Study finds moderate drinking lowers diabetes risk

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To drink or not to drink. That is the question. The recommended answer seems to change weekly.

A new study published on the Diabetologia website has revealed that people who drink three to four times a week are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. They also found that it lowered the risk of cardiovascular disorders, such as heart attack and stroke.

The study, Alcohol patterns and risk of diabetes, said that wine seems to work best, because polyphenols, mostly found in red wine, play a role in managing blood sugar.

Men drinking one to six beers a week reduced their risk of diabetes by 21 per cent, but there was no positive effect for women beer drinkers.

Conversely, women who drink high amounts of spirits increased their risk of diabetes, while male spirit drinkers recorded no such increase.

Danish researchers surveyed over 70,000 people, asking about their alcohol intake, including how much and how often they drank.

And although these are promising results for those who enjoy the odd tipple, scientists aren’t necessarily condoning drinking more alcohol. The number of serious illnesses; cancers, heart problems, and gastrointestinal diseases, such as alcohol liver disease and pancreatitis that arise from drinking excessively are difficult to ignore.

“Alcohol is associated with 50 different conditions, so we’re not saying ‘go ahead and drink alcohol’,” said Professor Janne Tolstrup, from the National Institute of Public Health at the University of Southern Denmark.

Current health advice suggests that men and women should drink no more than 14 units of alcohol a week. This equates to roughly six pints of average strength beer or 10 glasses of low-strength wine. This should be consumed over three or four sessions, not in one go.

Overall, researchers concluded that drinking moderately three to four times a week reduced a woman’s risk of diabetes by 32 per cent and a man’s risk by 27 per cent, compared to those who drank less than one day a week.

How much do you drink? Are you sceptical about these findings? Do these types of studies sway your alcohol intake one way or another?

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Written by Leon Della Bosca

Leon Della Bosca is a voracious reader who loves words. You'll often find him spending time in galleries, writing, designing, painting, drawing, or photographing and documenting street art. He has a publishing and graphic design background and loves movies and music, but then, who doesn’t?

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13 Comments

Total Comments: 13
  1. 0
    0

    I’ve noticed my blood glucose levels reduce after having drunk a couple of wines the night before. There must be some truth to the matter. Cheers

  2. 0
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    This guy has a pretty good Advertising strategy. Everything I click on, it takes me to the guy who is SELLING these diet or exercise programs/advice. He is an American and his advertisements are long and tedious, and in the end, it all come down to paying money. I am growing tired of his face, and his advertisements.

  3. 0
    0

    As an 84 yo male who has not used alcohol for nearly 40 years I hope I won’t have too much trouble with diabetes. I seem to manage to get by with a sensible diet and exercise.

  4. 0
    0

    OK but which wines – I do not like reds – so is it the same for white wine or rose?
    I do not drink often anyway – but would have the odd extra glass if I thought it might help health-wise.

  5. 0
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    I HAD A BEER OR TWO..DIABETIC AT 67..I HEARD LOW BGL’S IN THE MORNING AFTER ALCOHOL HAS TO DO WITH THE LIVER WORKING OVERTIME TO CLEAR THE ALCOHOL, TO THE DETRIMENT OF EVERYTHING ELSE THE LIVER SHOULD BE CLEANSING..THE LIVER IS A ONE SHOT WONDER WHEN IT COMES TO ALCOHOL..ALCOHOL AND LIVER DISEASE GO TOGETHER APPARENTLY..NOT CONVINCED ON THESE STUDIES..THE POM HAS A BETTER APPROACH

  6. 0
    0

    My favourite tipple, after coffee, is Lemon, Lime & Bitters. Probably that doesn’t count, but red wine is a no-no as it gives me a headache.

  7. 0
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    The only reason I drink alcohol is because a scientist told me it’s good for my health………….really. That and the fact it makes me a lot less sensitive to nagging.

  8. 0
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    Used to be that men could drink more units than women before the alarm bells ring. Why the sudden change?

    Sensible people know when they consumed enough alcohol , don’t need constant reminding. Those that drink to the excess are fools and should be treated as such.

    Studies of this type are not very useful. Tomorrow we will find another one that contradicts this point of view.

    A carton and a flagon a day is the go.!!!!!


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