Australians with a home phone connected are in the minority

Looking at long-term trends for the technologies Australians use.

Australians with a home phone connected are in the minority

In 2001, over 96 per cent of Australians had a home phone connection. This has halved over the past two decades as new technologies, including mobile phones, broadband internet and subscription TV have made increasing inroads into Australian households.

The changing way Australians consume their media is starkly illustrated when looking at long-term trends for the technologies Australians use.

Over the course of the past year, the proportion of Australians with access to subscription/pay TV services at home has increased to 66.5 per cent, up 4.9 percentage points from a year ago (61.6 per cent in June 2018), and up a whopping 37.4 percentage points over the past four years since June 2015 (29.1 per cent).

Driving the increase has been the huge take-up of subscription TV or subscription video on demand (SVOD) services now that Netflix is accessible to around 11.5 million Australians.

In total, 57.1 per cent of Australians now have access to SVOD services including Netflix as well as rivals such as Stan, Amazon Prime, YouTube Premium and others.

Just four years ago, less than two per cent of Australians had SVOD.

The incredibly fast take-up of these new technologies, and the almost ubiquitous usage of mobile phones now used by 95.9 per cent of Australians, has accelerated the decline in the proportion of Australians that have a home phone connected.

Now less than half the population have a home phone connected (48.6 per cent), down 9.5 percentage points from a year ago.

These findings from the Roy Morgan Single Source survey are derived from in-depth face-to-face personal interviews with over 50,000 Australians each year in their homes.

Roy Morgan chief executive Michele Levine says that the exceptionally fast take-up of subscription TV in the past few years is attracting a field of competitors keen to grab a piece of the action.

“The stunning rise in subscription TV in recent years remarkably means that more Australians now have household access to the likes of Netflix, Stan and their rivals than a home phone connection,” Ms Levine said.

“Not too long ago (early in the 21st Century for example) a home phone connection was regarded as all but ubiquitous and over 95 per cent of Australians had one at home.”

Do you still have a landline connected at your home? Have you considered getting rid of it to save money?

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    COMMENTS

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    Buggsie
    1st Oct 2019
    10:38am
    Got rid of the home phone 6 months ago due to persistent nuisance calls etc. Haven't missed it at all. Shocked a few of our friends of similar age. The mobile works well and I have an unlimited plan that is inexpensive and reliable (not Telstra!).
    AutumnOz
    1st Oct 2019
    11:15am
    The almost ubiquitous usage of mobile phones only happens where there is reliable mobile phone coverage which is mainly in the cities.
    If the NBN ever arrives at our home it will be by either wireless or satellite which means our home phone will still be a landline as there is no mobile coverage where we live.
    Also don't forget the NBN company is not required to ensure that there is always electricity available during blackouts. When people using the NBN phone service lose not only their computer use but also their home phone, they need good mobile coverage to report they have no power.
    Greg
    1st Oct 2019
    12:24pm
    My provider TPG install a back-up battery for the phone, it's a mandatory item with TPG.
    The Care Bear.
    1st Oct 2019
    5:23pm
    Not mandatory, I'm with TPG, have been for many years.
    Tanker
    1st Oct 2019
    11:22am
    We still have a landline phone simply because our plan allows us to have one at no extra cost. My mobile plan, at a modest cost, gives me unlimited calls to any landline and mobile in Australia plus 10 countries overseas. I have good mobile coverage and should I ever have to pay for the landline it will go to the scrapheap.
    GiGi
    1st Oct 2019
    12:16pm
    Same applies to us. Anyway, we make hardly any use of our mobile phones. Our mobile 'plan' is to visit Woolies once a year, and buy a $70 voucher (which lasts a year and come with something like 150 free minutes). Why would we want any more 'connectedness' than that? Have no wish to spend my life staring at my hand!!
    dorothy
    1st Oct 2019
    3:27pm
    same here i have $40.00 a year if i use it i can top up and if i dont i can roll over ,like you i have no desire to stare at my hand
    dorothy
    1st Oct 2019
    3:27pm
    same here i have $40.00 a year if i use it i can top up and if i dont i can roll over ,like you i have no desire to stare at my hand
    Tood
    1st Oct 2019
    4:33pm
    Same, same Gigi, landline so reliable, no having to recharge those pesky mobiles every few days, only used rarely, $15 recharge can last a year. I too have better things to do with my hands.
    Charlie
    1st Oct 2019
    11:25am
    Driving the increase in pay TV is the poor quality free to air TV, with viewing time strangled by advertising.

    Home phones have been put thru the NBN modem so you need to have a mobile anyway in case the internet goes down.. You can't phone and say "why is the internet down"

    Scammers have weekly attacks on my home phone, sometimes several attempts. I am moving to a different address so I will have a different number.
    Also telstra have offered me a private number without charge. Don't know why, pension or part of my plan ? It was always a pay extra service
    Greg
    1st Oct 2019
    12:28pm
    TPG insists on a battery back-up system for their internet.

    We moved to a new home, new phone number two years ago and have not had ONE phone call, no scammers, so when you get a new number hopefully you'll be good too for a while.
    The Care Bear.
    1st Oct 2019
    5:26pm
    Not mandatory, I'm with TPG, have been for many years.
    Dave R
    1st Oct 2019
    11:48am
    I will have a landline for ever as our NBN is delivered over it. Fixed phone, internet 50/20 speed with unlimited data and mobile phones are all on one package with Telstra which brings a discount, free calls in Australia and to some (20) overseas countries plus a few freebies like a Stan subscription thrown in.
    Priscilla
    1st Oct 2019
    11:53am
    I still have a landline. Most of my family and friends have a landling. Doctors and most businesses have landlines. When my internet and mobile phone don't work, my landline does! I can hear better on my landline.
    Sundays
    1st Oct 2019
    12:00pm
    Still have a Lanline but it’s no extra cost in our plan. My husband is a bit deaf and he hears better on it. The phone and internet connection were down for a few days, so mobile was good to have. Unfortunately, you can’t contact NBN direct but have to work through your provider which adds to the delay in getting a technician to come out.
    Dave R
    1st Oct 2019
    12:02pm
    And another good thing about landlines is that you can run a cordless phone from them. We have four phones scattered around our house which both helps us hear them ring and get to them before the caller hangs up.
    Greg
    1st Oct 2019
    12:31pm
    We have a landline but only as it comes with the NBN through TPG, we NEVER use it, I wouldn't know the umber without looking it up. Always use the mobiles $30 each per month, 25GB of data, they get a workout.
    tisme
    1st Oct 2019
    12:32pm
    we still have a landline its easier for the family , what would i replace it will I look around and stunned by all the phones need on in the house
    dabs
    1st Oct 2019
    12:37pm
    Still have a landline (through NBN) and I'm loathe to lose it. Why? TC Yasi in 2011 I was newly home after open heart surgery and when the power went out Ggen Y used up the emergency power to download movies. I need a backup against mindless idiots.
    rtrish
    1st Oct 2019
    2:07pm
    ! Good heavens! Or words to that effect. Glad you made it through OK.
    V1K1
    1st Oct 2019
    12:47pm
    Those of us with a serious medical condition appreciate the security of a landline.
    rtrish
    1st Oct 2019
    2:09pm
    Agreed.
    rtrish
    1st Oct 2019
    2:06pm
    I still have the landline, the NBN is connected to it. I suppose I could get rid of it and reply on the mobile, but I have a very cheap rate using the phone. Also, I am getting hard of hearing and the landline is easier to hear than the mobile, though the nuisance calls are, just that, a nuisance. I have Priority Assist on the landline; don’t know if that applies to the mobile.
    dorothy
    1st Oct 2019
    3:23pm
    once nbn is connected to the house most of telstra client are not able to use their home phone ,i am with optus so mine still works ,i get lots of pesty calls on it ,but only want to use my mobile for emergency calls or to and from family ,so only answer calls on my home phone if the people are in my phone contacts ,i do not want people calling me for chats on my mobile when i am the supermarket etc
    Tood
    1st Oct 2019
    4:29pm
    I'm on the NBN and with Telstra and my landline works fine, I let all calls go to message bank so no talking to pesky callers and I can even hear the message bank as its recording a message.
    dorothy
    1st Oct 2019
    3:23pm
    once nbn is connected to the house most of telstra client are not able to use their home phone ,i am with optus so mine still works ,i get lots of pesty calls on it ,but only want to use my mobile for emergency calls or to and from family ,so only answer calls on my home phone if the people are in my phone contacts ,i do not want people calling me for chats on my mobile when i am the supermarket etc
    patti
    1st Oct 2019
    3:53pm
    I do have a landline at my home. I would love nothing more than to get rid of it, and avoid all those annoying telemarketers. However, because I have no mobile signal in my bedroom, and I have a heart condition, the landline could be my only way of calling an ambulance in the wee small hours. After some hassles, Telstra have installed a modem with battery backup for my NBN and landline, so hopefully during a black out I can still make calls if I need to. It did take quite a while to organise. Luckily I had no heart episodes during that time!!

    6th Oct 2019
    8:56am
    Like the landline as it allows me to listen to radio stations of my choice all day if I chose to, cannot do that on mobiles. Do not live in a city and do not have too many radio choices on common radios.
    Circum
    11th Nov 2019
    9:42pm
    I still have a landline which serves me fine.Calls cheaper than mobile phones and no need for subsciption tv.sit back and relax watching free to air..cheers
    Circum
    11th Nov 2019
    9:42pm
    I still have a landline which serves me fine.Calls cheaper than mobile phones and no need for subsciption tv.sit back and relax watching free to air..cheers


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