappisan or similar sterilizing solution and we'd need to buy something to wrap the non compostable food and other scraps (we have no rubbish collection in our area). Also in the old days we could get fruit in wooden boxes which were both reusable and able to be re-purposed (eg bookcases, shelves etc) but that has stopped due to both economics and restrictive legislation (you can't take boxes that once contained fruit through a fruit checkpoint in Australia) so the "go back to the old ways" mantra isn't practical. Just my 2 cents worth!
    musicveg
    29th Jun 2018
    4:20pm
    Good points GregE, though I think that any packaging can contain bugs whether washed or not. You don't need to soak your cloth bags in chemicals just in eucalyptus oil, only need a few drops and let the sunshine do the rest. You will pick up more bugs from door handles in public places than anything else.
    What food is non compostable?
    Also there is an option to use compostable plastic bags, they break down in the environment much quicker. See my posts and links or other options.
    Hardworker
    29th Jun 2018
    8:01am
    Plastic bags are just the beginning. There are a lot of practices and things that we do that we need to change in order to keep this planet livable for not only ourselves but future generations. At the moment we enjoy a variety of animals which make our lives interesting and enjoyable, but the numbers are shrinking because of us. If you want to be selfish and self-centered then do that. Think of yourself and help fix this for yourself. Start watching documentaries and the like and you will see how countries like Japan are at least trying to do something about it. The solutions are not perfect yet but that will come with practice. Every country should be handling their own waste no matter what it is, sewerage, food scraps, plastic, no matter what. We are already in a mess and because of increasing populations this should be top priority. Not just to send it off to China or some other poor country to deal with. Let's stop whining about inconvenience and retrain our brains, otherwise guess what! - a miserable future for all of us. Being part of the solution gives us a better outlook on life and makes us appreciate what we've got.
    David
    29th Jun 2018
    8:13am
    I agree Hardworker.
    China refusing to no longer take our waste is a wake up call for us to make better decisions on the plastic products that are produced and to transition to more sustainable products.
    Some great docos on these issues are 'A plastic ocean' and the ABCs 'War on waste' series.
    David
    29th Jun 2018
    10:56am
    Here are some of the reasons why single use plastic bags are being banned:
    1. Close to half a million single-use plastic bags end up in Australian landfill EVERY HOUR.
    2. A staggering 13 million plastic bags are used across the country daily. And, each year, 50 million plastic bags – approximately two for each member of our population – end up in Australia’s waterways.
    3. Plastic bags take between 400 and 1000 years to break down.
    4. There is strong scientific evidence pointing to the significant impact plastic bags present to the environment, including risks to marine life and pollution of our waterways.
    5. Being non-biodegradable, the bags just become smaller and smaller toxic pieces of plastic which often lead to ingestion by animals low on the food chain.
    6. The flow-on effect can also be deadly for larger mammals. Earlier this year a sperm whale was found washed up on a Spanish beach with almost 30 kilograms of rubbish, including plastic bags, blocking its digestive system.
    musicveg
    29th Jun 2018
    2:28pm
    Thanks for posting the facts, though it does not seem to matter to most people. I try also to tell people that humans are ingesting plastic, pollution and chemicals that are contributing to the rise of disease especially among children.
    I watch a lot of doco's too. The solutions are happening but our media only wants to talk about the bad stuff instead of the good stuff that is happening in the world. You can find a lot online but it takes time. One Planet.org is a good place to go.
    musicveg
    29th Jun 2018
    2:31pm
    Sorry it is actually One Green Planet.org, though One Planet is interesting too.
    musicveg
    2nd Jul 2018
    6:59pm
    Just found this great article that explains plastic a bit more, including biodegradable, degradable and home compostable. Interesting to not that the Multix Greener degradable bags only break down into smaller pieces and is not helpful for the environment:

    https://www.choice.com.au/shopping/packaging-labelling-and-advertising/packaging/articles/biodegradable-plastic


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