13th Sep 2018
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New airport rules give police full ID check powers
New airport rules give police full ID check powers

As part of a raft of rules being implemented across Australian airports, travellers may receive fines of $4200 or face imprisonment if they refuse to comply with new police powers.

Anyone who looks suspicious can now be apprehended and asked for identification and if travellers do not cooperate, they can be ejected form airports and banned from flights.

Legislation introduced to Parliament on Tuesday means police will now be able to carry out identity checks when travellers look suspicious or threatening.

“Police at our airports are highly trained in behavioural analysis and threat assessments. However, they don’t currently have the power to check ID unless they can link behaviour to a specific offence,” said Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton.

“The proposed powers are commensurate with aviation security threats and will help our police protect the Australian community."

Uncooperative travellers could face fines of up to $4200, 12 months’ imprisonment if they provide false information or two years if they obstruct a Commonwealth official.

Prior to the new laws, Australian Federal Police (AFP) could not identify potential threats until a clear breach or crime was committed. The new rules mean AFP can effectively ask anyone for ID and if not satisfied, fine or arrest flyers.

While many Australians will welcome the extra layer of security at airports, Labor wishes to further investigate the potential impact of the legislation. Greens senator Nick McKim has also called on Labor to oppose the changes, saying that Mr Dutton is just “attacking the basic rights of every Australian to distract from the multiple scandals he’s involved in”.

“There is no justification for this ‘papers please’ policy," said Mr McKim.

“This adds to the over 200 legislative changes over the last 20 years which remove fundamental rights and freedoms from Australian people.”

Are you comfortable with the new legislation?

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    COMMENTS

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    Crazy Horse
    15th Sep 2018
    6:19am
    More distraction politics from this increasingly desperate Govetnment in the last few months of it’s existence.
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    8:12am
    No it isn’t it’s politicians finally doing what we pay them for, but you will never please some people, such is life.
    heyyybob
    15th Sep 2018
    9:11am
    Yes Jim, agree. Sadly it is only one way our lives have changed in the last 10-20 years BUT NOT a big inconvenience if you are a law-abiding person and have a thick skin :) 'Such is life' - Cheers, Ned.
    Ferny
    15th Sep 2018
    9:38am
    And this its doesn’t have an apostrophe Crazy Horse. It’s just ‘its’.
    Triss
    15th Sep 2018
    1:02pm
    That’s not the subject we’re discussing. Try and keep up, Ferny.
    gramps
    15th Sep 2018
    6:28am
    No problem with this
    Nerk
    15th Sep 2018
    7:12am
    Its really to stop pensioners leaving the country and enjoying themselves.
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    8:13am
    Go on I will bite, how is this going to stop pensioners leaving the country, or as I suspect are you being facetious?
    Concerned
    15th Sep 2018
    7:12am
    On my way back this year phot ID did not recognise my face. And that of several other women, we then had to wait in a queue and be identified manually. I was still not identified and had to stand around waiting. Asked if I had other ID. Yeah my drivers lisence Same photo. After awhile I asked if my husband - who had been Identified by the facial recognition could identify me. Absolutely ridiculous and almost missed my flight. A piece of paper is only as good as the photo. What next let’s all have fingerprints. People who wish to use false identification will have better documents and will still not be identified as a problem. This lot se terosists under every stone. It is just another scare tactic. I am waiting for the next Terri’s attack so this government can prove we all need to be herded like sheep and totally controlled.
    KSS
    15th Sep 2018
    10:15am
    You already have to give fingerprints when using the auto-identification lanes!
    Alan
    15th Sep 2018
    1:30pm
    Fortunately, terrorist attacks are rare but the consequences can be horrendous in terms of mass deaths involving an aeroplane. The number of lives affected would be much more than the number of passengers and crew who were the unlucky victims of a successful attack. We pay heavily for security and it is a price worth paying. I have no problems with being able to identify myself at an airport - the only reason that I am there is to catch a flight and I have to present a passport in any case.
    musicveg
    15th Sep 2018
    4:28pm
    More people die from preventable diseases every year Alan, don't see the Government doing anything about that. Still allowing imported packaged food that makes people sick.
    Ductape
    16th Sep 2018
    11:19am
    Just waiting for the day when photo ID confuses the facial features of someone completely innocent with a low life with very similar features - and then the innocent person has to prove they are NOT the person identified as being the low-life!
    TREBOR
    16th Sep 2018
    12:14pm
    Hmm - what about identity theft..... had that done once... went to renew licence and was asked about things in Queensland....
    Ed
    15th Sep 2018
    7:14am
    There we go, chipping away at our freedom, don't tell me the police won't abuse this power,it's not necessary to have this law, if the police see someone acting suss at the airport they have enough power already to detain. Don't you all see one day we'll wake up and realise we can't even fart without being arrested, 200 legislative changes to our freedom of movement in the last 20 years.....I may be 70 but I still know when we are being had by this PERFIDIOUS polly ex cop being investigated for corruption Dutton
    TREBOR
    15th Sep 2018
    8:01am
    To strike up the old violin - this kind of nonsense/insanity began with the delusion within 'government' that it had some right to impose restrictions on individual not found guilty of any wrong - via 'domestic violence laws' that were deliberately designed to attack a certain demographic and which were designed to deliberately 'make it easy to gain convictions' - in 98% of case - for NO wrongdoing.

    Been warning you all since this started - including the 'law reform commission' with my submission in 1992 on this very issue.

    Now we are burdened with the spectre of government at any time enacting any rules it wants and handing to its lackeys all power over the individual at any time and without any need for proof of any kind.

    As a nation, I was beginning to think we were finally moving away from the notion that the servants of the State could make any assumption, and that was sufficient for any individual to be 'guilty'.... this occurs in courts on a daily basis, BTW - despite the fact that under our English-based law, the concept that 'the word of a person of standing in the community or a 'laird' - i.e. a police officer or public servant - was proof sufficient in a court of law and over-rode the defence of the common individual, has been illegal for centuries, since Magna Carta.

    For two centuries here the police in the 'bush' have been called 'the aristocracy of the bush' - with total control at whim over any common person at any time.

    WHEN will we, as a nation, grow up a little?
    TREBOR
    15th Sep 2018
    8:07am
    missed a bit.. after 'aristocracy of the bush' - needs:-

    'now this unwarranted and illegal power and control has been moved to the cities'.
    miker
    15th Sep 2018
    7:16am
    very comfortable
    Hairy
    15th Sep 2018
    7:28am
    Yes I am .since the moslem invasion all security has been enhanced.to ignore the threat is shutting your eyes to deaths in the air.the sooner we have solid unbreachabke ways of ID the better to weed out the scum.
    TREBOR
    15th Sep 2018
    7:52am
    Why then does this self-same government persist with the Moslem Invasion, rather than saying, "Enough!"

    Most Moslems are not violent etc, and the government should be on its knees apologising to the people for bringing in those who are non-assimilable due to their indoctrination and literal brain-washing, the vast majority of whom are from the Middle East, and even certain parts thereof. You would not have thought it was too hard - any normal Australian can spot a hostile MEer by the glaring and often hate-filled eyes, the xenophobia and paranoia - yet our 'security services' are totally incapable of sorting the sheep herders from the goat jumpers.

    Or is this deliberate policy to lay the groundwork for an Uberkontrol society and people? My studies of terrorism clearly show that the greatest danger to individual security in the world comes from nations.. and primarily from their own government.... and yet we continue to allow this degeneration of rights and of personal security to suit some political agenda.

    Night before last, I watched a doco using inside video footage from Al Quaeda - started with a 'martyr' preparing for his final ride in a bomb laden utility - He was chivvied by his 'mates', and alternated between spouting rhetoric and fear in the eyes.... not quite a believer it seems, but the moment he was asked a question about motivations and such, he simply said he did not understand the question. Did not have one answer to one question, yet was heading out to blow himself up with a car bomb. A senior AQ rep (nice phrase) said - after apparently coming to his senses - that AQ primarily recruited from illiterate and non-intellectual young men with little capacity to think for themselves.
    Richied
    15th Sep 2018
    10:27am
    'the moslem invasion'? Really? Just over 2% of the population is Muslim (no, not moslem). One heck of an invasion huh? That's half the size of those with Chinese heritage, and a 15th the size of those with English heritage (who may also be Muslim).

    And let's not forget the English invasion of this country. How many of us with UK descent (yes, I'm very white, anglo-saxon with protestant background) have assimilated into the real Australian culture? Personally, I've done a terrible job of it.

    Don't make this latest security measure by the government into a religious or cultural war - it's about our security when flying, and most of these measures are put in place reactively - in response to a series of known threats.
    Richied
    15th Sep 2018
    10:29am
    (to be clear, I'm 7th generation Australian from free settler stock. The 'real' Australian culture I'm referring to is not what you or I have become accustomed to, but that of the indigenous people.)
    miker
    15th Sep 2018
    11:01am
    I would much prefer the 'English Invasion' that Richied refers to, at least they don't have the habit of flying jets into city towers. If you want to see what a Muslim invasion looks like, spend some time in France or Belgium. These 2 countries are well on the way to losing their Christian identities because of their 'Muslim Invasion'. There are now well over 2500 Mosques in France. Muslims wont and by Sharia cannot assimilate. Totally agree with the new Travel laws
    Triss
    15th Sep 2018
    1:26pm
    Yes, we have Howard and his mates to thank for taking us into war with Iraq in 2003.
    And we’re still looking after them and their their healthy children whilst returned service men are battling internal and external traumas and their children are also suffering.
    Triss
    15th Sep 2018
    1:35pm
    What is so difficult, Mike’s, for a country to say. Ok, lads, we’ve given it a fair go
    obviously you’ve made a mistake so I six months you’ll be outside.
    TREBOR
    16th Sep 2018
    12:17pm
    7th generation? Free settlers? You and I must be related, Richie... it's amazing how many people a multi generational Aussie is related to, since the population was under a million back then.
    TREBOR
    15th Sep 2018
    7:35am
    "Police at our airports are highly trained in behavioural analysis and threat assessments. " Had to laugh.... oh, well...

    So now in Der Greater Austrareich hindering a Sturmer by telling him/her she is wrong, and who makes an on-the-spot judgement based on anything, can cost you $4200 and Der Konzentrationslager....

    More of that increasing acceleration towards not actually having to DO anything for violence to be exerted against you - and making arbitrary arrest and intervention on ANY reason at all no matter how unfounded 'normal' - and handing to the servants of the State total power and control over any individual at any time.

    Some call this the steady erosion of rights in the West...

    Wonder if this is why the AFP has withdrawn their liaison from Dutton's office...
    Hairy
    15th Sep 2018
    7:36am
    Maybe thumb print and retina security checks would be faster and more convenient than passport system. Terrorists would be easy to spot , no thumbs and blind .
    Migrant
    15th Sep 2018
    7:54am
    a tip for elderly passengers:- leave more time to check in and get to your gate lounge for domestic flights, at Melbourne Tullamarine.
    Recently my wife and I travelled to OOL and return for the Commonwealth Games.with Jetstar. We are both disabled OBEs and had requested wheelchair assistance. Jetstar uses T4. jetstar did not have enough staff to help at checkin with luggage, or to assist us with the long 3 km walk to the gate. So I agreed to push my wife. We just made the flight.

    Then last week we flew with Qantas to Sydney from T1,
    the assistance desk is in the furthest corner of the booking hall. only two of four checkins were manned. again we had booked for wheel chair assistance for both of us. But there were so many passengers,that i volunteered to push my wife through Security to the gate.
    Security treated us like suspect terrorists, just because my replaced hip set off the scanner, requiring me to place jacket, belt and shoes separately on trays, and eventually destroying the zip on my carry on bag during a hand search of the bag. They patched it with three safety pins ! We did not have time to complain as we had a flight to catch.

    MY POINT IS THAT WITH THE NEW POLICE POWERS TO STOP PASSENGERS , ALLOW PLENTY TIME, say an hour and a half BETWEEN ARRIVING AND FLIGHT TIME AT TULLA , if you are not young snd fit.
    KSS
    15th Sep 2018
    10:33am
    Get over yourself Migrant. EVERYONE has to go through security and place shoes, belts, coats, content of pockets, phones, take computers out of cases etc as well as hand luggage in trays when going through security checks. You are no different.

    As for wheelchair assistance, this is an issue and can be an issue with all airlines. However, when using the low cost airlines you cannot expect to receive 5 star assistance. There are also limits to the number of 'assisted' people that can be accepted on any given flight regardless of cost and this is also due to safety reasons. In the event of an emergency, the well-being of up to 400 passengers cannot be compromised due to one or two (or a few) people needing extra assistance. Harsh but true.

    Any damage caused by airline staff to luggage or personal property should be reported as soon as possible after the event. If you did not do that then the responsibility is yours. In the past I have complained about damaged suitcases where the damage had occurred by what looked like the case being dropped from a great height causing splitting in the case and wheels being torn half off. After complaining, I took the case to a drop off point for assessment. The upshot was, the case was replaced with minimum fuss and in fact a much higher quality case than the original.

    And the truth of the matter is that these days everyone should always leave plenty of time to navigate through airports whether that be in Australia or elsewhere including (or especially) if needing to change planes in transit. I have been pulled aside in the USA and 'held' for further checks on two occasions recently - twice on the same trip! Its just the way things are.
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    8:29am
    We should stop this idea immediately, what right does the government have to try and determine if someone is a threat, they should wait until someone commits an offence and maybe kill or maim someone or cause some other destruction, freedom is very important and everyone has the right to keep their identity private and commit any offence they feel like and hopefully escape the authorities and carry on with whatever their agenda is, terrorists have rights too.
    Maggie
    15th Sep 2018
    9:17am
    It is well known that people who are guilty of carrying drugs, smuggling diamonds, gold, whatever or who are attempting a crime (passing themselves off as someone else), generally exhibit signs of stress and that these people are often readily picked up at airports, on planes at disembarkation. and while they are waiting for their baggage to come off a carousel, and in queues generally. The police at airports, along with other officials are trained to identify stress.

    I would suggest that if you are innocent you will not be asked for identification and I am reassured to know that there is yet another measure in place to protect us in a time when violence and the spread of drugs and sickness, are on the increase.

    Even things apparently much less serious than drugs and violence such as bringing home seeds or cuttings by keen gardeners, which can take over from our natural vegetation or spread disease in crops etc. are a real threat to us.

    This is not about politics, it is about safety and security. Labour will get its mileage out of this, as would the other side if the tables were turned, but I feel sure they will come around to it. And the sooner the better.
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    9:35am
    Maggie you do realise I was being facetious don’t you, I have no problem with the authorities doing exactly what we expect them to do, the more measures we have in place the better. As for those indicating that it’s going to be an inconvenience and it’s going to take longer to get checked in, I don’t see how that will happen, they are not saying that they are going to stop everyone, they are going to check the identity of anyone that looks a bit suss, in fact it might be quicker for someone to produce ID than the current situation where they have to monitor someone a bit suss and wait for them to do something wrong, better use of resources I would think.
    KSS
    15th Sep 2018
    10:37am
    I agree Jim and frankly most people are walking round airports with passports or driving licences and tickets or boarding cards in their hands! No effort to hand them over to police for checking.
    Maggie
    15th Sep 2018
    1:37pm
    I only read the first line Jim!
    There is always so much negativity on this site and I thought it was more . . . .
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    2:25pm
    I know what you mean Maggie, just trying for a bit of levity.
    Kanga
    15th Sep 2018
    9:00am
    In today's world, we need extra precautions like this; the world isn't the safe place it used to be in the 1950 or 60's. Such is life now.
    Ferny
    15th Sep 2018
    9:36am
    I have no problem with this at all, as long as it’s done with politeness and some sensitivity, unlike some of the Australian border control staff checking luggage.

    Sadly, this level of authority is needed today to try and combat the very tiny minority in our community who want to harm us.
    Gra
    15th Sep 2018
    9:53am
    As wewould expect Labor and the Greens are against these new security measures, anything to support their grubby followers.
    Richied
    15th Sep 2018
    10:33am
    That's non-nonsensical. How does opposing these measures support 'grubby followers'?

    (interestingly, it is generally those more to the right - libertarians - who would oppose these measures, and not those on the left who primarily support 'for the good of the country' measures)
    Gra
    15th Sep 2018
    10:50am
    Really?? Is that why Labor has an Open Borders policy? Is that why the Greens demand anyone and everyone be allowed to come into this country by any means, leaky boat or otherwise?
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    10:55am
    You have got to be kidding Richied, the greens in particular thwart every attempt to ensure that we are safe, they believe that their privacy concerns out weigh the threats to our community, the current Labor mob will side with whatever the greens want, that’s to ensure their support at the next election, just check out both Labor and the greens policy on border protection, this is one of the reasons we need these laws now to protect us against the mass inflow of refugees that will occur once we have a change in government, that is unless we can persuade the Labor party to dump Shorten and replace him with Alby, but Shorten has made that almost impossible with the changes he introduced after he stabbed the two previous leaders in the back, he wanted to make sure it couldn’t happen to him so easily.
    TREBOR
    16th Sep 2018
    12:22pm
    Australia never had an Open borders policy, Gra... all Labor had, and LNP as well, was ONSHORE processing as opposed to OFFSHORE, and the LNP added the kicker that anyone reviewed offshore would not be settled here regardless of outcome.

    I simply cannot believe that some persist with this 'open borders' nonsense. Everyone seeking to enter must go through a gateway.... no such thing as an open border.
    OzGKW
    15th Sep 2018
    11:08am
    Crazed terrorists have changed the world forever. I would rather be asked for identification than be killed on a hijacked flight. People should expect to show identification if they are in a particularly vulnerable place.
    Don't blame the politicians who are trying to keep us safe. Blame the terrorists who are trying to kill or mame countless innocent victims. Security is only as strong as the weakest link. If terrorists know they can board Australian flights, or infiltrate airports with little security, they will start basing their operations here.
    Honest people with genuine identification have nothing to fear.
    Eddy
    15th Sep 2018
    11:12am
    I am comfortable with the federal police having right to ask for identification at airports, note 'at airports' not anywhere. I see it as no different to random roadside breath tests, being 'searched' before entering a football ground or having surveillance CCTV cameras at various locations. These measures are all to improve community safety. If I wish to avoid these 'infringements' of my liberty then I won't go to an airport, drive a car, go to the football or go into public spaces. It was not so long ago that on check-in for a domestic flight one had to show some form of photo identification. It is sad these types of measures are becoming necessary, but they are necessary.
    pedro the swift
    15th Sep 2018
    11:14am
    Don't quite understand why police need to check id in airports. Isn't that checKed when you check in for you flight and when you go through immigration(overseas flights). Or are they talking about on the non flight side ans all domestic terminals? If its on the non flight side there is no requirement to have id anyway(if you are just a visitor).Just as there is no requirement to carry id in public.(yet)
    Jim
    15th Sep 2018
    11:35am
    The reason that these laws are needed is because currently if police see someone that looks a bit suss they can’t do anything other than watch them, and then arrest them if they ultimately commit a crime, it’s called crime prevention, a simple request for some form of ID isn’t that much of a hassle, normally you don’t see police on the outward section of immigration, so this new law is aimed at those who are not necessarily going through to departures, if someone doesn’t have ID I don’t think they will be arrested on the spot, anyone going through immigration must have some form of ID to enable them to get through to the departure areas. The laws are been put there for our safety, unless someone can show me another reason they would bother to bring this law in.
    heyyybob
    15th Sep 2018
    12:03pm
    OK. Memory check folks ;) July 2017, Sydney airport, 2 Australian relatives of an Islamic State Commander were foiled in an attempt to carry an explosive device onboard an Etihad flight Sydney to Abu Dhabi. Remember ?? No, I dont have a problem with ANY procedures that will mitigate the chances of these sort of activities being carried out. Face it, it IS the type of world we live in now - no choice :(
    SKRAPI
    15th Sep 2018
    12:11pm
    YES ABSOLUTELY HAPPY THE MORE SECURITY THE BETTER .WHAT IS WRONG WITH THOSE GREENS ? WHAT STUPID PEOPLE . AS 4 SHORT ON HE JUST WANTS 2 STIR TROUBLE . BUT WHY HAVEN'T i SEEN ANY AUSTRALIANS @ THE SECURITY CHECK - OUTS ????
    pedro the swift
    15th Sep 2018
    2:32pm
    Just as the baggage handlers at Sydney airport and maybe others are of a certain eastern religion? It also appears that many of the same persuasion are getting security licenses allowing the possession of firearms. They are doing the security safety course in QLD cos its easier than in NSW and apparently many don't even have a good grasp of english. Now why would that be?
    mausey
    15th Sep 2018
    3:03pm
    Mr McKim ought to pull his head in, what happened to keeping Australians safe, if you've done nothing wrong what is the problem, wake up it's a different world now, and were still the lucky country lets try and keep it like that
    Lookfar
    15th Sep 2018
    3:19pm
    I note a few responders saying 'it's fine' or I'm comfortable or if you are innocent no problem or that sort of thing, - frankly, you are all asleep at the wheel, and possibly so close to dead you wouldn't know if you were in jail or not, to quote John Philpot Curran in 1790: "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance."
    Ductape
    16th Sep 2018
    11:37am
    Quite correct Lookfar!
    We need to be extremely careful and diligent about what we wish for about this legislation!

    Americans are very concerned about their right to bear arms being taken away, and we in Australia applauded our own gun legislation which has curtailed gun violence to a huge degree - but our real concern should be, that our normal every day freedoms are slowly being eroded away by legislation designed to 'protect us'......a more insidious approach, over time, to our future freedom I cannot imagine.

    The yanks may have a very good point about keeping their guns!
    olbaid
    16th Sep 2018
    2:26pm
    Oh - go hug a tree !!!
    heyyybob
    17th Sep 2018
    11:43am
    Lookfar....YOU are the one 'asleep at the wheel' if you can't accept there are fools out there (see my other post above and other FACTS) who are quite willing to blow themselves to pieces INCLUDING innocent men, women AND children so that they can meet (THEIR) God and a handful of virgins. Its 2018, not 1790 when the biggest threat to travellers was some one throwing a handful of horse manure at you :)
    Keith64
    15th Sep 2018
    4:45pm
    Having to carry a passport or driver's licence when undertaking domestic air travel is a further inconvenience for travellers. It, like many other regulations, may, on occasion, prevent an air incident but is more likely on most occasions to irritate and annoy innocent citizens who resent being the subject of police attention.
    miker
    15th Sep 2018
    10:12pm
    I would rather be annoyed or irritated than threatened by a crackpot. I have always had to show a licence as proof of ID Don't have any issue with the new rule
    Robson
    15th Sep 2018
    5:14pm
    This is sloppy

    “Anyone who looks suspicious can now be apprehended and asked for identification and if travellers do not cooperate, they can be ejected form airports and banned from flights.

    Legislation introduced to Parliament on Tuesday means police will now be able to carry out identity checks when travellers look suspicious or threatening.”

    Makes it sound like it has either already happened or will certainly happen, which is not true, particularly as the Government doesn’t control the Senate.
    Russell
    16th Sep 2018
    12:31pm
    I agree with the new law. I would prefer that the police can stop an incident before it happens instead of having to wait until after many people have been killed by some idiot at an airport. To those that are against this law I wonder what you would prefer. The police stop the incident before people die or for the police to have to wait until after the incident where people have died. I know what I prefer. I prefer preventative policing. To those who are against this law I do hope that none of your family are killed because of your attitude towards the laws to try and save peoples lives.
    olbaid
    16th Sep 2018
    2:25pm
    Yep - small price to pay in the interest of security for all
    Fisherman
    16th Sep 2018
    2:34pm
    Now I avoid Sydney Airport because I made the mistake of returning from Bali wearing a batik shirt! This was in 2017, and the full body search and luggage search was beyond a joke. Immigration staff were not Caucasian and the Caucasian supervisors looked on with great amusement. In Hong Kong earlier this year, I took photos of police armed with sub machine guns standing at El Al Israeli Airlines while passengers checked in for a QANTAS flight! In Australia I would be arrested for such an act now?
    olbaid
    16th Sep 2018
    2:41pm
    You shouldve got worse for your appalling fashion sense
    dreamer
    16th Sep 2018
    3:53pm
    It is a shame the way things are going I would rather fingerprints and eye scanner that is to get into the airport then no one can hide
    TinTin
    17th Sep 2018
    10:03am
    Besides would be terrorists there are plenty of crazy sometimes drug induced idiots out there who are not fit to be driving on our roads let alone sitting quietly and behaving in a respectful manner on a long haul flight. I welcome this law because I want to feel safe and enjoy the flight as much as is possible. We don't need any extra stress on a long haul flight or indeed any flight.
    Noodles
    17th Sep 2018
    10:36am
    have no problems with any increased security measures at any airport. if it keeps travellers safe why wold it be a concern for anyone?
    BillF2
    19th Sep 2018
    6:27pm
    All steps toward a totalitarian state are accompanied by the assurance that it is 'for our safety', or 'for our health'. On what basis does Peter Dutton think such new controls by the 'thought police' are necessary? How many 'incidents' have there been that justify the new powers? Of course, none of the proposed regulations are designed to apply to, or affect, parliamentarians. (Most legislation is framed in this way). It is only the unsuspecting public that have put up with and comply with even more intrusive legislation. One can only hope that there are sufficient thinking pollies who can see through this grab for power, and prevent it happening.


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