16th Mar 2017

Kenya has faster internet speeds than Australia

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Kenya has faster internet speeds than Australia
Drew Patchell

The latest quarterly Akamai State of the Internet report has Australia ranked outside the top 50, with Kenya and Thailand enjoying higher internet speeds.

Since the end of 2015, Australia's average home broadband speeds have actually increased from 9.6Mbps to 10.1MBps. Despite these improvements, Australia has dropped to 51st on the list with countries such as Thailand, Kenya, and even Estonia beating Australia for fast internet speeds.

Top 10 countries
1. South Korea: 26.1Mbps
2. Norway: 23.6Mbps
3. Sweden: 22.817.3Mbps
4. Hong Kong: 21.9Mbps
5. Switzerland: 21.23Mbps
6. Denmark: 20.7Mbps
7. Finland 20.6Mbps
8. Singapore: 20.2Mbps
9. Japan: 19.6Mbps
10. Netherlands: 17.6Mbps

It’s not all bad news, as Australia leads the Asia-Pacific region in mobile connectivity, with a mobile connection speed of 13.8Mbps – well ahead of the North American leader, Canada, which has just 10.3Mbps connection speeds.



The NBN rollout is expected to take our nation closer to the 25Mbps connection speed and, when the rollout is completed in the coming years, we can expect Australia’s ranking to improve significantly.

What do you think? Does this report show that we aren’t moving fast enough on the NBN project? Or are the results more rosy than they appear due to our vast rural population?

Read more at The Age

Related articles:
Internet prices to fall
NBN cost blowout
NBN “rushed, chaotic and inadequate”





COMMENTS

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Fredklaus
16th Mar 2017
11:07am
FTTN box across the road from me for 18 months,NBN still working on it to get it to work.Great work NBN and M T.
inextratime
16th Mar 2017
11:12am
Last night my speed was down to 0.89mps download and 0.10 mps upload and that's a Telstra cable connect. Try running a business from home !
Old Man
16th Mar 2017
11:20am
As a casual user of the internet I have to say that our existing service gives us all we need. If we need to catch up on a TV show we have missed, it can be watched online without buffering. Downloading a movie takes a while but as we are retired time is not an important factor. It still downloads quicker than if we were to sit and watch the movie online.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
11:45am
You are right no good of having quick internet service if you don't need it. I haven't had any buffeting since I have been on the NBN. However it does go down more often than ADSL but is only for a minute or so then reconnects itself.

As it doesn't work on the phone line it is good because if the phone is out then we have internet and can use it for making calls as well.
Jolly
16th Mar 2017
11:51am
One problem with NBN FTTN when the power goes off so do the phones, unless you have a battery back up phone. So for emergencies you need a mobile.
Old Man
16th Mar 2017
11:52am
You confuse me Old Geezer, the NBN in this area uses the existing phone lines although the handsets we had don't work and NBN supplies a different format handset.

And I'm pleased that you are no longer getting bashed up (buffeting) since the NBN came in but I wonder how the NBN stopped that.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
12:08pm
Old Man my NBN does not use my phone line. It is called fixed wireless and I have a receiver on my roof pointing to a NBN tower across the valley. It is similar to using a mobile phone but is supposed to get a better faster signal. My mobile phone actually gets a signal as good as it and runs faster as we are also in direct line to a mobile phone tower. I still have the old copper phone line in place because if the power goes out I would have no phone.
Paicey58
16th Mar 2017
11:33am
The average speed in Aust us 10.1 ??? I dream of having that speed. Ours gets nothing but 3 which is bearly enough to run Netflix!!!
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
11:41am
Mine is running just a bit over 10 today but can get to nearly 50. No trouble even at 10 doing what everyone wants to do around here.
tj
16th Mar 2017
11:48am
Wish I could get 3 usually about one once I got 2.02 thought I was on a roll but didn't last long
Rosret
16th Mar 2017
12:20pm
OG you must be on full fibre optic and not an extension from the node.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
12:24pm
No I'm on fixed wireless NBN with no cables leaving the house. I have a receiver on my roof that points to a NBN tower across the valley.
Rosret
16th Mar 2017
12:18pm
Yes. Sadly the NBN internet to the node is as slow as ADSL2 and we are paying more for the higher speed option. Then its down when you need it so there goes the phone line too.
Looks like the super highway is not so super.
My advise to anyone who has a choice - hold onto ADSL2 as long as you can!
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
12:21pm
I changed over to NBN because it was a lot cheaper and find it is a lot better than the old ADSL for me.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
12:27pm
http://www.nbnco.com.au/sell-nbn-services/products-services-pricing/fixed-wireless.html
john
17th Mar 2017
11:21am
My phone is ruined since the NBN, it does weird things ,and the message bank has disappeared, the other night it ring tone was completely different, I still get nuisance calls, that I had blocked , not being very technical I am quite surprised at how different things have changed, this morning my internet is reasonable , but yesterday it was terrible.
How will that ever change.
Not Senile Yet!
16th Mar 2017
12:36pm
Comparing apples with oranges does not help anyone!
The Leading Countries simply have lees land area and are more densely populated......Size and distance matter when broadband speed is discussed.
Comparison should be city to city not Country to Country.
Other missed factor....Population!
100 million can pay less and achieve more if all in one City. We only have 2-5 million in a city .....so no comparison due to scales!
Marten
16th Mar 2017
2:15pm
100 million if all in one city? I might mention here that the countries listed in Europe do not have cities as large as Sydney and Melbourne and are populated under one million!
As you said one cannot compare apples with oranges. Need I say more?
Marten
16th Mar 2017
1:04pm
As a casual user of the internet I have to say that our existing service gives us all we need. If we need to catch up on a TV show we have missed, it can be watched online without buffering. Quote: old man.
It may provide you as a casual user all you need, but the majority of people, including people working from home or conducting a business elsewhere it leaves a lot to be desired compared with many countries overseas. One only needs to read the many adverse comments presented by users Australia wide who spend their time other than merely watching a TV show or a movie.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
1:20pm
We have no trouble and can't tell the difference between 10 and 50Mbps even with multiple computers and other devices running at the same time. It is correctly running at 10Mbp and there are 2 desktops running, plus 2 mobiles and 2 tablets without any problems.
Wallich
16th Mar 2017
1:09pm
Drool on this. Currently in Thailand, FTTB, 30/10 Mbps, always faster, UNLIMITED downloads, A$24 per month! Had this service for over two years.
bobbalinda
16th Mar 2017
1:24pm
People I know who have the NBN hate it. Costs more, their old system worked better and if you want a home phone no choice you have to connect to NBN! This covers areas of Port Stephens to the Blue Mountains not just 1 area.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
1:34pm
The NBN is so much better than the old ADSL was for me. It is a lot cheaper and works so much better.

I was given a choice to either keep old phone or get a new digital one. I was advised to keep old phone.
Sundays
16th Mar 2017
1:48pm
Where I live in regional Queensland the NBN is so much better than what we had before! The only issue was negotiating with Optus to ensure we got the same very good deal we had pre NBN
Observer
16th Mar 2017
1:57pm
After leaving Oz and NBN speeds of 25mbps (crappie) I have moved to Pakistan where Internet speed is 2mbps. I guesstimate the Internet speed is 4-5 times faster in Pakistan than the NBN in Australia. Very "fishy".
btony
16th Mar 2017
2:02pm
I gave up both NBN and ADSL and went for wi- fi from my $G phone, still as fast if not faster than both the others
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
6:39pm
My Wifi from my phone is as good as my NBN at times too but if I was to use in all the time it would be vey expensive in this household. If it was the same price as the NBN I certainly would use it instead.
btony
16th Mar 2017
2:03pm
oops 4G that is
Evan Gelist
16th Mar 2017
3:11pm
We all seem to assume that slow internet performance is associated with the communication bottleneck, which being a shared service, does slow down as traffic load increases. This may be the case for you. Whilst NBN is much faster than ADSL, it still goes slow at times. However, as NBN is rolled-out and more people suck more and faster data through the internet, it appears that the host servers may be struggling to keep up. Watching a just released TV programme may require buffering as some aspect of the server is fully loaded. Testing NBN performance often shows no problems at these times. Switch to an older episode of the same programme off the same server (which is not in such great demand) and buffering is no longer necessary. Retirees can usually watch recently released programmes without buffering by choosing to watch when others are at work. During these times, the internet may be just as loaded with (business) traffic, but the TV servers are relatively idle.
Evan Gelist
16th Mar 2017
3:12pm
We all seem to assume that slow internet performance is associated with the communication bottleneck, which being a shared service, does slow down as traffic load increases. This may be the case for you. Whilst NBN is much faster than ADSL, it still goes slow at times. However, as NBN is rolled-out and more people suck more and faster data through the internet, it appears that the host servers may be struggling to keep up. Watching a just released TV programme may require buffering as some aspect of the server is fully loaded. Testing NBN performance often shows no problems at these times. Switch to an older episode of the same programme off the same server (which is not in such great demand) and buffering is no longer necessary. Retirees can usually watch recently released programmes without buffering by choosing to watch when others are at work. During these times, the internet may be just as loaded with (business) traffic, but the TV servers are relatively idle.
billy boy
16th Mar 2017
3:17pm
speeds are faster with nbn, as to adsl, but they will only slightly raise speeds up every year, with a price point, to earn more money every year, the providers will not do super speeds, immediately, until they milk the system, over many years, sadly
Raphael
16th Mar 2017
4:14pm
Just abandon the NBN project and Wait for 5G to be rolled out by the private sector

NBN is already a white elephane
etc1
16th Mar 2017
5:34pm
NBN is a joke. I have Wireless NBN with iinet.I live 10klm Nth, West of Ballarat Vic. Pay for 25bps per month.Only average 2. Theft is what it is. Iinet should be more accountable.
Hawkeye
16th Mar 2017
11:10pm
etc1, if you pay for 25bps, how much do they charge you?
If it's more than 1c per year it is highway robbery.
The Australia Post mail service is faster than that.
And I reckon I can type with my nose faster than that.
I pay about $60 for 1 million times that speed.
etc1
17th Mar 2017
4:01am
I pay about $69. with VOIP phone and free calls. I know all about band widths and such. But. these ISP's need to be accountable for the mis leading adverts. They possibly have to many subscribers on a sub standard service. Why should I wait until this time of day to get a little extra NBN speed? The adverts don't mention that part of the deal, do they? People need to keep lodging complaints. Maybe some hefty fines might change things...
Hawkeye
17th Mar 2017
10:15am
etc1, you miss my point.

You say you pay for 25bps and average 2bps.
At 25bps it would take a couple of weeks to download a single web page, and at 2bps it would take a couple of months.

So I think you mean you pay for 25Mbps, which is 1million times 25bps.

And the average download speed you see has nothing to do with your ISP. It is slow because the data you are trying to download is hosted on a slow overloaded server (try downloading anything from HP, the slowest servers on the planet).

If you want a realistic indication of what your ISP is giving you, run the OOKLA SpeedTest. (Google it)
etc1
16th Mar 2017
5:35pm
NBN is a joke. I have Wireless NBN with iinet.I live 10klm Nth, West of Ballarat Vic. Pay for 25bps per month.Only average 2. Theft is what it is. Iinet should be more accountable.
Thai Traveller
16th Mar 2017
6:14pm
Unlimited internet is available in Thailand for $24.00 a month. It runs at a good speed.

So why is it so expensive here?
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
9:54pm
It like everything else it is much more expensive here because we all pay what is called an Australia tax. I give you a recent example. A few weeks ago I needed a part and it's cost in Australia was $30 plus postage but to buy and ship it out of Hong Kong I could buy 2 of those parts for $6 in total. As it wasn't urgent and I could wait 3-4 weeks I got them from Hong Kong. Yes they were exactly the same as the ones for sale in Australia.
Hawkeye
16th Mar 2017
9:42pm
I am approx 100km north of Adelaide and on FTTN
Since connecting to NBN I get a consistent 23.4Mbps dowload and 4.7Mbps upload speed as measured by the OOKLA SpeedTest. I pay for 25/5 so I reckon that's pretty good.
On ADSL I used to average about 12/2.5 and it cost a lot more.

I think many of you are getting confused between Mbps (bits) and MBps (Bytes).
1 Byte=8 bits, so I think those of you who say you are getting about 3 are actually getting 3MBps, which is actually 24Mbps.

Also, the NBN speed is what you are capable of getting down the pipe to your machine, but the speed you see during a normal download is equal to the capability of the server, divided by all the users of the server at that time, which is generally very slow.
This means a single web page will not download any faster on the NBN, but multiple web pages will, because the pipe is bigger. The biggest benefit will be less strangulation of the internet by advertisers using up all the bandwidth, which is why dial-up internet (and increasingly ADSL) is no longer workable. But eventually the advertisers will strangle the NBN as well.
Old Geezer
16th Mar 2017
10:08pm
Just did some testing and my NBN is now running at 24Mbps whereas earlier today it was only 10Mbps. When I connected they said I could get up to about 25Mbps but it has been up to 46Mbps. There was no restriction placed on it but they said I would get whatever was available when I used it. It was cheaper than my very slow ADSL1 at about 1Mbps.
Laurella
16th Mar 2017
9:53pm
We have been connected to the NBN network for about 6 weeks now - and it is woeful! Completely inconsistent! How could they have spent so much money on this & it is actually worse than our previous ADSL!
Thanks again Labour for another stuffup!!
Hawkeye
16th Mar 2017
10:14pm
Laurella, if you got the NBN 6 weeks ago (as did I), you are probably connected to the Abbott/Turnbull version of it.
Considering that Labor has had nothing to do with the NBN for 3½ years, and it was Turnbull (as Abott's Communications Minister) who forced the obsolete and costly FTTN on to us, I would think that you are actually suffering from from another Liberal stuff-up.
Please give credit where credit is due.
Hawkeye
16th Mar 2017
10:36pm
Further, the Liberals when they forced FTTN on us, reduced the guaranteed minimum NBN speed from 25/5Mbps down to only 12/1Mbps (slower than ADSL) for an 18 month period after connection of each area.
Sounds like an admission of a Liberal stuff-up to me.

If you are lucky enough that your copper connection is in good nick, you will get the speed you paid for. But if your copper is rotted, it will not be fixed if they can show it is capable of that reduced speed.
If you love the Lib's you should be happy to live with it.
Rae
17th Mar 2017
9:30am
Get new cable from the Node and fix it. Then you will have the system the ALP planned. Now you are running on a LNP/Telstra service with 20th century tech in the last leg.

Blaming Labor for everything is so old fashioned now. The LNP is in it's second term already.
BundyGil
16th Mar 2017
10:42pm
Simple. The LNP decided in their wisdom, or total lack of, at the behest of that technological genius, toxic Tony, along with the current PM, who knew better but went along with TT's folly anyway , that a hybrid system with FTTN would save a couple of dollars. This has proved to be total bullshit, as are most things emanating from this incompetent government, with the result we are now saddled with crap internet, neither fish or fowl, as the saying goes.
john
17th Mar 2017
11:15am
The NBN was always going to cost big big money, you don't get top line for cheap pay out. That's what happened in my opinion when the original ALP plan was scrapped. And the cheaper version was brought in because we couldn't afford it. Unfortunately the problem with that is that down the track if the secondary plan is not up to it, you end up spending more than the original expensive idea.
You can't build strawberry jam out of cow manure. You have to spend to get the best in a case like this.
Anyway the problem these days is who really cares, the cyber world is not secure and never will be.
Hawkeye
18th Mar 2017
12:08pm
The Liberals "cheaper" FTTN is now actually costing more than full fibre, and will also be subject to continual maintenance costs due to rotting of the copper cable, which in most areas has been in the ground for over 50 years.

Then, of course, there will be the additional expense of ripping it all out and replacing it with fibre for long-term reliability. Our more tech-savvy neighbours over the ditch in New Zealand are in the process of doing that right now.
Maybe the Lib's could reduce costs by making an offer for the gear NZ is ripping out. After all second-hand gear for a second-rate system is probably appropriate.

The simple fact is that while FTTN IS QUITE CAPABLE OF HANDLING CURRENT COMMUNICATIONS LOADS (provided that your copper has not rotted away), it is just CAN NOT HANDLE THE LOADS PROJECTED FOR THE NEAR FUTURE with acceptable reliability.
JAID
18th Mar 2017
10:46am
Using NBN, it is rare my speed is not up between the top two or three on the list. The scale of the infrastructure problem in providing that makes you wonder however how often work of that scale would be necessary to keep on catching up.
Fair Go
10th Apr 2017
1:00pm
Really, IF I can get the Internet at all speed is usually below 2 MBPM, have complained to provider, Telstra, even Ombudsman, no-one takes responsibility, still hardly any Internet. Trouble started when NBN rolled down my street, nearly 5 months ago. I now have nowhere else to go, I am not yet connected to the NBN, wonder if that will solve my problem?
Doubtful, the way things are going.


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