19th Feb 2015
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Death in the digital age
Death in the digital age

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy, and knowing how to quickly deactivate their online accounts can save you from a lot of unnecessary pain.

It’s also important to plan ahead for your own death, to ensure a stress-free process for your loved ones. One way to do this is to include your digital passwords in your will. After you pass away, this makes deactivation of online accounts easier for whoever is responsible.

An alternative way to handle this area is to use a website such as SecureSafe.

SecureSafe has a feature called Data Inheritance that allows you to upload all of your important or sensitive digital files, as well as all your online login details; it will then transfer them to a nominated beneficiary, should you pass away.

This will make it easy for beneficiaries to access your data, close accounts, and ensure that no money or digital points, such as frequent flyer miles, go to waste.

Read more at SecureSafe.com.

Digital death and deactivation

Should you find yourself handling the deactivation of online accounts without access to passwords and account information, you should try to get a copy of the death certificate and some sort of proof that you are an immediate family member. Some websites will accept the death certificate as proof while others may ask for more, such as a birth or marriage certificate, or a government-issued ID card. 

Hackers and scammers can and will pretend that someone has died to take advantage. Unfortunately, this means that websites will need lots of proof before they deactivate accounts. Having access to these documents will make your hard task much less painful.

Click NEXT to read about how to deactivate online social networking and email accounts. 

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    COMMENTS

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    KSS
    26th Feb 2015
    12:37pm
    You should also think about iTunes and similar. You do NOT own the music you have paid for. You just rent it. This means you cannot bequeath your electronic music collection in the way you may have done your records and CDs.


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