Which skirt is best for your shape?

Just like bodies, skirts come in all shapes and sizes. Find out which one is best for your figure.

Woman with nice legs wearing a red skirt

Somewhat of a wardrobe staple, skirts are not just for summer. Easily worn over stockings in winter, they also provide a fantastic alternative to a dress for events, allowing you to mix and match separates and ensuring you don’t end up with something you only wear once. 

Having said that, depending on your body type and shape, some skirts will suit you more than others. Here’s how to choose the skirt that will best flatter your figure. 

Petite
If you’re on the shorter end of the height spectrum, you are one of the lucky few who can get away with shorter skirts. They help to elongate legs, particularly if you choose a skirt with a slightly flared silhouette. 

Tall
For us giraffes of the world, aka anyone 5’7” and taller, an asymmetrical skirt allows you to show off your height while not exposing too much. For best results opt for a mid-length skirt that is slightly higher on one side. 

Pear
If your hips are wider than your shoulder and you have fuller thighs, an A-line skirt helps to accentuate the smallest part of your figure, aka your waist. This style of skirt will also balance out your bottom and avoid you looking heavier than you are. 

Hourglass
For those whose shoulders and hips are similar in size and waist is smaller, pencil skirts are the style to pick. As with the A-line skirt, they will draw attention to your waist and skim you frame to highlight the shape on your hips. Pencil skirts also help to balance out a bigger bust. 

Straight
If you have a straight up-and-down shape with minimal curves, and similar bust, waist and hip measurements, a skirt with a ruffled bottom helps to add both texture and a feminine silhouette.

What’s your favourite skirt to wear? Have you found a particular style that flatters you the most? We’d love to hear your tips in the comments. 

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    COMMENTS

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    Janran
    8th Jul 2016
    11:14am
    Hey SJ, you left out the category of average height and a bit overweight - just as the fashion industry does. Typically, the larger the size, the taller you must be, according to the fashion industry.

    You are spot on about an A-line skirt for anyone with larger hips. AVOID FLARED SKIRTS!

    I am an "hourglass" but I avoid pencil skirts like the plague because they are too restricting. Much better a long A-line skirt, cut on the bias so it clings in, not flared out. As you say, this accentuates the shape of the hips. Wear with sensible heels - I call this the "mermaid" look.
    sunny
    8th Jul 2016
    7:09pm
    I am an apple shape, not a pear, not tall, not straight, not petite nor an hourglass.
    What do I wear then?
    Janran
    8th Jul 2016
    7:28pm
    I reckon same as above (long A-line skirt, cut on the bias so it clings in, not flared out.) Wear with sensible or otherwise heels to give you some elevation and elongation. Team it with a top that fits neatly at the bust but then loose and flowing (but not a "swing" top) to just below the widest part of you hips. This gives the impression of a hidden but hinted waistline and then the mermaid hips, legs covered (unless they are good, in which case show then off with a short hemline and a tiny flare just above the knees, especially if you are short) and then the heels to elongate.

    The flowing part of the top should flow over and cover the biggest part of the "apple", which is usually at the front. Try some crossover chiffon layers.

    See what works for you - ask a trusted and truthful friend.
    Anonymous
    8th Jul 2016
    11:16pm
    I'm an apple shape too, maybe we are not meant to wear any skirts!
    musicveg
    9th Jul 2016
    5:17pm
    I am over wearing skirts a long time ago, why don't men wear them? So why do women?
    jackie
    5th Aug 2016
    1:07pm
    I prefer to wear a skirt or dress in the warmer weather than pants.


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