Early warning signs of Parkinson’s disease

It can be difficult to tell if you have Parkinson’s. Here are the symptoms.

Early warning signs of Parkinson’s disease

With around 700,000 people in Australia living with Parkinson’s, either having the disease itself, caring for someone with Parkinson’s, or knowing someone affected, you’d think that there would be more awareness of the condition. Yet, apart from the obviously visible symptoms, such as shakes and tremors, not many people would recognise the symptoms of Parkinson’s.

It’s probably not surprising, because it can be difficult to tell if you have the disease.

However, there are 10 symptoms which can indicate that you may have Parkinson’s. Having one or two of these symptoms shouldn’t be alarming, but if you have a few of them, it may be time to visit your GP or health professional.

1. Tremors and shakes
The most commonly noticed symptom of Parkinson’s is shaking or trembling. This may come in the form of a tremor in your finger, hand, thumb, lip or chin. It may also be that your leg shakes when you sit and relax.

2. Dizziness or fainting
If you’ve been having dizziness when you stand up, or if you sometimes feel like fainting, you should see your doctor. It could be a sign of low-blood pressure or something worse. There’s even a theory that dizziness can lead to dementia.

3. Lost sense of smell
Do you have trouble smelling certain foods, such as banana or liquorice? Has anyone said your perfume or aftershave is far too strong? If so, you may need to see your GP.

4. Increased stiffness when moving or walking
Stiffness may begin in your hip or shoulder, or you may notice that you don’t swing your arms when you walk, or that you feel as if you’re walking with cement shoes on, but once these signs progress to the point where you’re finding it difficult to walk or move at all, you should probably get checked out. It may just be that you’re stiff, but it could also be a precursor to Parkinson’s.

5. Trouble sleeping
Are you particularly ‘active’ during your sleep time? Flailing about, kicking or punching when you are asleep, or even falling out of bed are all early warning signs of Parkinson’s. You may not notice them, but it may pay for you to be aware if your partner is telling you about such night-time activities.

6. Constipation
Having trouble moving your bowels can also be a sign of Parkinson’s, but this is one where you shouldn’t panic if it’s a sole symptom. There are plenty of things that cause constipation.

7. Speaking quietly
Do people have trouble hearing what you’re saying? Is your voice low, soft or do you often have people telling you that you sound as if you have a sore throat? A change in your voice can be a sign of Parkinson’s, or it could just be a sore throat or a virus.

8. You look as if you had botox
Has your face lost its elasticity or do you always look as if you’re in a sombre mood? A serious-looking face with a blank stare is known as masking – and it could also be a sign of Parkinson’s.

9. Small handwriting
If your handwriting is much smaller than it was in the past; if your letters are more bunched together or the way you write words has changed drastically, this could be a sign of Parkinson’s.

10. Hunching or slouching
Do you find yourself hunched over when you walk? Do you slouch in your chair more so than before? Do you feel as if you stoop when you stand? All of these could be symptoms of Parkinson’s.

So, what if you do have Parkinson’s?
Life goes on, even after a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. You may need to create a life strategy with your doctor, and you’ll be seeing a neurologist for assistance and check-ups. Your occupational therapist, speech therapist and physical therapist will help you through the day-to-day, and a social worker can help you manage the ongoing psychological effects in your life.

For more information about Parkinson’s disease, please visit parkinsons.org.au

Do you, or does anyone you know, have Parkinson’s? How do you/they manage? Would you mind sharing any tips or advice with our members?

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    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    Aggle
    6th Jan 2020
    9:40pm
    My brother had Parkinson's and a very handy thing my sister-in-law did, was put little bits of Velcro on the flaps of the pockets of his shirts. He carried, amongst other things, his phone in his shirt pocket. Because of his tremor, he had considerable difficulty undoing the little button each time, but the piece of Velcro stopped his phone falling out if he bent over and made it easy to get to his phone when he needed to answer it.
    Bridgit
    7th Jan 2020
    9:06am
    My husband has had Parkinson's for over 10 years and I fought with our GP to acknowledge it and get him to a Neurologist!
    All the signs were there - the biggest one was how he walked and stood he shuffled like an old man and couldn't pick his feet up - pilling with his right hand - twitching, shaking right side, and masking. And the fool missed all of it until I threatened to smack him around the ears if he didn't watch him try to get up out of a chair and how he tried to walk!
    When we got to the Neuro he wasn't happy about how long he had been let go for and that he was Stage 3 - there are only 5 stages!
    The biggest thing is for them to get over denial and getting motivated to live life and keep active and productive. Vit D Protocol has helped him tremendously along with Mega B Complex - he went from not wanting to do anything and no interest to wanting to go out to his workshop and try to make his equipment safe for him to use - wanting to be doing something everyday and live his life to the full in his mind. I sometimes have to apply the slowdown brakes and insist he take it easy for a couple of days - but he is enjoying what he is doing, whether he is helping me in the garden, working in his shed, feeding the animals and making sure the wild animals have their feed and water, doing repair jobs around the place.
    Oh they do have their bad days and we laugh about some things that happen - being able to laugh might seem cruel but we know it is best - keeping himself productive ( he is slow but he achieves a lot) and I and I rarely say to him that I would prefer you don't do that - you have to be careful how you put things at times because the old Parkinson's Grouch jumps up and then you have big comprehension issues.
    All in all just give lots of encouragement, support, laughter, say thank you for help, and say well done when they achieve what they wanted to do, keep them positive and don't let that negativity creep in - and try to keep the stress levels down as stress really rocks their boat!
    Taragosun
    7th Jan 2020
    1:56pm
    Thank you Bridgit for that summary. There are some very useful tips there .. in case we ever need them.
    michellemartin
    17th Mar 2020
    10:18pm
    I am 65 years old, I was diagnosed of Parkinson's disease at the age of 59. I had severe calf pain, muscle pain, slurred speech, frequent falls, loss of balance, difficulty getting up from sitting position. i was on Carbidopa and Pramipexole for two years, as the disease progressed my symptoms worsened, with my neurologist guidance i started on natural PARKINSON'S DISEASE TREATMENT from Rich Herbal garden w w w. richherbalgardens. c o m The treatment worked very effectively for my Parkinson’s, most of my severe symptoms simply vanished within the first 3 months on the treatment, i feel better now than I have felt in years and i can feel my strength again. My neurologist was very open when looking at alternative medicines and procedures, this alternative Parkinson's disease treatment is indeed a breakthrough.
    arnoldemminy
    9th Apr 2020
    8:44am
    I was diagnosed in November 2007 with Parkinson's Disease. I have left side tremors, balance and gait issues and some non-motor symptoms:  quiet voice, some cognitive decline, small handwriting. I am currently on Sinemet for tremors and Cymbalta for neuropathy related to diabetes and previous chemotherapy. It was on my 25th anniversary of surviving breast cancer that I got the PD diagnosis. I am 69, retired, single woman sharing a house with my sister.  I like to read, quilt, and crochet. I have been reading up on PD.  Until I read too much and it scares me.  Then I put it away until I calm down and can research it some more. I need advice and some direction. I searched further, visited Parkinson’s websites, blogs. I find info about someone having the same symptoms. I was really determined. Fortunately for me, I stumbled on a testimony of someone who had Parkinson’s for several years and was cured through Herbal medication. I read awesome stories of people whose condition were worse. I was not a fan of Herbal Medication, because I once believed that they have not researched it enough. But due to numerous testimonies  I was more than willing to try it…. I contacted  Dr. Fabien, and I purchased the medicine and used just the way doctor instructed. Its a thing of joy to come back and make my review.. It became a miracle for me within 7 months. The herbal medication worked without any trace of side effects on I’m…. totally free. I have been cured for Parkinson’s. I was a shocking experience with the medicine. I never knew I will be free for Parkinson’s disease.  Email dr.fabiencontantin@gmail.com or www.kunimeherbs.com


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