The number of Aussies who fear flying is higher than you think

A survey of 1000 travellers has revealed how many Australians fear flying.

Why do Australians fear flying?

A survey of 1000 travellers who have flown in the past year has revealed how many Australians fear flying – and the number is probably higher than you’d think.

Nearly two in five (37 per cent) Australians have aviophobia – a dreadful fear of flying. The survey revealed that the younger the traveller, the more likely they are to fear flying, with 17 per cent of under-30s declaring a fear, followed by 17 per cent of 30-somethings, nine per cent of 40-49 year olds, six per cent of those aged 50-59 and only four per cent of over 60s. The fear was most felt during take-off and landings, and in turbulence.

In 2018, there was one fatal accident per 2.52 million flights. However, despite this staggering statistic, Aussies’ fear of flying is steadily increasing. Nearly three in five (56 per cent) aviophobes say their fear of flying had increased over the past five years.

According to the study, media reports of plane crashes have contributed to this heightened fear, and the younger generations are most influenced by the media. More than half (56 per cent) of under-30s said such news affected them compared to just 34 per cent and 27 per cent of 50-somethings and over 70s, respectively.

“While the findings reveal a large proportion of Aussies, particularly young people, fear flying, flight-related accidents are a rare occurrence,” said InsureandGo spokesperson Jonathan Etkind.

“When accidents do occur, however, they are widely reported and gain a great deal of media attention, which can contribute to travellers’ heightened fear.

“Instead, travellers should be warier of on-ground incidents that are more likely to happen, such as overseas medical expenses, theft and lost luggage.

“Since travel always has some element of risk, it’s essential that travellers purchase an appropriate level of travel insurance cover.” 

Are you afraid of flying?

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    COMMENTS

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    SuziJ
    4th Jul 2019
    10:31am
    I first flew in 1970 from Griffith NSW to Sydney in a Fokker Friendship. It was sooo rough that I vowed never to fly again!

    I wasn't until late 1994 that I took my next flights - from Canberra - Sydney and return until the last week of my training when I took the last day off and took the Xplorer train home. The last Sydney flight was so rough that I 'froze' and wasn't able to move from my seat. I vowed not to fly again (domestically, anyway).

    I'd never been overseas until 2013 when I bit the bullet and took control of the planning of our UK/Ireland trip. It was a 'breeze'. Even though I had butterflies in my stomach, I was going somewhere I never even dreamed I would be able to get to due to my fear of flying.

    I had researched the trip to the last detail. There were a couple of 'hitches' but they were dealt with immediately and didn't affect the enjoyment of the trip. I'd love to see more and the next trip will be as long as the first one - 12 weeks :)

    I've now dealt with my fear of flying, but it's not my preferred method of travelling.
    Charlie
    4th Jul 2019
    9:54pm
    I remember the Fokker Friendship, but cant remember if I went on one. A Fokker Friendship crashed off the Queensland coast, say 1950's and was reported to be one of Australias worst air disasters.

    The Dash 8 would have been similar. I flew on that more recently. My favorite aircraft on the small regional airlines was the Beechcraft 1900 D series. It felt quite powerful for its small size and climbed out of Sydney airport fairly quick to reach its cruising altitude without getting buffeted around so much.
    Hardworker
    4th Jul 2019
    12:32pm
    I love to travel and the modern bigger planes are very smooth and comfortable if you can afford Premium Economy or Business Class. But I have just read ex Qantas pilot Kevin Sullivan's book "No Man's Land - The Untold Story of Automation on QF72". I like to be informed and to read about real things not fantasy. The future of automation on this planet is very scary, not only in planes but in automobiles as well and even as a pedestrian exposed to these vehicles. I know we take risks just living life but I question whether the risks are getting worse not better. If this is the way the world is going then I think we need a lot more consultation with the operators in the designing and manufacturing stages. The book, $22 at Target - although scary, a really good read.
    Tanker
    4th Jul 2019
    2:45pm
    I agree about this drive to computer control of all sorts of vehicles including aircraft. If highly trained pilots can end up being unable to control their aircraft because of what the computer(s) are doing what hope would your average driver, who is to be honest very poorly trained, going to do in an emergency?
    Triss
    4th Jul 2019
    12:38pm
    I’m surprised it’s the young who are scared of flying, that’s when we didn’t used to worry. In the 50s comets used to drop out of the sky fairly regularly but it didn’t seem to put us off flying.
    Charlie
    4th Jul 2019
    12:49pm
    No fear of flying but a long way from a positive attitude. I go on board and think "well this could be the last flight I ever take."

    The type of aircraft and flying weather play a big part. I am a little intimidated by long narrow wings that bend so much you can see ripples in the metal. Also loud undercarriage clunks and sudden drops in altitude. I always liked Douglas DC 9 with twin jet engine at the tail and Beech craft twin engine turbo prop.
    hyacinth
    4th Jul 2019
    4:32pm
    Well we came to Australia on a ship via South Africa because of my fear of flying. Since then I have travelled to the UK , flown around the world . two trips to the States and several times from the west coast to the east coast. Some trips have been smooth others rather bumpy but it really is the only way to get from A to B in a comparatively short time. Towards the end of the year I shall be flying for the first time on an Airbus 380-800 from Singapore to the UK and have decided to fork out and go business class probably because it is likely to be my last long trip overseas . I have to admit I always say a prayer before flying. I am in awe of this aircraft because of its size . There is a program on how the wings are made in North Wales in a village just two miles from my home village. Each wing weighs 35 tons and is 45m long and at the widest part 12m. What a size!! A special barge has been made to take each wing separately up the River Dee to Mostyn where it is then transferred to a special boat that delivers the wing to France for assembly on the aircraft's body . Knowing that the wings are made in Broughton gives me some extra confidence !!!
    SuziJ
    31st Aug 2019
    10:34am
    Hyacinth, enjoy your trip. Which airline are you flying with?
    hyacinth
    4th Jul 2019
    4:32pm
    Well we came to Australia on a ship via South Africa because of my fear of flying. Since then I have travelled to the UK , flown around the world . two trips to the States and several times from the west coast to the east coast. Some trips have been smooth others rather bumpy but it really is the only way to get from A to B in a comparatively short time. Towards the end of the year I shall be flying for the first time on an Airbus 380-800 from Singapore to the UK and have decided to fork out and go business class probably because it is likely to be my last long trip overseas . I have to admit I always say a prayer before flying. I am in awe of this aircraft because of its size . There is a program on how the wings are made in North Wales in a village just two miles from my home village. Each wing weighs 35 tons and is 45m long and at the widest part 12m. What a size!! A special barge has been made to take each wing separately up the River Dee to Mostyn where it is then transferred to a special boat that delivers the wing to France for assembly on the aircraft's body . Knowing that the wings are made in Broughton gives me some extra confidence !!!
    Aggle
    4th Jul 2019
    6:49pm
    Flying is safer nowadays than it has ever been. Young people probably are more fearful of flying because of over protective parents ( helicopter parents ! ) not letting them take any risks when they were little.
    The wolf
    4th Jul 2019
    8:39pm
    When young I did not care a hoot and flew here there and everywhere, helicopters , sometime flew 2/3 times a week on plane. Now the thought scare me and I have to use logic to persuade myself to board a plane then I am ok till it start to be affected by turbulence and then I swear at myself for being on this f.......n plane. Sometime I am lucky and sleep. Not flown for 4 years
    Rosret
    5th Jul 2019
    7:34am
    A relative by marriage flew bi-planes in world war I. They only flew when the weather was calm in the early hours of the morning and learnt French and German during the day. After the war he never flew again until my father convinced him to take a flight on a passenger in the 1970s as an old man. He was amazed!
    I think I had more confidence when I was younger than I do now. The IT crowd are getting too cocky with their automation. That means pilots on some airlines are being trained to a lesser degree. Then our carriers are having their planes serviced overseas and we all know from "ground wear" how unreliable our new basic items like the fridge, stove, washing machines etc are becoming. The planes, I trust are being well built and tested however the more ground staff they take away, the more tacky our airports are looking, the more I wonder where else they are under staffing.
    Statistics tell me they are much safer these days. So I go with the odds against dueling a semi on the Hume or flying though a few turbulent clouds.
    hyacinth
    31st Aug 2019
    12:03pm
    Thank you SuziJ Singapore Airliness
    hyacinth
    31st Aug 2019
    12:03pm
    Thank you SuziJ Singapore Airliness


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