Government pledges $15 million to protect older Australians

The Government makes a $15 million election pledge to protect older Australians.

Government pledges $15 million to protect older Australians

The Turnbull Government has pledged $15 million towards protecting the rights of older Australians and safeguarding them from elder abuse.

Senator George Brandis used International Day of Older Persons, which was yesterday, to announce the Government’s $15 million election promise.

The plan includes a new peak body and the development of an online resource aimed at raising awareness and providing training materials to help older Australians from the often unspoken issues facing them today, including elder abuse and other forms of ageism.

"The abuse of older Australians can take many forms, including financial, physical, emotional and sexual," said Senator Brandis.

"For far too long, older Australians have had these actions diminish their ability to enjoy their lives with dignity and this has too often occurred in silence."

A seniors' advocacy group is also calling on the government to make greater use of older Australians to help lift economic growth, reduce health care costs and improve social well-being.

Labor also spoke out about the invaluable role older people play in society, but is worried that many could be living better.

"The ability of our ageing population to participate, contribute and thrive in Australia is largely dependent on health," said Opposition Ageing Spokeswomen Julie Collins and Helen Polley.

"Access to high-quality care and support when and where older people need it is critical to making longer lives also better lives."

How will this election pledge help you? What requests would you make of either Party to protect your rights and prevent ageism?

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    COMMENTS

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    Aussie
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:20am
    Unless there are penalties and a law in place for the abusers this is another pen to paper but I hope that this is the beginning for a better future for all of us ....

    Always live with Hope ................ Have a good Day ....
    TREBOR
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:24am
    Well, governments ARE the experts in financial abuse..... so that's a good start..... and in many cases their policies have battered many into s sullen hostility and near-silence for fifty years or so.. so I guess that's a good start on the emotional violence. As for sexual - hmmmm - nasty... and how anyone can get rid of ageism any more than any of the other hostile -isms is beyond me, since they are cunningly exploited.

    I'll apply for a fat job in the public service - see how that goes as a man at 68 - or a bank or whatever.
    Aussie
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:30am
    Sorry TREBOR you are unemployable .... so your only choice is to build your own business ...he he he he or enjoy your retirement he he
    Anonymous
    3rd Oct 2017
    5:29pm
    TREBOR is eminently employable; but business might not agree.
    GeorgeM
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:12pm
    Govts create the problems financially e.g. through means testing pensions and the big brother approach via Centrelink, destroying jobs, as well as other issues noted by MICK below, and then pretend to do something about it? Can't see either major party being serious about this.
    Aussie
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:28am
    This is a comment make by MICK = 20 Nov 2015 on the "Calls to criminalise elder abuse" ..... about the same issue wowowo so long ago and now government is waking up .....

    "The next "Women’s Health" study. Does it never end.
    What you are writing about leon is 'society' at large. We have child molestation and abuse at one end, domestic violence in the middle and now elder abuse. This is the price of for the death of our )once) Christian society. God help us."

    Yes MICK agree with you but what can we do ??? unless there are penalties set up for elder abuse
    Anonymous
    3rd Oct 2017
    5:31pm
    As a serious Christian myself, one's faith under certain circumstances does not prevent elder abuse. Those trying to help the elderly can themselves wear out and snap. They should not be crucified, but given help themselves.
    Not Senile Yet!
    3rd Oct 2017
    11:34am
    Just jobs gor mates paod for by money already taken or refused due to Changes to keep the Aged in the Group below Poverty line.
    The Govt itself is the Most Abusive of the Elderly by refusing to accept that a Pension Is an entitlement if you worked hard..obeyed the Laws..paid your taxes...etc.
    This is simply patronising by No forsight and shallow Hal-al Mal and the Sell everything Libs!!
    Anonymous
    3rd Oct 2017
    5:32pm
    The government - particularly the Li(e)berals - abuse ALL pensioners.
    Linda
    3rd Oct 2017
    1:26pm
    If they decide to stop abuse and mean it, then it must contain components that go after institutions and their managers for the tricks and abuse that is played out at the legal and financial levels. Staff ratios figure into this as well because low staff numbers mean neglect.

    Home Care packages come with contracts, these contracts and the style in which the packages are administrated and managed from the top, can be financially abusive and also result in neglect.

    Old folks can look like sitting pigeons for some greedy or ethically challenged top management.

    We have retirement villages, some top management folks behave like they see them money harvesting programs.

    What ever is promised, it must contain consequences that are meaningful.
    Older people need to understand that not every service is there to help them, but instead to fleece them of their savings and remaining wealth.

    It is not always a family member or a friend. The laws need to reflect the vulnerability of some elderly people to being taken advantage of.

    What are the chances of this government rolling out anything that is meaningful. They may have the intent but if it is business as usual it will be half done, fraught with confusion and problems and things in institutions can continue as per usual.
    Linda
    3rd Oct 2017
    1:28pm
    Call me cynical.
    Rae
    3rd Oct 2017
    2:12pm
    I agree Linda. I simply can't believe that aged care when needed is priced on how much money you have saved in a lifetime. Save a lot and then pay a lot, save nothing and pay nothing. It's a very strange way to go about things. Next they'll be whining that we are spending everything and saving nothing. This sort of discriminating injustice creates cynicism.
    TREBOR
    3rd Oct 2017
    2:38pm
    I call you spot on, Linda, though I wouldn't expect any more positive results and 'outcomes' (shudders at the use of a buzz word) from their 'opposition' in The Tag Team. Politicians consider their entire focus to be around remaining elected - not serving the people.
    floss
    3rd Oct 2017
    2:54pm
    More BS from the 1.7 million man Mal and his spin doctors. Why do they spin out their rubbish you know and I know it is BS.
    Aussie
    3rd Oct 2017
    3:05pm
    No mate get ...... the correct prospective .... They need our votes mate so they will propagate any BS as they can to be re elected ...and do not be surprised that more of this will come
    MICK
    3rd Oct 2017
    3:39pm
    I'd like to see some money allocated to protecting seniors from rabid governments like the current one.
    No means testing of pensions overseas but an ever increasing tightening here to push seniors off the pension.
    Retirement Villages have been abusing retirees for decades whilst both sides of politics sit by and let business occur as elderly people are robbed by the crooks in this industry. The culprits are well known. Older Australians are discriminated against in the job market. We have all read the accounts from over 55s on this website. Only a very few get jobs and those are normally in industries where they have contacts or a shortage exists. everywhere else no chance.
    Tell me about elder abuse. This is accommodated abuse. We don't need $15 million spent on this, we need GOVERNMENT ACTION. The current one is unlikely to legislate though so unlikely anything will ever change.

    3rd Oct 2017
    5:27pm
    No amount of legislation can prevent elder abuse. The law can only punish people after the event (if they're caught out by it).

    In a deep sense, the perpetrator is a type of victim too, I know... Circumstances involving a total lack of practical support in trying to help an older person can force the well-intended helper to snap and lash out. I obviously do not condone this, but I understand it. Helpers need help too.
    musicveg
    3rd Oct 2017
    6:14pm
    Could be better spent on CTV cameras to keep an eye on abuse. I think this is another suck up to try to win voters. Real action is needed to prevent just anyone running aged care. What's a 'peak body' going to do, and an online resource most likely directing you to find help form places you already know about or don't exist.
    Anonymous
    3rd Oct 2017
    6:49pm
    So you're an advocate of "1984". Oh dear...
    musicveg
    3rd Oct 2017
    7:18pm
    Not sure what you mean, but it was just merely a suggestion.
    Anonymous
    3rd Oct 2017
    7:39pm
    "Could be better spent on CTV cameras to keep an eye on abuse."

    That sort of thing - surveillance cameras - is utterly Orwellian, as in George Orwell's famous novel "1984".
    TREBOR
    4th Oct 2017
    9:29am
    Good point, Doc.. but sometimes I wonder what steps can possibly be taken other than imposing a very strict and regulated regime. How do you stop paper bag transfers, how do you prove corruption in politics - unless you have total surveillance. Some years ago I said that when cctv was installed in NSW police stations it was not to protect the police from false accusations.... cameras in highway patrol cars make it hard to make up stories etc.... and hard for a cop to beat on someone without reason.

    Just trying for a few comparisons here.

    I've long argued on another forum about the way strict and controlling regimes come into play in nations, and the main reason is simply that the laissez faire approach is anything but fair and above reproach. A big issue.
    Anonymous
    4th Oct 2017
    2:43pm
    I'm with you on nearly all of that, TREBOR. Your last paragraph reminds me of Plato's "Republic". He talks about politics being cyclical: the oppression of a tyrant leads to public revolt; that leads to democracy (or, at worst, ochlocracy), which in turn manifests abuse of freedom, followed by calls for greater control and 'strong leadership', whence tyranny again - which is where we are headed.
    SuziJ
    4th Oct 2017
    9:22am
    It most likely won't do anything for me.

    I'm on a waiting list for NSW public housing. There needs to be more 55+ accommodation with at least 2 bedrooms & plenty of storage. The Federal govt can give the NSW govt some of this money to build communities designed specifically for 55+ to rent, especially in regional & rural communities. It's not enough to have only one facility in a city of 60,000+. Yet, there's at least 3 retirement villages for those who can afford to purchase.
    There's also a very big disparity between the accommodation offered by the different retirement establishments. The ones you pay for when you sell your house can give you at least 1 with plenty of room for a computer room, mostly 2, if not 3 bedrooms, yet the ones offered for rental are only single bedrooms - what a joke for those of us having to rent! I'd rather live in the community in a 2 bedroom unit (all ground level) with a lovely landlord than move into a single bedroom unit and lose my rent assistance all together.

    The Federal govt can give us a rise in our pension rates. They are dismal, and not keeping up with the cost of living. Just because the GDP is going well, the cost of basic things like butter/butter blends (a home-branded product) has just gone up by 75 cents each in the past 4 weeks (from $3.75 to 4.50), and that's a 20% rise, so where's our 20% rise in pensions? Never will we see the light of day for this.

    Get rid of the payment of Aussie pensions overseas. The only time you should be able to receive an Aussie pension whilst overseas is if you go on a holiday, and have a return ticket that indicates that you have every intention of returning to Australia to live here.

    If you want to live overseas, then you have to finance it for yourself and not rely on our Federal govt to fund it for you.

    The DSP is CUT OFF if you're overseas for more than 28 days in a 12 month rolling year. Give us the benefits that the Age Pension gets, not restrict us more! Then when you return, you have to re-apply for the DSP, which could take up to 13 weeks to get back. Give us a break! If this is not elder abuse, what is?

    Just because I don't yet qualify for the Age Pension, it doesn't mean that I'm not an elder (they consider it to be 55+).

    When I first started work, all those years ago, I was eligible for the Age Pension @ 60, and this has been eroded to 65, and now 66.5. The older I get, the further away the Age Pension seems to get.
    Anonymous
    4th Oct 2017
    2:46pm
    Absolutely spot-on SuziJ. Bravo!
    Aussie
    5th Oct 2017
    12:52am
    SuziJ and all others like DrPolymath

    Again and again I am tire to write the same thing for so long .... Please convince me that with the pension only income you can live a decent life in Australia (Renting - No properties or other income) in comparison with a nice living across the beach in Bali eating well and enjoying a nice time .... PROVE THIS TO ME IN FINANCIAL DETAILS IF YOU CAN AND YOU CAN INCLUDE RENTAL ASSISTANCE IF YOU WANT ..... So have fun calculating the day/week and monthly expenditure and please include Electricity, Gas and other house payments you need to do and of course Insurance ......

    .......... retirees in overseas are saving the gov. $4,000 plus other services of around $15,000 x year each (Other services that they do not get and you do) and considering that are over 80,000 living overseas the savings are over 1.3 to 1.5 BILLION dollars x year.

    You and other retirees living in Australia can get HOUSING, MEDICARE and many many more FREE assistance help.

    Retirees overseas only get the basic pension and $23 supplement that is all ..... NO MEDICARE OR ANY OTHER SERVICES just the basic small pension ... They pay for all other services themself like Medical and all other free services we get living in Australia

    You must live and work in Australia for over 30 years otherwise you get a lot less or nothing .... so READ AND LEARN what are the rules and law available for you and all of us pensioners living in Australia or overseas.

    PLEASE LEARN BEFORE YOU MADE UNSUBSTANTIATED STATEMENTS

    Quoting your statement ......

    "Get rid of the payment of Aussie pensions overseas. The only time you should be able to receive an Aussie pension whilst overseas is if you go on a holiday, and have a return ticket that indicates that you have every intention of returning to Australia to live here.

    If you want to live overseas, then you have to finance it for yourself and not rely on our Federal govt to fund it for you."

    Refer to Centrelink site for detail information as follows and learn that we are not alone in the world ..... Please:

    https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/enablers/pension-rates-payable-people-outside-australia

    https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/centrelink/international-social-security-agreements

    https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/enablers/age-pension-if-you-travel-outside-australia

    And this lots of info for you people to complain more and more ...... https://www.yourlifechoices.com.au/government/pension/claiming-your-pension-overseas


    NOW YOU HAVE ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED TO MAKE EDUCATED STATEMENTS IN THE FUTURE.
    Aussie
    5th Oct 2017
    1:40am
    And just to add a little more mental ammunition for you to complain and complain he he he he try this for more information ......

    This way I just complete my delivery of info for you people that need to learn about some overseas goodies and better retirement or welfare living ... whatever you call the age pension retirement.

    Have fun .....

    https://internationalliving.com/au/author/international-living/

    And this Wowowowowo

    https://internationalliving.com/au/fast-track-your-retirement-overseas-conference-2018/
    Anonymous
    5th Oct 2017
    10:33am
    Aussie, your 'essay' is garbled and self-contradictory. What's your point? Sneering at those a lot less well-off than you?
    Aussie
    5th Oct 2017
    1:31pm
    DrPolymath
    Sorry if you do not understand my writing ... sorry I am confused and contradictory .... sorry if I confuse you ... my point is that we are saving the gov. a lot of money if we live overseas with the Pension/Welfare ... That is all and it is extremely unfair to say that we are a burden for the government ..... sorry .. WE ARE NOT A BURDEN .... you people are very very jealous of what the people overseas are doing and living a great life with only the pension as income.

    By the way I only have my pension and live on a room in a shared home with my daugther family .... I can not afford to live on my own place so I am considering strongly to stay outside permanently .... so I am sorry if I am making you jealous or maybe you have a lot of money property etc that you can live a nice life in Australia

    Sorry for my comments I know I am very confused by please honor your name DrPolimath and do the Maths
    Anonymous
    5th Oct 2017
    1:49pm
    I'll do this in reverse, since you are clearly backward.

    "Sorry for my comments I know I am very confused by please honor your name DrPolimath and do the Maths"

    Yep - you are indeed those things. Plus you can't spell correctly: it's "honour", not "honor"; "polymath", not "polimath". And just to dispel your evident ignorance, a polymath is somebody who is very good at a number of things (not necessarily mathematics - though, as it happens, I studied 3 years of honours-level pure mathematics at the University of Sydney).

    "so I am sorry if I am making you jealous"

    Believe me, you have absolutely NOTHING which would make me jealous of you.

    "Sorry if you do not understand my writing ... sorry I am confused and contradictory"

    I do not understand your writing BECAUSE it is (and you are) confused and contradictory. You should be sorry for that.

    "That is all and it is extremely unfair to say that we are a burden for the government."

    Where the hell did I say or imply that? NOWHERE!

    "you people are very very jealous of what the people overseas are doing and living a great life with only the pension as income."

    A mind reader, are you? Rather delusional, I'd say. Get some help.
    Aussie
    5th Oct 2017
    3:38pm
    DrPolymath

    Exactly as expected he he he he ...... people like you do not reach my shoes he he he he and they are a few like you in this forum ... Good luck ... you can keep insulting and making all the comments you want ..... so keep it up will do great for your health he he he he.

    Thank you teacher for correcting my gramar oppppps maybe I should write in French Ummmmmm and thak you for reading my stupid comments I appreciat your help ... Thanks a lot

    G'Day have fun he he he he
    Anonymous
    5th Oct 2017
    3:47pm
    "people like you do not reach my shoes"

    Indeed - because I'm too far above them to reach down to your level.

    "you can keep insulting and making all the comments you want"

    Well thank you so much for your permission. I'm ever so grateful...

    "so keep it up will do great for your health"

    Oh it does, it does! I really enjoy vaporizing nasty plasmodea.

    "G'Day have fun".

    I have, am, and will.

    Now run along, little child.

    "and thak [sic] you for reading my stupid comments I appreciat [sic] your help ... Thanks a lot "

    Oh, my pleasure. And I'm glad you appreciate my help which, God knows, you sorely need.

    "Thank you teacher for correcting my gramar [sic]".

    Oh, it's been a pleasure. Now you need to work on your spelling - e.g. "grammar".
    ex PS
    4th Oct 2017
    9:24am
    How dare Industry and individuals abuse the Elders, surely the government sees that as there job.
    Eddy
    4th Oct 2017
    9:28am
    Of what possible use will these measures, ie on-line resources and training programs, be to my 94yo mother-in-law who lives with us (and is cared for by my wife for the princely sum of $125 f/n from Centrelink). Mum is stretched trying to remember how to operate her electric chair (or should I rephrase that to electrically operated lift chair) and she can no longer read, knit or watch TV due to her failing eyesight. We already get periodic visits by a caring young lady from the local council and she gets an annual visit from an occupational therapist sent by DVA (Mums a war widow) to see if there is anything she needs in material aids.
    This smacks to me of tokenism, their heart is in the right place, and they want to do something, but do not want to spend too much money doing it. Maybe what is needed is warm bodies who can actually visit the elderly, monitor their treatment and physical welfare and, if necessary, 'audit' their finances. However this will cost many times more than $15M.
    TREBOR
    4th Oct 2017
    9:36am
    Know how you feel, Eddy - I'm a carer on $125 a fortnight, and it doesn't cover the petrol and wear and tear on the car, and I get no visits to help.

    Facilities on the ground is the way to go, as you say, and not just some place you can ring and be referred on.

    This is a sure sign that an election year is looming..... a token here, a token there.....

    6th Oct 2017
    8:23pm
    Having experienced financial/emotional abuse in my own family where my late father was concerned I wish this had been around 10 years ago.
    *Loloften*
    20th Nov 2017
    4:25am
    Ageism is normal, we all get old. Lack of compassionate understanding & appropriate care is not - especially when one's spouse is diagnosed with a terminal illness in their 30s, 40s, 50s & both forced to leave the workforce, thereby no longer earning Super & savings totally depleted by "gap" Health Insurance payments during the yrs if lucky enough to enjoy your unwell spouse's company for a few extra yrs past their "use by date" as mine joking called it.


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