Why try small-ship cruising?

Here are our top five reasons to consider choosing a small ship for your next cruise.

Why try small-ship cruising?

It’s easy for huge cruise ships to get all the attention when they launch today. Carrying between 1500 guests and over 5000, they wow cruise fans with all manner of innovations – from 4D cinemas and specialty restaurants, to huge spas and pools with retractable roofs. If you don’t like crowds, however, there are good reasons to consider choosing a small ship for your next cruise, and the good news is that it doesn’t have to cost you a small fortune. Here’s why you should consider going small.

You travel in style

Small cruise ships tend to largely fall into the luxury category, offering a ‘red carpet’ experience, and more crew members for each person travelling, allowing the bartender to not only know your name but also your preferred pre-dinner drink. On a smaller luxury ship, more perks are also included in the fare – such as gratuities, alcoholic drinks, soft drinks and alternative dining.

You can travel affordably

Small ship cruising can be more affordable and convenient than travelling on land, with transport, accommodation and most meals included in the fare. Examples include a river cruise in Europe, travelling from Hungary to Holland; river cruising in the remote Amazon region of Brazil; cruising off shore in the Great Barrier Reef; and island hopping around the Galapagos.

Enjoy unusual ports of call

Travelling to many places in a single trip can be a hassle, especially on land. On a small ship cruise, however, you also get to visit more offbeat ports of call that larger ships can’t access, as well as enjoy unique experiences such as beach barbecues. And with fewer fellow cruisers, shore excursions groups will be smaller, making touring easier.

There are no crowds

There are smaller crowds and queues on ships with no more than 500 guests, which makes everything from ordering your morning latté to disembarking a lot easier. It’s also a more sociable way to travel, with many finding it easier to make lifelong friends. Or, at the other end of the scale, solitude is also easier to come by, with many quiet spots to call your own.

It’s all about cruising

While large ships have many distractions to woo new cruisers, small ships offer a more authentic feel of being at sea. There is also an intimate atmosphere, more flexibility with activities, more space on deck and more unusual ports of call. Instead of heading inside to a cinema or to see a Broadway production, relax in a sun lounger outside while watching the scenery slip by, and take in the sea air.

The small ship lines

Captain Cook Cruises: Affordable, casual cruising of the Murray River, the Great Barrier Reef, the Kimberley and Fiji, with a fleet of ships accommodating up to 120 guests.

Lindblad Expeditions: Allied with National Geographic, it offers soft-adventure cruising with a fleet of boutique ships accommodating between 28 and 148 guests.

North Star Cruises: The True North accommodates 36 guests and spends most of her time cruising around Australia, with annual sorties to Papua New Guinea.

Regent Seven Seas Cruises: Offers three all-inclusive ships; and if you cruise on Seven Seas Voyager or Seven Seas Mariner, everyone gets a suite with a balcony.

Seabourn Cruise Line: A small fleet of luxury ships, which are all-inclusive, and carry no more than 450 guests in all-suite accommodations with ocean views.

SeaDream Yacht Club: The all-inclusive SeaDream I and II are more mega-yachts than traditional cruise ships, with a dress code of casually elegant and watersports platforms.

Silversea Cruises: This European boutique fleet offers luxury accommodations with private verandahs, butlers and complimentary shoreside events on some cruises.

Star Clippers: This is a tall-ship experience, with no rigid timetables, a casual dress code and a focus on outdoor activities, such as snorkelling and diving.

To find out more about cruising or to find the cruise of your dreams within your budget, visit CruiseGuide.com.au. 






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