1st Sep 2017

Banking customers urged not to fall for convincing new scam

FONT SIZE: A+ A-
Leon Della Bosca

Customers are being warned of a fake bank scam that advises Australians of ‘unsuccessful payments’, then prompts them to login to accounts where scammers steal important personal information.

Cyber security firm MailGuard says the scam is very convincing and has been sent to thousands of inboxes.

“The email, from a display name of ANZ internet Banking and sender email address of customer.data@anz.com, claims that ANZ have been unable to contact you, and asks customers to click to update their phone number,” warns MailGuard.

“When recipients click through they arrive on a well-crafted ANZ internet Banking landing page where they are prompted to login, so doing handing over their Customer Registration Number (CRN) and Password.



“For those that continue past the internet Banking login page, the scammers try for even more sensitive data by asking recipients to divulge the answers to three ‘security questions’.”

Customers are advised to check for grammatical errors and to check the domain to which the email links, which in this case is https://djarlo.net/anz. If any of these red flags appear, you should delete the email immediately.

If you think you have fallen for this scam, contact the ANZ helpdesk immediately to have your account details changed or to check for suspicious account activity.

Related articles:
Scam puts smartphone users at risk
NBN scam targeting older Australians
Inside a scammer's bag of tricks





COMMENTS

To make a comment, please register or login
billy boy
1st Sep 2017
11:54am
find their ip address, through apps, will tell you how, illegit, they are, then report the ip address ;)
Rosret
1st Sep 2017
1:35pm
Its a very clever scam - quite professional and even the more astute could get caught out.
Old Geezer
1st Sep 2017
2:06pm
Avoid using their links to log in as they will direct you to their page pick your details and then log you in. It is quite simple programming and is used by many sites to keep you logged in.
KSS
1st Sep 2017
2:23pm
How many times do people have to be told that banks and other financial institutions never ask for personal information in emails?

If you get one delete it. But if you think there could be some truth in it, delete it and contact you bank by phone, go into a branch or even close down you computer restart and go to your online bank in the usual way. It's not that hard.
Radish
2nd Sep 2017
1:17pm
Totally agree!~
Radish
2nd Sep 2017
1:16pm
All you need to remember is none of these organisations contact you in this way.
Use your commonsense people and if in any doubt just go in or ring the bank....for the life of me I just cannot understand people being taken in by this.

I have these spam emails arrive in my inbox quite often and delete without even opening.

Oh well, if people keep getting scammed even after being told again and again via media; sorry it is their own fault.
johnp
3rd Sep 2017
8:33am
Trouble is too and an example is ANZ when speaking with their call centre the employee asks for some info but doesnt ask for sufficient I.D. Info like address. Instead they read that info to you, when they have that on the screen in front of them. How amazing is that ??
Radish
4th Sep 2017
4:50pm
Latest scam. Got this phone call today.

Recorded Aussie female voice:

"Congratulations you have won a travel voucher worth $900 from Qantas. All you have to do to collect it is to select 1".

All I did was hang up!! Checked it out, yep is a scam. Once you hit the 1 you are then told that they need your credit card number to enable you to get the voucher...oh yeah....now what idiot would fall for that trick?....plenty have apparently. The only answer I can give for them falling for this is pure GREED! There is no such thing as a free lunch these days!


Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

  • Receive our daily enewsletter
  • Enter competitions
  • Comment on articles

you might also be interested in...

How to manage nuisance calls

Discover how to identify a caller and, if they’re a nuisance, prevent them from calling again.

Can you leave your computer on?

Do you have to switch off your computer at night?

How to clear your browser history

Problems browsing? Here’s how to clear your history and cache, and restart with a clean slate.

Do you still need a landline?

Do you really need to keep your landline?

How to spot a fake email

Drew explains how you can protect yourself from email scams.