15th Feb 2019
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The perfect place to go for affordable Michelin dining
There’s more affordable Michelin dining in Hong Kong than you can poke a chopstick at.

Mention Michelin-starred restaurants and most of us automatically think ‘expensive’. However, while Hong Kong certainly has its share of exclusive and glamourous dining experiences, it also has a number of easily-accessible and affordable Michelin dining options.

From Michelin-starred meals that cost less than A$8, Hong Kong serves a variety of mouth-watering options, so you can sample and savour until your heart is content when it comes to flavoursome food without the price tag.

Here's a list of just a few of Hong Kong’s affordable restaurants to sample on your next visit …

Tsim Chai Kee – Wellington Street, Central
Since opening in 1998, this highly regarded noodle shop has become famous for its handmade minced fish balls. Michelin inspectors highly recommend the deluxe dish of fish balls, massive shrimp wontons, and sliced beef on top of hand-pulled noodles. Loved by locals and visitors alike, Tsim Chai Kee is best visited in the early afternoon to avoid queues, but if you do get caught in the queue, the A$35 Michelin-recommended meal is well worth the wait.

Mak’s Noodle – Wellington Street, Central
Nearby to Tsim Chai Kee you’ll find another must-visit, Mak’s Noodle. Known for its perfectly seasoned shrimp wontons wrapped in delicate flour casings and swimming in rich soup that bursts with flavour. The atmosphere and scintillating aromas in this flourishing neighbourhood eatery are so good, that it has even been endorsed by world-renowned chef, Anthony Bourdain. Best of all, a bowl of Mak’s soup will only set you back around A$7.

Wang Fu – Wellington Street, Central
Your ‘Michelin crawl’ continues along Wellington Street with a visit to Wang Fu – famous for its Pekingese dumplings. There are 10 on the menu and we recommend trying them all (which may require a second or third visit), but if you’re short on time, the green onion mutton and vegetarian dim sum are the best place to start. A meal at Wang Fu will cost you around A$35.

Luk Yu Tea House – Stanley Street, Central
Like Wellington Street, Stanley Street also offers many budget Michelin eateries. Luk Yu Tea House could be the priciest on this list, but dishes start at around A$35, so it’s still still great value. With customers that include local celebrities and big banking bosses, this ornate traditional tea house is famed for its quality service, animated atmosphere and subtle colonial decoration. Michelin inspectors recommend the fried prawns on toast and fried noodles with sliced beef, as well as the sweet barbecue pork buns and xioa long bao (soup dumplings).

Tim Ho Wan – Fuk Wing Street, Sham Shui Po
You can find Tim Ho Wan franchises all over the globe, but one of the originals and best is located in Sham Shui Po. Known as one of the most affordable Michelin-starred restaurants in the world, Tim Ho Wan serves reasonably priced dim sum, as well as authentic dishes such as succulent shrimp and pork siu mai (open-faced dumplings), banana leaf wrapped sticky rice, steamed shrimp dumplings and the highly regarded barbeque pork buns – all made to order and for around A$35 for a whole meal.

Kam’s Roast Goose – Hennessy Road, Wan Chai
In Wan Chai, you’ll find a quaint, single-room Michelin-starred restaurant that was founded by Kam’s grandfather and has been passed down through two generations. Kam’s Roast Goose enjoys international acclaim for its mouth-watering namesake offering, with to-die-for crispy skin and moist, succulent meat. This classic eating house is quite small, so you may need to queue, but the enticing aromas should be enough to keep you entertained while you wait, and once you’re sitting down to a plate of Kam’s goose, you’ll be amply rewarded. Dinner or lunch will cost approximately A$35.

As you can see, eating fine food doesn’t have to be a bank-breaking exercise, at least not in Hong Kong. For more information about Hong Kong’s foodie scene, visit www.discoverhongkong.com

Insider’s tip: Take cash, as most of these smaller eateries don’t accept credit or debit card payments.





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